NC sheriff under investigation for racist video + Explaining NC’s different weapons laws

Hey, everyone! Drew here. Hope you are all staying safe and prepared for the storm this weekend.

A new episode of “Sports Legends of the Carolinas” dropped yesterday. Scott Fowler chatted with former Panthers tight end Wesley Walls about his time with Carolina, Kevin Greene, the day he got fired and more.

You can find new and past episodes of “Sports Legends of the Carolinas” on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and all podcast platforms now.

On to the news for Thursday. Enjoy!

1. SBI investigates NC sheriff accused of making racist comments, targeting Black deputies

Columbus County Sheriff Jody Greene was elected in 2018.
Columbus County Sheriff Jody Greene was elected in 2018.

A North Carolina sheriff is under fire after he appeared to use racist language in reference to Black deputies in a recording.

The State Bureau of Investigation is looking into allegations of obstruction of justice by the Columbus County Sheriff Jody Greene and deputies under his command, a spokeswoman for the agency said today. A local TV station first published the video featuring Greene’s comments.

“I’m sick of these Black bastards,” Greene said, according to the video recording. “I’m going to clean house and be done with it.”

Greene’s comments were in reference to his suspicion that some of the Black deputies are loyal to the previous sheriff, Lewis Hatcher.

Carli Brosseau has more on the SBI’s investigation into the matter.

2. Beyond guns: What else does NC law prohibit with weapons?

The Transportation Security Administration displays Thursday May 26, 2016, a few of the items TSA screeners found in carry on luggage at RDU International Airport last year. The TSA says they stopped 1,200 pounds of voluntarily abandoned property including knives, brass knuckles and a host of other items.
The Transportation Security Administration displays Thursday May 26, 2016, a few of the items TSA screeners found in carry on luggage at RDU International Airport last year. The TSA says they stopped 1,200 pounds of voluntarily abandoned property including knives, brass knuckles and a host of other items.

A recent incident involving a student at UNC Charlotte has many curious about North Carolina’s weapons laws.

While guns often are the focus in much legislation, there are laws on the books here in N.C. that apply to knives and even stun guns. From concealed and open carry laws to weapons used for hunting, the nuance around the matter can be confusing.

While majority of residents must follow these laws, there are some exemptions for law enforcement officers and members of the military.

Mary Ramsey dives into the details and shares what you need to know.

3. Charlotte Black businesses are less likely to receive prime city contracts, study shows

The Charlotte City Council stands after swearing in at the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Government Center in Charlotte, N.C., Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022.
The Charlotte City Council stands after swearing in at the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Government Center in Charlotte, N.C., Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022.

A new study shows Black businesses have fewer opportunities in the Charlotte area.

Black entrepreneurs are less likely to receive prime contracts with the city of Charlotte as compared with other minority-and women-owned businesses. Colette Holt & Associates, a law and consulting firm specializing in business and contracting equity, conducted the nearly two-year long disparity study.

The number of minority-owned businesses with the capacity to handle city contracts was compared to how the city hires to determine what percentage of businesses are getting contracts.

The Charlotte City Council voted 9-2 Monday to accept these findings. Members Ed Driggs and Tariq Bokhari vote no, citing legal concerns and the report’s methodology.

DJ Simmons has the full story on the results of the study.

4. CMS identifies why only 8.2% of students are college and career ready in math

Gov. Roy Cooper has urged N.C. school districts to begin offering in-person learning again. CMS students will begin returning to the classroom on Monday, Feb. 15.
Gov. Roy Cooper has urged N.C. school districts to begin offering in-person learning again. CMS students will begin returning to the classroom on Monday, Feb. 15.

Students in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools system are behind the curve when it comes to math skills.

According to a progress report presented to the school board on Wednesday, chronic student absenteeism is the likely culprit that led to just 8.2% of students in grades 9-12 to be considered college and career ready in math.

That number is well below the board of education’s goal of 16.5% for the end of this year and a 25% target by October 2024.

CMS leaders point to students not attending school as a primary reason math scores are low. In the 2021-22 year, 41% of high school students that did not score college and career ready on the Math 1 test were chronically absent. Just 12% of college-and-career-ready students in Math 1 were chronically absent.

Anna Maria Della Costa explains the report’s findings.

5. Some more stories to read

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Drew Nantais is a Senior Growth & Engagement Producer for the Charlotte Observer.
Drew Nantais is a Senior Growth & Engagement Producer for the Charlotte Observer.