Are AllBirds worth it? Everything you need to know about 'the world's most comfortable shoe'

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AllBirds sneakers have reached an all-time high in popularity since launching in 2016—and if you covet a pair of comfy sneakers, look no further. The brand behind “the world’s most comfortable shoe” combines comfort, style and sustainability with its six different shoe styles for men and women.

Most recently, AllBirds introduced a water-resistant version of its original and most beloved wool runners and has expanded to include socks, insoles and “Smallbirds” a kids version of the sneakers that made them famous. The wildly popular brand has also amassed a celebrity following that includes the likes of Jennifer Garner, Mila Kunis, Leonardo DiCaprio (who also happens to be an investor) and even President Obama. Not bad for a company who got its start on Kickstarter just a few years ago.

But above all, AllBirds absolutely nails it in the comfort department, and you don’t have to be an athlete to appreciate just how incredible the brand’s classic Wool Runners feel on your feet.

So what makes these sneakers so hot? Well, it’s not the wool they’re made from.

One glance at these sustainable, machine-washable shoes may conjure memories of an itchy winter sweater, but they’re actually the complete opposite. AllBirds runners are made using superfine New Zealand merino wool, which is temperature-regulating, making them cushy yet breathable, not hot and itchy. And, for good measure, the insoles—which are made with castor bean oil-based foam—are lined with the ultra-soft merino wool fabric to help wick away moisture and reduce odor. In fact, you can even ditch socks altogether when you’re wearing a pair of cozy AllBirds.

The lightweight soles are made from a low-density rubber-foam polymer that delivers stability while the S-curve tread mimics the foot for friction control. Moreover, the sole’s unique shape is designed to slightly flare out at the ball of the foot to distribute weight evenly with every stride.

Whether you’re running errands, traveling, or wearing them daily, AllBirds will feel comfy long after you hit your daily 10,000 steps. Hundreds of reviewers on the site can’t get enough of the comfortable shoes, with a few comparing the feelings of comfort to clouds and pillows. Just keep in mind they’re technically made to be running shoes despite their appearance — but they sure are the ultimate walking shoes which is more important if you ask us.

And speaking of appearance, typically, comfortable shoes aren’t synonymous with style, but the minimalist wool runners are an exception. With just eight shoelace holes and hardly any visible branding (besides the engraved heel), AllBirds are the perfect accessory for a casual weekend outfit or when you’re running errands. There’s something incredibly chic and versatile about a pair of sneakers that aren’t emblazoned in branding or have an overly-flashy colorway.

AllBirds wool runnings are available for men and women in four “classic” shades and a rotating assortment of nine limited edition colors. At $95, they’re not a steal, but they won’t necessarily break the bank either. And, if you’re not totally impressed, the brand offers a free 30-day trial so you can get a full refund, even after you put some miles on your wool runners.

So, if you’re in the market for comfortable shoes you’ll practically live in, our advice is to jump on the AllBirds bandwagon.

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