This Brewing System Is Like the KitchenAid Stand Mixer for Coffee

This Brewing System Is Like the KitchenAid Stand Mixer for Coffee
This Brewing System Is Like the KitchenAid Stand Mixer for Coffee
Kelsey Ogletree

When my husband and I were creating our wedding registry, my No. 1 most-anticipated item was a KitchenAid stand mixer. As someone who’s loved to bake from about age 3, getting this coveted kitchen item to call my own was like a rite of passage. The hardest part was choosing a color—there are so many beautiful options to choose from! Ultimately, I went with a fuchsia number (actual color: cranberry) that, at times, I regretted, as it clashed with our starter-home kitchen so much that I couldn’t leave it out on the counter. Over the last six years, however, I’ve come to adore its bright, cheery hue that will one day be the perfect pop of color in the white and navy kitchen of my dreams.

Imagine the thrill of my pink-loving heart when, after seeing this fantastic coffee maker called the Moccamaster pop up on various friends’ Instagram Stories, I discovered it came in just as many colors as the KitchenAid mixers. Leave the trendy brushed brass and elegant copper to kitchen sophisticates: Once I realized this 10-cup drip coffee maker came in pink, I had to have it.

Since quarantine began and “normal” days went out the window, I’ve been seeking ways to bring routine back into my life. One of those ways has turned out to be my morning coffee ritual, which has myriad benefits: First, it forces me to take a short break from my laptop. Second, it gives me something to look forward to mid-morning. And third, the result is a delicious, hot cup that I can sip on while I’m writing. All of these reasons led me to justify the price of this Moccamaster, which is on the high side for a relatively simple machine ($310-$350 at Williams Sonoma, depending on the model).

Besides the 15 color options, what makes this coffee machine so special? The experts at Williams Sonoma, one of the few stores in the U.S. that carries the Netherlands-made Moccamaster from Technivorm, say it’s because it’s designed to deliver the ultimate, consistently delicious cup of coffee at home.

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Bradley Kleparek, electric buyer for Williams Sonoma, says it’s all about the four Ts: temperature (coffee brewed between 196-205 degrees Fahrenheit), time (coffee and water are in contact for just the right amount of time), turbulence (the design of the machine encourages the right amount of agitation) and temperature for holding (the heating plate is regulated at 175-185 degrees, meaning it won’t burn your coffee once brewed).

Having previously been using a French press to make my morning brew, one thing I liked about Moccamaster from the start was how quickly it made a pot of coffee. Start to finish, from me grinding fresh beans to adding water to the machine to pouring a cup, it takes about five minutes—compared to about 15 minutes start to finish for French press. The one thing I’ve had to get used to is buying coffee filters again (which also have an interesting double use!), and carefully weighing out coffee to ensure the proper ratio of coffee to water is key (which does add a step for those used to a traditional coffee maker).

The Moccamaster doesn’t have any bells and whistles (and sorry, no timer if you’re the kind of person who needs coffee the minute you wake up), but the simple design means it’s quick to clean after each use, and pretty tough to mess up. Each piece—including the nine-hole spray arm that dispenses the water evenly over your coffee grounds—pops off easily for rinsing and drying. As with other coffee machines, the manufacturer recommends descaling (i.e., removing mineral deposit buildup through a deep clean) every few months.

I’ve only had mine for a few weeks now, but customer reviews report serious longevity with the Moccamaster: One reviewer commented that they’ve used the same machine for more than 14 years, and it’s still producing consistently excellent coffee. One caveat, however—the coffee comes out hot (like, seriously hot), so it will often curdle any milk or cream you add to it. The remedy I’ve found here is to heat my cream a bit before adding it, and be sure to give your cup of coffee a good stir unless you want to end up with no tastebuds the next few days.

Buy Your Own: Moccamaster 10-Cup Coffee Maker with Glass Carafe

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