• This customer-invented secret drink got so popular at Starbucks it’s now officially on the menu!

    Starbucks has always given us what we want. From our beloved pumpkin spice lattes in the fall to newly released breakfast items,…

  • FBI searches for teen feared to have been abducted, gang-raped and fed to alligators

    The FBI have searched a remote rural location hoping to find clues about the disappearance of a 17-year-old girl who was allegedly abducted, gang-raped, shot and then fed to alligators. The bureau was searching a rural area of South Carolina on Friday (24 March) in connection to the disappearance of Brittannee Drexel, which occurred almost eight years ago. Last summer Taquan Brown, who is serving 25 years for an unrelated manslaughter case, testified that Drexel was abducted, gang-raped and then shot dead when she tried to escape in 2009.

  • Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

    Anyone who's played a futuristic shooter since the dawn of video games knows that when you see something called a "railgun" you're in for a real treat. Well, the US Navy built a railgun of its very own , and it just showed off its remarkably powerful creation in a new video of its test firing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=106&v=Pi-BDIu_umo Railguns like the one the Navy has built trade chemical propellants like gunpowder for the sheer power of electricity, generating extremely strong magnetic fields to push a projectile down a set of rails and out the end of the barrel. It might not sound particularly efficient, but the speeds that railgun projectiles can achieve put traditional cannons to shame. The Navy's massive weapon, for example, launches its rounds at a whopping 4,500 mph. Additionally, the projectiles launched by the railgun do their damage not by exploding, but simply by striking their target while moving at such a high speed, quite literally tearing apart anything they come into contact with. For most of their history, railguns have been more fiction than science, and their practicality and reliability has repeatedly been questioned over time. The size of the device itself is typically massive, owing to the large and complex electronic components required to supply the necessary power. However, there are also some pretty fantastic benefits of the non-explosive rounds, such as much less chance of unexploded ordnance causing problems either on the ship or vehicle firing the weapon, or on the battlefield after a skirmish has ended.

  • The Most Powerful Heroines in Literature (Because #WomensHistoryMonth)

    The Most Powerful Heroines in Literature (Because #WomensHistoryMonth)

  • United Airlines stopped girls in yoga leggings from boarding flight

    The latest travel ban appears to include yoga gear. On Sunday, a United Airlines gate agent stopped two girls from boarding a flight from Denver to Minneapolis for wearing leggings, according to a live account of the debacle by Shannon Watts, a fellow passenger and founder of Moms Demand Action, a grassroots movement to end gun violence. “She’s forcing them to change or put dresses on over leggings or they can’t board,” she tweeted. “Since when does @united police women’s clothing?” Responding on Twitter, United Airlines, a unit of United Continental Holdings UAL, +0.64% , tweeted that such decisions were at the discretion of a gate agent and said it has the right to refuse transport for passengers

  • Here's how you're told by the President you've been awarded the nation's highest award for bravery

    On Saturday, President Donald Trump hosted 25 living recipients of the Medal of Honor at the White House in recognition of the rarely-celebrated Medal of Honor Day. But being awarded the the nation's highest military award doesn't happen often. The medal has only been conferred just 18 times after more than a decade of combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many recipients lose their lives in the act that the award recognizes. But some, like retired Marine Cpl. Kyle Carpenter - who received the award in June 2014 - survive and learn from the president that they are being given the highest possible recognition for their courage. So how does that discussion actually go? Fortunately, that moment when Carpenter

  • Ask Amy: My husband told me to ‘get over it,’ so here’s my plan

    DEAR AMY: I have been married for 33 years. I love my husband, but I have totally enabled him - to the point where I am now feeling abused. For instance, this morning, he was in a minor car accident. Through my business relationships, I have an excellent contact in the repair business, and so I kindly took his car in, gave him mine to use in the interim and picked up the rental. I asked him to drive the rental so I could have my car back, and he refused. I told him I felt used. He basically said I should get over it. Because of my family background and decades of behaving this way, I am now at the point where I feel incredibly put upon because of all of the expectations, as well as the total