Derek Trucks on His Epic Journey

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·3 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Derek Trucks
Derek Trucks

David McClister

Get to Know Derek Trucks

Called one of the greatest guitarists of all time by Rolling Stone magazine, Derek Trucks was a child prodigy who began playing in front of large crowds when he was still in grade school. And by the time he was 19-years-old, he was touring with the Allman Brothers. But for the last dozen years Derek been producing some of the best music of his career as a member of the Tedeschi Trucks band, which he formed with his wife Susan Tedeschi in 2010. Today on the show, we talk about his childhood in Jacksonville, Florida, his close relationship with Gregg Allman, and the lessons from his parents that helped him survive the music industry. Derek also talks about the Tedeschi Trucks Band's epic new project, I Am Moon, and why it means so much to his band and his family.

What Derek Trucks Talks About in This Episode

*Growing up in Jacksonville, Florida

*His mom being the cook in the family

*Family reunions

*His uncle Butch Trucks, one of the founding members of the Allman Brothers

*Playing music at an early age

*Meeting and playing with Susan and Tedeschi Trucks

*Lessons he learned from his parents

*Preparing for a Summer Tour

*I Am The Moon Project

Quotes from Derek Trucks

"l learned a lot from Uncle Butch. He was an incredible force. Incredible musician and in a lot of ways, I think his reverence for that music and his intensity and just the way he felt about Duane Allman in those early days. That's what carried a lot of the integrity of that sound and that band. No one could play like him."

There's something that happens down here that's just different than anywhere else. It sounds and feels different. It smells different. The food, the culture, just leading with politeness, I appreciate.  I know it's not always 100% pure and true everywhere you go, but it sure is a nice start. We travel all over the world and there are places you go, where you get that familiar sense like, 'I like it here. It feels like the South.'

—Derek Trucks

"Now, the family reunions were pretty incredible, though, the Trucks family reunions. 'Cause most of the Trucks are from Alabama, and when you get that huge crew together, the Southern cooking was pretty incredible."

"I feel lucky I ran into the right people at the right time."

"One of the things I've learned from being on the road with bands like the Allman Brothers or groups that have been around a while is, if you wear a song out, it's hard to un-wear it out … So, we're really conscious of trying to let the fields rest sometimes. You can't overplant these things. 'Midnight In Harlem' is one that I, I hope we never get to that point 'cause it's always when it starts and when everything kicks in, it always feels really good."

About Biscuits & Jam

In the South, talking about food is personal. It's a way of sharing your history, your family, your culture, and yourself. Each week Sid Evans, editor in chief of Southern Living, sits down with celebrity musicians to hear stories of how they grew up, what inspired them, and how they've been shaped by Southern culture. Sid takes us back to some of their most cherished memories and traditions, the family meals they still think about, and their favorite places to eat on the road.

Download and listen to this episode of Biscuits & Jam with Derek Trucks on Apple Podcasts,  Spotify, Amazon Music, or everywhere podcasts are available.

Get a transcript of the full interview with Derek Trucks.