• Foreign Reporter Shocked By Trump's 'Alarming Incoherence' On Border Wall Tour

    She wonders if cleaning up Trump's rambling speech does public a disservice.

  • Sussex Tour: Duke and Duchess urged to put Archie front and centre so public can 'refall in love with them'

    The Duke and Duchess of Sussex will embark tomorrow on a tour of southern Africa, needing to put baby son Archie at the front and centre if they wish the British public to ‘refall’ in love with them. The couple have seen much of the goodwill generated by their glamorous wedding a little over a year ago dissipated as a result of criticism of their spending habits; travel arrangements; and tales of a falling out between the Sussexes and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. The trip begins in Cape Town with a visit to a “female empowerment training” workshop in a local township and ends 10 days later with an audience in Johannesburg with South Africa’s president Cyril Ramaphosa and his wife Dr Tshepo Motsepe. In the middle part of the tour, the Duchess will stay in Cape Town with five-month-old Archie while the Duke will embark on an intrepid series of flights to Botswana, Angola and Malawi to highlight animal conservation and the remarkable campaign led by his mother Diana, Princess of Wales, in outlawing and clearing landmines. But Ingrid Seward, the doyenne of royal reporters and editor-in-chief of Majesty Magazine, said it was critical that the Duke and Duchess deploy Archie on the tour to win the public relations battle. Until now, the baby has been seen in only a handful of photographs. Royal insiders are being coy about when the baby will be seen on tour. There will be no ceremonial greeting for the Sussex family as they disembark their commercial flight in Cape Town on Monday and no events factored in where Archie will be guaranteed to appear. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor shortly after his birth  Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire Ms Seward, however, explained the child was key. “From a public relations point of view the Duke and Duchess really do need to show the people Archie. He is the best ticket they have got for getting people to refall in love with them,” said Ms Seward. “People are very susceptible to images of children. I don’t see the point of hauling him all the way there only to keep him under wraps.” This is the opportunity for the Duke and Duchess to alter the public perception that has dogged them in recent months. The refurbishment of Frogmore Cottage, their home on the Windsor estate, at a cost to the taxpayer of £2.4 million, has drawn gasps. Then there is the recent outcry and allegations of hypocrisy over their insistence that they wished to protect the planet while at the same time taking a series of private jet flights to and from the south of France and Ibiza. The tour of southern Africa will show the Duke and Duchess getting serious. They have chosen to avoid the obvious tourist attractions in Cape Town that includes Table Mountain, while Robben Island - susceptible to cancellation due to adverse weather - is also off the list. Nor are there glamorous parties or dinners, often a staple of a Royal tour, and it is noteworthy that their first engagement after they arrive is in a township.  Although the Duke will attend several receptions at British High Commissions to celebrate the UK's ties with the countries he is visiting, with the Duchess joining him in South Africa, there are few evening events in a programme designed in part to take into account the needs of Archie.  The decision will mean that royal-watchers will not see the Duchess in a tiara or other major pieces of jewellery borrowed from the Queen.  A source said the schedule reflected the couple's preference to " roll up their sleeves and do work in the community", adding: "The balance of the programme reflects their style of hands-on work."

  • Kevin Hart Likely To File Lawsuit Against Company Who Built His Barracuda

    Hart along with the other two people involved in the crash are said to be armed with lawyers.Whenever anything happens to a celebrity, whether it’s good, bad, major, or mundane, news circulates as fast as a dry Christmas tree going up in flames after being doused in gasoline. That’s what happened with one of the biggest names in Hollywood today, Kevin Hart, when his insanely modified 1970 Plymouth Barracuda dubbed Menace was involved in a major accident on Labor Day weekend which left the classic in a pile of twisted metal.Now that actor/comedian Kevin Hart has been released from the hospital after sustaining three fractures to his spine that required back surgery, it is said that he is now in the process of preparing a lawsuit against Speedkore, the company who built his beastly 720-horsepower Plymouth Barracuda that was powered by a modern 6.4L Hemi V8 and topped with a Whipple supercharger. In addition, the driver, Jared S. Black, and the backseat passenger who sustained minor injuries, have also hired lawyers due to the lack of safety equipment in the car which is said to have a roll cage, airbags, and five-point harnesses. They believe the addition of these safety features would have prevented their injuries.According to TMZ, the big issue is that Speedkore should have refused the job to Hart even if he wanted the custom car to come without safety equipment. TMZ contacted 10 different custom car companies to see if they would still offer cars without safety equipment considering the Hart crash, and 8 out of 10 said that they still would.The California Highway Patrol is still investigating the crash but talks of changing the laws revolving around classic cars are already in the works. If this legislation is approved, that means that all cars, no matter how old, must have seatbelts or harnesses installed to be legal and road worthy. While safety is no doubt a priority, these classics have been around for decades without any of these features. Also, this means drilling holes into million-dollar Concours cars just to add tacky seatbelts that will hardly ever be used. Plus, it is not unheard of for these laws to trickle over to other states. So, if Kevin Hart, and the two others involved in the crash, file lawsuits against SpeedKore over safety equipment, what impact will that have on the impending changes on California laws regarding safety restraints in muscle cars? No doubt it would have a negative impact for classic car owners that are forced to drill into their beloved classic cars to add features they have never been equipped with.It was Labor Day weekend when Hart threw the keys to his powerful '70 Barracuda over to his friend, Jared Black. A female passenger crammed in the back, although, it is unsure where she was sitting due to a rear seat delete. They set off for Mulholland drive, an infamous road known as "The Snake" that is notorious for bad accidents. It features twists and turns with large drop-offs on each side. Black lost control of the car on Mulholland where it went down an embankment and crashed through a wooden fence. Both Hart and Black suffered back injuries, and the woman with them suffered minor injuries.One should know what could go wrong when toying with a car of that caliber. Knowing the raw power it possesses, and still getting rowdy with it anyway should not be a fault of the manufacturer, but the fault of those knowing and getting in anyway. Even the rear passenger got in knowing that there was no seat for her to occupy. Source: TMZ Read More... * Watch A 1970 Chevy Chevelle LS6 Barn Find * One-Up Your Buddies With This Monster 1972 Chevy C50