Advertisement
Bringing It All Back Home

Bringing It All Back Home

1965 studio album by Bob Dylan
Bringing It All Back Home is the fifth studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released in March 1965 by Columbia Records.Wikipedia
GenrePop/Rock, Folk, Folk-Rock, Psychedelic/Garage, Blues-Rock, Singer/Songwriter, Rock & Roll, Contemporary Pop/Rock, Contemporary Folk, Album Rock, Political Folk
Release DateMarch 22, 1965
ArtistBob Dylan
Profile

Tracklist

  • 1Subterranean Homesick BluesBob Dylan2:24
    Listen on Apple Music
  • 2She Belongs to MeBob Dylan2:49
    Listen on Apple Music
  • 3Maggie's FarmBob Dylan3:54
    Listen on Apple Music
  • 4Love Minus Zero/No LimitBob Dylan2:54
    Listen on Apple Music
  • 5Outlaw BluesBob Dylan3:07
    Listen on Apple Music
  • 6On the Road AgainBob Dylan2:38
    Listen on Apple Music
  • 7Bob Dylan's 115th DreamBob Dylan6:32
    Listen on Apple Music
  • 8Mr. Tambourine ManBob Dylan5:33
    Listen on Apple Music
  • 9Gates of EdenBob Dylan5:44
    Listen on Apple Music
  • 10It's Alright, Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)Bob Dylan7:32
    Listen on Apple Music
  • 11It's All Over Now, Baby BlueBob Dylan4:12
    Listen on Apple Music

Apple and Apple Music are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries

More by Bob Dylan

Essential Johnny Cash 1955-1983
Essential Johnny Cash 1955-1983
2002
Back Room Blood
Back Room Blood
1996
Rare, Live & Classic
Rare, Live & Classic
1993
Crossroads
Crossroads
1988
No Reason to Cry
No Reason to Cry
1976
Doug Sahm and Band
Doug Sahm and Band
1973
Super Hits
Super Hits
2012
All Time Best: Reclam Musik Edition, Vol. 3
All Time Best: Reclam Musik Edition, Vol. 3
2007
Discover Bob Dylan
Discover Bob Dylan
2007
No Direction Home [Documentary]
No Direction Home [Documentary]
2006
Live at Carnegie Hall 1963
Live at Carnegie Hall 1963
2005
Live at the Gaslight 1962
Live at the Gaslight 1962
2005
Chronicles, Vol. 1
Chronicles, Vol. 1
2004
Grandes Exitos 2
Grandes Exitos 2
2004
Grandes Exitos
Grandes Exitos
2004
Classic Interviews 1965-1966
Classic Interviews 1965-1966
2003
Forevers Hits
Forevers Hits
2002
Postcards of the Hanging: The Grateful Dead Perform the Songs of Bob Dylan
Postcards of the Hanging: The Grateful Dead Perform the Songs of Bob Dylan
2002
Very Best of Bob Dylan [2000]
Very Best of Bob Dylan [2000]
2000
Masterpieces
Masterpieces
1998
From Newport to the Ancient Empty Street in LA
From Newport to the Ancient Empty Street in LA
1998

Top Stories

The classic Sixties album cover that betrayed Bob Dylan’s state of mind

  • Bob Dylan is an artist who seems to delight in inscrutability and the great singer-songwriter certainly has a baffling approach to album covers. Blonde on Blonde (from 1966) is celebrated for a blurred portrait assumed to represent the music’s druggy otherness, although photographer Jerry Schatzberg later claimed it was simply so cold in New York that he couldn’t stop his hands shaking. Actually, of Dylan’s 38 studio albums, at least half a dozen feature out-of-focus cover shots. Maybe he is just short sighted. This slap dash approach has extended to amateurish paintings by his own hand (notably Self Portrait in 1970 and Planet Waves in 1974), trashy pulp art (Shot of Love in 1981, Knocked Out Loaded in 1986) and some of the least flattering portraits in rock history (has a major artist ever looked so monumentally disinterested as Dylan on Good As I Been To You, 1992?). And yet, given his creative mystique and towering status in pop culture, Dylan’s covers are amongst the most iconic and minutely examined in rock history. One groundbreaking album, in particular, has been dissected and debated with forensic zeal. What is it? Bob Dylan’s fifth album Bringing it All Back Home from 1965 marked the moment the folk bard chose to go electric. The cover is a teasing cornucopia of clues as to the state of his mind. It is formally posed, reminiscent of the portraiture of Flemish painter Jan van Eyck, but also a pastiche of a celebrity lifestyle magazine: at home with the voice of a generation. Forsaking the folky earthiness of earlier albums, Dylan has swapped his rustic attire for a hipster shirt and black jacket. He stares with deadly intent at the camera, a Persian cat in his lap, whilst a glamorous woman in a red dress reclines with model imperiousness on a chaise longue.
Advertisement
Advertisement