What is your personal pop culture resolution for 2022?

·4 min read
Graphic:  Libby McGuire, Photo:  iStock
Graphic: Libby McGuire, Photo: iStock

As we look to the new year, it’s now time to ask the annual question:

What’s your personal pop culture resolution for 2022?

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Sample more

Sample more

My personal resolution for 2022 is the same as my professional one: Sample more. The last couple of years of sufficiency-level spiritual living have seen my pop culture consumption habits veer wildly between intense, all-consuming dives into new stuff, and the creature comforts of returning to old podcasts and previously viewed seasons of Taskmaster. My goal for 2022 is to broaden out and dip more widely into shows, music, games, etc. that I might not have indulged in, and then—and this is the key bit—walk away if I don’t like them very much. Moderation in 2022, baby. [William Hughes]

Watch 100 movies

Photo:  Paul Kaye; Cordaiy Photo Library Ltd./CORBIS/Corbis (Getty Images)
Photo: Paul Kaye; Cordaiy Photo Library Ltd./CORBIS/Corbis (Getty Images)

Watch 100 movies

I’ve never been an avid movie watcher and have mainly stuck to binging television shows and doing deep dives into albums, but this year I want to watch 100 movies, new or old. Growing up, neither an interest or attention span was cultivated in my household for films. As a result, there are a lot of “classics” across genres I have not seen. I subscribed to the Criterion Channel late last year, which gives me a real reason to watch foreign and older films, because otherwise I’d just be wasting money to impress film Twitter. Heck, maybe I’ll even write my first film piece this year, which makes this a personal and professional resolution. [Gabrielle Sanchez]

Watch more international TV that isn’t anime

Watch more international TV that isn’t anime

I watch a fair amount of Japanese TV, be it anime or my beloved Terrace House, but over the holidays I branched out to other non-English television and gave Netflix’s enormous international hit La Casa De Papel (sorry, that’s “Money Heist” if you want the terrible Americanized title) and found it to be a lot of fun. So, this year, I’d like to watch more international TV that isn’t anime. I mean, I’m going to watch a lot of anime either way. I don’t need to give myself credit for it. [Sam Barsanti]

Read one book a month

Cover image: William Morrow
Cover image: William Morrow

Read one book a month from that “stack of books I keep meaning to get to.”

We all have it—the stack of books we keep meaning to get around to. And yes, once in a while we’ll pull one out, read it, and feel inordinately proud of ourselves, even though we’ve added three additional books to the stack in the interim. There’s no one cause; personally, I tend to end up reading mostly stuff that’s just come out, in part for work reasons, but it means the older books gathering dust always get short shrift. So here’s my resolution: I’m going to read one book a month from my “stack of books I keep meaning to get to.” That will only cut the size of the pile roughly in half (and let’s be honest, I’ll almost certainly add a few more books to it throughout the year), but it’s a noble-enough start. First up? Paul Tremblay’s short story collection, Growing Things. [Alex McLevy]

Re-open myself up to being surprised with the TV I watch

Re-open myself up to being surprised with the TV I watch

Over the past few years, I’ve developed a habit of bailing early on shows that don’t give me the instant gratification I’m looking for in the first two episodes. Why watch a show that is rough around the edges when there’s likely a show that’s a bit more fully formed right around the corner? (I think this is partly due to having access to more TV than ever before) But one of the joys of TV is watching a show find its footing over the course of its first season and grow into something truly great—think Parks And Recreation, Legends Of Tomorrow, or BoJack. Which is why I’ve resolved myself to give more shows a chance past the first two episodes, and let myself be surprised by TV again. [Baraka Kaseko]

Support local writers and authors

Support local writers and authors

In general, I’d like to support creators/creatives more: Don’t just idly stream a new album, purchase it; pre-order a buzzy book instead of relying on a galley, etc. This year, though, I’m going to focus on supporting local writers and authors. This can take a lot of forms, including keeping a Block Club Chicago subscription. There’s also an abundance of newsletters to subscribe to; The A.V. Club’s own Ines Bellina writes a Substack that includes a great interview series, “How I Got My Agent.” I’m open to more recommendations, but I’ll also be supporting the Chicago Humanities Festival, which hosts events like this joyous celebration of Illinois Poet Laureate Angela Jackson. [Danette Chavez]