Letters to the editor, Jan. 23

·4 min read

No evidence or logic to 'stolen election' claims

Kevin Wingate's recent letter repeats tired claims of a stolen presidential election while citing no actual evidence, which is to be expected since there isn't any. Repeated election recounts in states like Georgia and Arizona and over 60 court challenges (many before Trump-appointed judges) produced no evidence of election fraud.

Wingate's claim is also illogical. For example, if Democrats were smart enough to steal the presidency by getting millions of fake ballots counted without leaving a trace, why weren't they smart enough to use the lower boxes on those same fake ballots to steal a few seats in the Senate and House of Representatives (as a ploy to help Biden get his legislative agenda through Congress)?

Wingate's second failure of logic is his assumption that the millions of additional Democratic votes had to be enthusiastic votes for Biden. Trump's inept leadership in response to COVID put us in an economic depression during most of 2020, very different than the rosy claim Wingate makes. That plus Trump's lies, divisiveness, and long history of corrupt business practices make it logical that many Biden votes (perhaps millions of them) were simply "anybody but Trump" votes. If Wingate and others in thrall to made-up conspiracies about stolen elections would simply use evidence and logic reality might be easier for them to understand and accept.

David Perkins

Muncie

The Big Lie

There are winners and losers in every election and the very concept of democracy involves the loser accepting those results.

In the months leading up to the 2020 election, Trump told his base that the only way he could lose the election was if it were rigged. Unless you’re the Super Bowl champs playing against a mediocre high school team, how could anyone in any competition make such a claim?

Historically, the percentage of supporters for either party is about equal. It’s those people who identify as “independent” who decide our elections. Obviously, a great number of independent voters were tired of the scandal and drama and voted for a change.

Fox News and conservative talk radio continue to enrage Trump supporters with lies about “the big steal." Many conservatives believe these lies and feel the insurrection of our Capitol was spearheaded by Democrats in an effort to tarnish their hero’s image.

Spineless GOP members of Congress are so afraid of the MAGA base that they choose trashing our democracy over admitting the truth. Their only plan is to attack the voting rights of their opponents.

An Arizona audit conducted by conservatives cost its taxpayers nearly $6 million and only increased Biden’s margin of victory, which incidentally was 7 million nationwide. Meanwhile, dozens of judges, many nominated by the ex-president, admirably chose constitution over con man, democracy over dictatorship.

Bill Grobey

Muncie

The right types

There are types of rights: social/constitutional rights and personal rights. A social or constitutional right affects everybody. A personal right does not. If an American male, I can dress my body with a tie, or not. Also, I can get a big banana tattooed on my body even if my mother objects.

Now, a social right is very different. For example in the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness you cannot take my puppy to make you happy. A social right thus comes with a responsibility to others.

I ask peoples their reason for not vaccinating against COVID. This non-action causes a deeply troubled economy, the death of thousands and throws lives of millions of our citizenry into irreparable chaos and grief!

In fascist nations the rulers act not for their people, but only for themselves. What say you, unvaccinated?!

Flo Lapin

Muncie

How to send a letter to the editor

Letters to the Public Letter Box should be emailed to letters@muncie.gannett.com. You must include your name, address and a telephone number for verification. Letters that cannot be verified will not be used.

By submitting a letter, the writer grants The Star Press the right to publish, distribute, archive or use it in print, online or other format. Letters must be 250 words or fewer and will be edited for length, grammar, accuracy and clarity. Letters containing private solicitations; unfair criticism of private individuals, businesses or organizations; poetry or inappropriate language will not be used. Form letters will not be used. Letters of more than 250 words may be rejected. In general, publication of letters from the same writer will be limited to once a quarter.

Anyone wishing to submit a guest column should contact Robin Gibson at rgibson@muncie.gannett.com at least a week in advance.

This article originally appeared on Muncie Star Press: Muncie letters to the editor, Jan. 23