• Celebrity
    The Telegraph

    Queen relaxes with a special horse ride in first public appearance since lockdown

    The Queen has been pictured horse riding in her first public appearance since lockdown began. Over the weekend she took Balmoral Fern, a 14-year-old fell pony, for a ride in the 655-acre Windsor Home Park. Her Majesty wore a headscarf featuring jockeys’ silks. Horse racing, of which the Queen is known to be a huge fan, begins again today after being stopped during the coronavirus lockdown. She has been with the Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle, where she spent her 94th birthday on April 21 in lockdown and has continued official duties. The Queen delivered her VE Day anniversary message to Britain from Windsor Castle last month, reminding the country to “never give up, never despair”. She recently sent her best wishes to this year’s “unique” virtual Chelsea Flower Show, commenting that her grandmother Queen Mary would have been delighted to know that gardening had become a national pastime.

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  • U.S.
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Police act like laws don't apply to them because of 'qualified immunity.' They're right.

    There's a legal obstacle that's nearly impossible to overcome when police officers and government officials violate our constitutional and civil rights.

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  • Celebrity
    Yahoo Celebrity

    Pamela Anderson wears her iconic 'Baywatch' swimsuit to hang out at home: 'It still fits'

    Pamela Anderson slips on the suit to surprise friends, she revealed in a new interview.

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  • World
    Reuters

    New coronavirus losing potency, top Italian doctor says

    The new coronavirus is losing its potency and has become much less lethal, a senior Italian doctor said on Sunday. "In reality, the virus clinically no longer exists in Italy," said Alberto Zangrillo, the head of the San Raffaele Hospital in Milan in the northern region of Lombardy, which has borne the brunt of Italy's coronavirus contagion. Italy has the third highest death toll in the world from COVID-19, with 33,415 people dying since the outbreak came to light on Feb. 21.

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  • Business
    Bloomberg

    U.S. Stock Futures Drop as Protests Grow; Yen Up: Markets Wrap

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. stock futures fell as investors weighed the violent protests in some American cities that have stoked concerns about a reacceleration in infection rates and a damper on the economic recovery.The yen and gold edged up. S&P 500 futures opened lower. With Amazon scaling back deliveries and Apple closing some stores Sunday, investors are gauging how violence over the weekend will affect the reopening of the world’s largest economy. Crude oil fell. China’s markets will be taking in President Donald Trump’s latest barrage of China criticism, which stopped short of tough sanctions over Hong Kong.Traders on Monday will also take stock of a slew of manufacturing PMIs due, including from South Korea and Taiwan, after Chinese data over the weekend showed a continued bumpy recovery. The demonstrations in the U.S. could add another layer of complexity after a two-month rally in global equities from March lows.“The reopening could be disrupted and that can affect local state economies that just began to emerge from the pandemic,” said Ben Emons, managing director for global macro strategy at Medley Global Advisors.Here are some key events coming up:Australia’s central bank is expected to keep its main policy programs unchanged on Tuesday. So too is the case for Canada, which has options to add stimulus but will probably stand pat on Wednesday to allow more time to evaluate the progress of policy action.In Europe, the ECB is expected to top up its rescue program with an additional 500 billion euros of asset purchases. Anything less than an expansion at Thursday’s meeting would be a big shock, Bloomberg Economics said.The U.S. labor market report on Friday will probably show American unemployment soared to 19.6% in May, the highest since the 1930s.These are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index declined 0.8% as of 7:04 a.m. in Tokyo. The index climbed 0.5% on Friday.Futures on Japan’s Nikkei 225 rose 1.1% on Friday, when Hang Seng futures advanced 0.6%. Futures on Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index slid 0.4%.CurrenciesThe yen rose 0.1% to 107.69 per dollar.The euro bought $1.1119, up 0.2%.The offshore yuan was steady at 7.1361 per dollar.The Australian dollar slid 0.1% to 66.58 U.S. cents.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries fell four basis points to 0.65% on Friday.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude fell 1.7% to $34.90 a barrel.Gold rose 0.3% to $1,736.52.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Business
    Business Insider

    Tesla shareholders will vote on whether the company should do something it's never done before: advertise

    Elon Musk has relied on media coverage and passionate customers to drive sales, but one investor wants more marketing.

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