Tearful Candace Cameron Bure Says Her 'Heart Hurts' for Families of Uvalde Shooting

·3 min read
Candace Cameron Bure
Candace Cameron Bure

Steven Ferdman/Getty Candace Cameron Bure

Candace Cameron Bure took a pause before addressing this week's school shooting in Uvalde, Texas.

On Thursday, after some of her followers reprimanded her for her silence regarding the tragedy, the former View panelist posted on her Instagram Story to explain why she hadn't posted earlier.

"Hi friends," said Cameron Bure, 46. "I wanted — actually, I didn't want to come on here, but I am because, you know, seeing what happened in our country — all of us process things differently, and some of us need more time to process it."

She continued, "Some of us are ready to scream and yell and shout from the rooftops. Some of us need to just feel more and figure out when we feel ready to share those feelings. I am a deep feeler, and I don't always feel like social media is the place I want to run to first to share my heart, particularly when it's grieving, and so that's why I've been silent."

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People sit on the curb outside of Robb Elementary School as State troopers guard the area in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022. - An 18-year-old gunman killed 14 children and a teacher at an elementary school in Texas on Tuesday, according to the state's governor, in the nation's deadliest school shooting in years.
People sit on the curb outside of Robb Elementary School as State troopers guard the area in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022. - An 18-year-old gunman killed 14 children and a teacher at an elementary school in Texas on Tuesday, according to the state's governor, in the nation's deadliest school shooting in years.

ALLISON DINNER/AFP via Getty

The Fuller House star had words for the people who have judged her for not posting anything about the Robb Elementary School shooting — which saw 19 school children and two teachers killed on Tuesday.

For more on the shooting massacre at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, listen below to our daily podcast PEOPLE Every Day.

"I don't think it's right to jump to conclusions or assume or judge someone for their lack of posting," she said. "I don't believe silence or lack of posting is a representation of what someone is thinking, feeling or doing. The more and more I have this relationship with social media, there are things I love about it, but there's a lot that I really am pulling away from and that is sharing certain things — particularly when it comes to tragedy, grief, politics, and a lot of social issues that our country disagrees on."

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Cameron Bure also said she feels her words are usually picked apart by followers, no matter the message. In all, though, she asked for time to grieve the losses and state of America in privacy.

"So, with the tragedy and the loss of those 21 people, that is so hard. And as a mother, I just grieve and I want to grieve with the people of Uvalde and the families," she said, with tears in her eyes. "My heart just hurts for you, but that's all I want to say on social media right now. I'm just here and I'm grieving with you."

"And I know some of you are going to say well, there was another tragic event that happened to Buffalo in the supermarket, and I'm grieving those people, too," Cameron Bure added. "Just some of us don't always feel comfortable to, like, have to post everything."

ABC's "The View" - CANDACE CAMERON BURE
ABC's "The View" - CANDACE CAMERON BURE

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Cameron Bure, who was part of The View's panel as a conservative voice in 2015 and 2016, has been vocal about strict gun laws in the past. She called for more gun regulation following the San Bernardino, California, shooting that killed 16 people in 2015.

According to The Wrap, she said at the time, "Here's where I stand: Listen, I'm a conservative person, and I believe in our Second Amendment rights, but there has to be something that is sensible between both parties that people who are allowed to get guns should have training and shouldn't be on lists, and they need to come to a common ground and have some sensible gun laws while still protecting our Second Amendment rights."