The 9 Best Restaurants At Epcot And What You Should Order

·7 min read
Photo credit: Todd Anderson
Photo credit: Todd Anderson

This year is Epcot’s 40th birthday, and it’s going to be a huge, delicious celebration. Of all the Walt Disney World parks, Epcot is the epicurean’s favorite destination. There’s the famous World Showcase, where you can feast your way around pavilions representing 11 countries.

More than that, there are also the incredible food and drink festivals happening all year at Epcot, like the unmatched Epcot International Flower and Garden Festival in the spring, and the must-visit Epcot International Festival of Food and Wine, which is so popular that it started in July this year, earlier than ever before.

It can be hard to narrow down all the options at Epcot, especially when some of the spots are fine-dining. But don’t be worried about bringing the little ones to any of these restaurants—every Epcot dining establishment is 100 percent kid-friendly.

We’ve done the hard work of tasting around the world for you. Here are Epcot’s best, most memorable dining experiences and our favorite dishes to order.

Le Cellier

Photo credit: Disney
Photo credit: Disney

If there’s one restaurant you need to hit at Epcot, it’s Le Cellier, the steakhouse in the Canada Pavilion. This restaurant is a winner based on aesthetics alone: you descend a flower-lined path, past a rock waterfall and pond, towards the regal chateau that’s the centerpiece of the area, to the entrance. Inside, you’ll find an unmissable poutine topped with Canadian cheddar cheese curds, truffle, and red wine reduction ($14); a cheddar cheese soup ($13) that’s so popular it appears annually at food festivals; and steaks like a Le Cellier filet mignon ($59) and USDA Prime rib eye ($57). Make your reservations early, because this place understandably books up quickly.

Les Halles Boulangerie-Patisserie

Photo credit: Matt Stroshane
Photo credit: Matt Stroshane

Chefs de France is the France Pavilion’s sit-down restaurant, serving reliable bistro food, but Les Halles Boulangerie-Patisserie is a hidden gem. All the way at the back of the pavilion, through the gift shop for the Beauty and the Beast sing-along show, is a wonderland of pastries, like a traditional beignet ($4.95) or a mousse au chocolat ($6.50). All of them are perfectly acceptable to eat for breakfast, with the best coffee in the park (or a glass of champagne). The bakery also has sandwiches like a croque monsieur ($9.25) and bisque de homard ($5.95), which is lobster bisque in a bread bowl. Do yourself a favor and grab a few treats to go, and have them for breakfast in your hotel room.

Space 220 Lounge

Photo credit: Todd Anderson
Photo credit: Todd Anderson

Space 220 is the newest table-service restaurant in Epcot, and takes you from Future World up an elevator into “space,” where you look out the windows of your ship down to earth below. It’s one of the hardest reservations to get anywhere in the entire Walt Disney World resort. The menu is prix fixe and $55 for adults and $29 for kids. You may be better off in the Space 220 Lounge, which you can access via walk-up list, where you can order a la carte snacks like astro deviled eggs with maple-glazed bacon and pickled shallots ($12) and fun, space-themed cocktails like a stargarita with Espolon Blanco, Cointreau, house-made agave sour, and b’lure ($16).

San Angel Restaurante

Photo credit: Disney
Photo credit: Disney

The perpetual debate among Epcot lovers is whether, when you’ve reached the entrance to the World Showcase, you turn left into Mexico or right into Canada to start your tasting-around-the-world journey. If you’re hungry, turn left, and beeline for the Mayan-inspired pyramid in Mexico. Inside, you’ll find an incredible sugar skull art installation, a marketplace selling Mexican gifts and souvenirs, the Three Caballeros ride, and San Angel Restaurante.

The more casual of the Mexico Pavilion’s restaurants, San Angel has an unmatched atmosphere: you’re sitting in the shadow of a Mayan pyramid (yes, there’s a pyramid inside the pyramid, just go with it) under a twilight sky, as the boats from the ride float by. Even if the food weren’t excellent, the opportunity to sit in a cool, dim atmosphere and take a break from the Florida heat would be enough to recommend the place. Lucky for you, there are options like pollo a las rajas ($30), which is grilled chicken breast with poblano pepper cream sauce; and camarones a la diabla ($31), which is guajillo pepper and garlic shrimp.

Spice Road Table

Photo credit: Matt Stroshane
Photo credit: Matt Stroshane

In the Morocco Pavilion, Spice Road Table often gets overlooked for the splashier pavilions that have rides and more entertainment. (I’m convinced the giant fountain in the Italy Pavilion is the only reason those restaurants are packed all the time.) Don’t sleep on this waterfront restaurant, though, serving remarkably good Mediterranean food like chicken with ras el hanout, mint yogurt, and tabbouleh ($11); and the absolutely legendary hummus fries with citrus chipotle and preserved lemon ($10). This restaurant is especially good for vegetarians and anyone on a plant-based diet, and has recently shifted away from reservations to walk-up service.

Kringla Bakeri Og Kafe

Photo credit: Julie Tremaine
Photo credit: Julie Tremaine

I’m going to be honest with you: I don’t always choose a sit-down restaurant in Epcot. To me, that park is about getting drinks and snacks as you walk. One of my unmissable spots on an Epcot graze is Kringla Bakeri Og Kafe, the bakery in the Norway Pavilion. Here, you’ll find one of the park’s most beloved treats, called schoolbread ($4.49), which is sweet bread filled with custard and topped with coconut. Head to the shady little patio out back, and you can watch the action of the park while having a treat.

Tokyo Dining

Photo credit: Julie Tremaine
Photo credit: Julie Tremaine

As far as dining options in the Japan Pavilion go, Teppan Edo gets all the love — and it totally makes sense, given what an entertaining and kid-friendly dining adventure hibachi is. But Tokyo Dining is a sleeper hit: the restaurant has easy-to-get reservations and serves great Japanese food like grilled salmon with sweet yuzu miso ($32) and yaki udon ($30). Tokyo Dining also has a vast array of sushi, which will pass muster with sushi die-hards: think sashimi and nigiri, as well as designer rolls like the volcano roll ($20), a California roll topped with tuna, yellowtail, salmon, smelt roe, tempura crunch, and volcano sauce.

Rose & Crown Dining Room

Photo credit: Disney
Photo credit: Disney

The fish and chips stand in front of this restaurant in the United Kingdom Pavilion might, and I say this without exaggeration, serve the best fish and chips in the U.S. If the walk-up kiosk is that good, imagine how excellent the British pub fare in the Rose & Crown Dining Room is. You can get those fish and chips ($26), but also coronation salad with Madras dressing ($12), bangers and mash ($22) and a Welsh pub burger with beer cheese sauce, bacon, and beer-battered leeks ($22). If you miss the sticky toffee pudding ($9)… well, I can’t help you.

Karamell-Küche

Photo credit: Disney
Photo credit: Disney

This sweet shop in Germany is where all perfect Epcot days end. And if you’re smart, where the next perfect day begins if you brought home desserts to have for breakfast. Karamell-Küche means “caramel kitchen” in German, and the irresistible smell of caramel cooking wafts out of the pavilion to the walkways. Everything I’ve tasted here has been the best iteration of that treat I’ve ever had, from the freshly-made caramel popcorn ($6.99) to the chocolate caramel square dipped in sea salt ($4.49). My hands-down favorite, though, is the salted caramel butter bar ($4.49), which is a decadent-beyond-imagination shortbread and caramel bar. You might need to share it — it’s that rich — but you really won’t want to.

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