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12-Year-Old George R.R. Martin's Letter to Marvel Comics

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12-Year-Old George R.R. Martin's Letter to Marvel Comics

Not that anyone in the seven kingdoms would dare question the nerd-cred of George R.R. Martin, but just in case somewhere north of the Wall there is a jester foolish enough to doubt that Martin, creator of Game of Thrones, wasn't interested in the fantastical from an early age, we provide you with this — proof solid enough to get even Tyrion off the hook.

In 1961, when he was 12, Martin wrote a fan letter to comic book legends Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. Martin's missive was published in an issue of Fantastic Four. The letter recently resurfaced on the Web.

[Related: We Recap the 'Game of Thrones' Season 4 Finale]

In it, George R. Martin (he apparently hadn't added the second "R" to his middle name) declares his love for the Marvel superheroes, and does so with impressive style. He wasn't yet a teenager, but already the kid knew how to write. Anybody who can use the phrase "By Gumbo" and get away with it is clearly destined to rule some sort of an empire.

But that's not all. Marvel recently re-published another letter that Martin wrote in regards to issues of The Avengers and Fanastic Four. In the letter, Martin heaps on the praise.

"After receiving and reading my subscription copies of FF #32 and Avengers #9, I have finally come to the decision to have both mounted in bronze and set on a pedestal in the center of my living room."

But while Martin was clearly happy with the comics, he wasn't shy about sneaking in some constructive criticism over the use of lame villains.

"... Some others like the Thinker, the Puppet Master, the Moleman and Diablo have definitely deserved eternal exile. These four are probably four of the poorest villains you have ever introduced, and it is somewhat ironic that all four should have been presented in F.F., your best mag."

Clearly Martin knew the importance of good bad guys and had the skill to deliver. The author would go onto create one of the most despised villains (that’s a compliment) in recent memory in Joffrey, the loathsome king. Stupid Joffrey! We hate you!

Follow Mike Krumboltz on Twitter (@mikekrumboltz).