Orphaned orangutans need a good Christmas

Give the perfect gift this holiday season by adopting an orangutan

NEW YORK, Nov. 30, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Need a new gift idea for Christmas, especially for the person who has too much "stuff?" Adopting an orangutan is the perfect way to make a meaningful difference in the world. It shows you care – in more ways than one.

The Orangutan Project states adopting an orangutan is the perfect way to make a meaningful difference in the world. Pictured here are Asto and Asih, two young, orphaned orangutans in a Sumatran rescue center.
The Orangutan Project states adopting an orangutan is the perfect way to make a meaningful difference in the world. Pictured here are Asto and Asih, two young, orphaned orangutans in a Sumatran rescue center.

Asto and Asih, two young, orphaned orangutans in a Sumatran rescue center, need support to help them attend Jungle School. But why do orangutans go to school? One simple reason: their survival depends on it. Without Jungle School, Asto and Asih can never return to the wild.

The reason is that orangutans are not born with survival instincts; instead, they learn everything from their mothers. They can't climb trees or swing through the forest unless their mothers teach them how. They have no idea which foods are safe to eat unless their mothers show them.

But Asto and Asih, who were rescued from illegal wildlife traders in 2021, don't have mothers.

"We believe their moms were killed when wildlife traders took the babies," says Kylie Bullo, who manages adoptions with The Orangutan Project. "If the rescuers hadn't arrived in time, these infants would have been sold into a life of captivity and misery."

Although they're very cute, orangutans don't make good pets. They are not meant to walk around on the ground or eat human food, and they can become quite sick if they're kept away from freedom and fresh fruits and leaves in the forest.

"These little ones had a traumatic start to life, but thanks to the carers at our rescue center, they're recovering well and going from strength to strength," Bullo said.

With Christmas just around the corner, adopting these little bubs could be the perfect gift for animal-lovers.

"Asto and Asih will stay in their rescue center with their dedicated carers, but through an adoption, you and your loved ones will become an important part of their family." said Bullo.

Through an ongoing monthly gift, supporters will help give Asto and Asih the love and care they're missing from their moms. Adoptions provide breakfast, lunch and dinner every day for these young orangutans, including their favorite foods of milk and watermelon.

Support also goes to their "surrogate moms" who care for them round-the-clock, providing food, medical care, Jungle School and the thing the miss most from their mothers – cuddles.

Find out all about Asto and Asih here and take a peek at other orangutans you can adopt.

Give someone the perfect eco-friendly gift that will delight them and spread love to vulnerable young orangutans.

For more information about adopting Asto and Asih and The Orangutan Project's work to save orangutans, contact Vicki Renner on vicki.renner@orangutan.org.au or visit The Orangutan Project.

About The Orangutan Project

The Orangutan Project was established in 1998 with a critical mission; to ensure that Critically Endangered orangutan species are protected against Extinction and will continue to live in viable wild populations for generations to come. Today, The Orangutan Project is a dynamic, fast-growing and successful non-profit organization that has raised over $25 million to support a wide range of critical projects that address the holistic problem facing fragmented orangutan populations - including fighting deforestation and habitat loss at the highest level. Find out more at www.theorangutanproject.org.

About Leif Cocks

Leif Cocks began his career as a zoo keeper, curator and small population biologist at a zoo, and has worked hands on with orangutans for more than 25 years, including establishing the most successful breeding colony of orangutans in the world. Leif is highly regarded as a world-renowned expert on orangutans, publishing several papers in peer-reviewed journals on orangutans and also serving on numerous boards and technical advisory groups. He is the author of a number of books including Finding Our Humanity and Orangutans My Cousins, My Friends. In 2019 Leif was awarded the Order of Australia Medal (OAM) from the Australian Government, and his university's highest award, the John Curtin Medal, for his dedication to species conservation.

About Kylie Bullo

Kylie Bullo began her career as a biologist and zookeeper and has worked with The Orangutan Project in the role of Project Manager for over 20 years. Along with Leif Cocks, she has been instrumental in facilitating orangutan rescues, successfully reintroducing orangutans to the wild, and enhancing forest conservation in Borneo and Sumatra. Together, Kylie and Leif were involved in releasing the first ever zoo-born orangutan into the wild, which she wrote about in her book Reaching for the Canopy.

Media Contact 
Vicki Renner 
Digital Content Editor 
The Orangutan Project 
+61433 941 010 
vicki.renner@orangutan.org.au

Media Contact
Heather Ripley
Orange Orchard
(865) 977-1973
hripley@orangeorchardpr.com

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SOURCE The Orangutan Project