• Style
    WWD

    Serena Williams and Daughter Olympia Star in First Fashion Campaign Together

    The tennis star and her three-year-old daughter are featured in Stuart Weitzman's spring campaign.

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  • Celebrity
    In The Know

    Man taken aback by girlfriend’s ‘extreme’ reaction to his homemade food: ‘I’m not cooking for her [again]’

    The man was stunned when Reddit figured out the shocking reason why his girlfriend was behaving this way. The post Man taken aback by girlfriend’s ‘extreme’ reaction to his homemade food: ‘I’m not cooking for her [again]’ appeared first on In The Know.

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  • Politics
    The Week

    The Trump administration reportedly quietly funded Operation Warp Speed with money set aside for hospitals

    By late summer last year, Operation Warp Speed accounts were running dry, so the Trump administration appears to have used a financial maneuver allowing Department of Health and Human Services officials to divert $10 billion from a fund meant to help hospitals and health care providers affected by the coronavirus pandemic, Stat News reports. Congress granted the HHS permission to move pandemic-related money between accounts, though the agreement stipulated the agency had to give lawmakers a heads up. In this case, it appears the HHS siphoned the funds quietly, albeit with permission from its top lawyer. Other attorneys told Stat that the agency likely did have the wiggle room to carry out the action. Former Office of Management and Director Russ Vought defended the decision and said "we would do it again," telling Stat that not only did the administration have the authority, it was also "the right thing to do in order to move as quickly as possible because lives were on the line." Other Trump officials seemed to agree, per Stat, arguing that successful vaccines would reduce hospitalizations, making Warp Speed the more consequential outlet. It's still unclear whether the decision has resulted in less money for health care providers, as the Biden administration remains mum on the subject, Stat reports. Read more at Stat News. More stories from theweek.comManhattan DA investigators are reportedly focusing on the Trump Organization's chief financial officerHistorian: Biden's support for Amazon workers voting to unionize is 'almost unprecedented'The myth of the male bumbler

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  • U.S.
    The Takeout

    Florida fishermen wrangle 300-pound grouper, potentially incurring wrath of Poseidon [Updated]

    Update, March 2, 2021: The grouper has been eaten.

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  • Celebrity
    MarketWatch

    I married ‘the life of the party.’ But all he does is take his financial troubles out on me and call me a gold digger

    There are three topics: My husband, his business and his family.’ Let’s just say there are three topics of conversation: my husband, his failing business and his terrible family. The pandemic hurt the already shaky family firm.

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  • U.S.
    NBC News

    Mom reports 6-year-old missing, but police say she ran him over and threw him in the Ohio River

    Brittany Gosney told investigators she tried to abandon her son in a wildlife area and ran over him when he attempted to get back into her vehicle, according to court documents.

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  • Politics
    The Week

    Manhattan DA investigators are reportedly focusing on the Trump Organization's chief financial officer

    Investigators with the Manhattan District Attorney's office are taking a closer look at Trump Organization CFO Allen Weisselberg, as they continue a probe into former President Donald Trump and his family business, people with knowledge of the matter told The New York Times. They are investigating potential financial fraud, and whether Trump and the Trump Organization manipulated property values in order to receive loans and reduce property taxes, the Times reports. Weisselberg, 73, has worked for the Trump Organization for decades, starting at the company when it was helmed by Fred Trump, the former president's father. Two people familiar with the matter said prosecutors have been asking witnesses about Weisselberg, and spoke with one person about Weisselberg's sons — Barry, the property manager of Trump Wollman Rink in Central Park, and Jack, who works at Ladder Capital, one of Trump's lenders. None of the Weisselbergs have been accused of wrongdoing, and there is no indication Barry and Jack are a focus of the probe, the Times says. The investigation began more than two years ago, with the district attorney looking into hush money payments made to two women who said they had affairs with Trump. Michael Cohen, Trump's former personal lawyer and fixer, arranged the payments, and pleaded guilty to federal campaign finance charges. He testified before Congress that Weisselberg came up with a strategy to hide the fact that the Trump Organization was reimbursing Cohen for making payments to one of the women, pornographic actress Stormy Daniels. Trump has called the investigation "a witch hunt." More stories from theweek.comHistorian: Biden's support for Amazon workers voting to unionize is 'almost unprecedented'The myth of the male bumblerTrump is back. Did anyone miss him?

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