The Everest Foundation Praises New Atherosclerosis Research

Albert Einstein College of Medicine gets funds from The Everest Foundation, a venture philanthropy organization chiefly operating in graduate medical education and medical research.

Los Angeles, California, USA, May 24, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) --

A picture of a medical researcher looking through a microscope, representing research funded by The Everest Foundation
A picture of a medical researcher looking through a microscope, representing research funded by The Everest Foundation

Good Guy News reports on The Everest Foundaiton funding new artherosclerosis research.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine has received funds from The Everest Foundation, a venture philanthropy organization chiefly operating in graduate medical education and medical research.

The Everest Foundation has partnered up with the prestigious and research-intensive medical school to recognize the latter's groundbreaking research and innovation in the prevention of atherosclerosis, clogged arteries, known as a major cause of strokes and heart attacks.

Recent research conducted at the Alber Einstein College by a team of scientists spearheaded by Dr. Anna Maria Cuervo has found a new strategy that can be highly protective against atherosclerosis in the future. This strategy can dramatically bring down the rates of heart attacks and strokes in humans.

Researchers found that it is possible to minimize clogged artery plaque by boosting chaperone-mediated autophagy. According to Dr. Cuervo, recent research has proven that increasing chaperone-mediated autophagy activity, which typically declines with age, can go a long way in curbing atherosclerosis and keeping it in check or preventing it.

Moreover, research has also found a way to boost chaperone-mediated autophagy activity in human beings.

Now, to put it into context, it is known that cardiovascular diseases happen to be the leading cause of death globally, and strokes and heart attacks account for over 80 percent of those cardiovascular deaths.

As such, finding effective prevention for atherosclerosis caused by plaque buildup within the walls of arteries is sure to help reduce cardiovascular deaths dramatically, including strokes and heart attacks.

It must also be mentioned here that these recent findings in atherosclerosis prevention fruits of continued research spans decades.

For example, Dr. Cuervo discovered chaperone-mediated autophagy and defined it as a cellular housekeeping process back in 1993 and named the process chaperone-mediated autophagy in the year 2000.

Finally, it merits mention here that Resident Research Fellow Dr. Yerra, specializing in pain and rehabilitative medicine, was a prominent member of the current research team.

Dr. Yerra is an alumnus of Einstein College of Medicine and is currently working as a research fellow at Einstein Montefiore Medical Center, an institute with significant investment in the local community and whose residency and fellowship programs are heavily funded by The Everest Foundation.

In this connection, we must mention that The Everest Foundation, in addition to partnering with many of the top research-intensive medical colleges and institutions across the country, also invests heavily in local healthcare facilities that promote and are involved in grassroots research in the medical field.

According to Dr. Michael Everest and Agata Everest, two individuals at the non-profit’s helm, The Everest Foundation makes it a point to support these smaller and often cash-strapped health facilities through significant monetary contributions.

Agata Everest and Dr. Michael Everest’s goal is to help local grassroots research thrive and ensure that these initiatives do not suffer or come to a halt because of a lack of resources.

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