Jon Bon Jovi says he doesn't take his privilege as 'white, affluent male' for granted

Amy Johnson
·2 mins read
Jon Bon Jovi awaits the arrival of Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex at the Abbey Road Studios where the Invictus Games Choir are recording a special single in aid of the Invictus Games Foundation on February 28, 2020 in London, England. (Photo by Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)
Jon Bon Jovi awaits the arrival of Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex at the Abbey Road Studios where the Invictus Games Choir are recording a special single in aid of the Invictus Games Foundation on February 28, 2020 in London, England. (Photo by Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)

Jon Bon Jovi has said he recognises the privilege he holds in the world as a celebrity and "white, older affluent male".

It comes as the singer has recorded song American Reckoning for his latest album which deals with the death of murdered black man George Floyd in the US and the Black Lives Matter movement.

The track from the album, which is titled 2020, features the lyrics: “I’ll never know what it’s like / To walk a mile in his shoes / And I’ll never have to have the talk / So it don’t happen to you.”

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Bon Jovi believes he has educated himself on privilege through his charity work with his own Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation that deals with hunger and homelessness in the US.

Jon Bon Jovi and his wife Dorothea smile after opening the BEAT centre in Toms River, New Jersey, on May 10, 2016. The Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean Counties, Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation and Peoples Pantry announced the opening of BEAT, a place where families and individuals can access food, job training and resources to help end the cyclical causes of hunger. (AFP / Jewel SAMAD via Getty Images)
Jon Bon Jovi and his wife Dorothea smile after opening the BEAT centre in Toms River, New Jersey, on May 10, 2016. The Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean Counties, Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation and Peoples Pantry announced the opening of BEAT, a place where families and individuals can access food, job training and resources to help end the cyclical causes of hunger. (AFP / Jewel SAMAD via Getty Images)

The 58-year-old said: “This isn’t new to me. I understand that I was born in a time and in a place and with a skin colour that I would have many more benefits of the doubt.

“I know that I am privileged. I know that I am fortunate. I know that as a white, older affluent male, who happens to also be a celebrity, chances are if I can getting pulled over by a cop it’s to get in the motorcade on the way to the show.

“So I got that and I don’t take that for granted. I am lucky.”

Jon Bon Jovi performs onstage at the Samsung annual charity gala 2017 at Skylight Clarkson Sq on November 2, 2017 in New York City.  (Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Samsung)
Jon Bon Jovi performs onstage at the Samsung annual charity gala 2017 at Skylight Clarkson Sq on November 2, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Samsung)

The album takes a looks at modern America with other songs addressing gun control, tainted political discourse and PTSD in the military.

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It was originally slated for release in May this year but was it was put on hold for a number of months due top the coronavirus pandemic.

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