Dermot O'Leary urges men to not lose hope of becoming a father after struggle to conceive

Lauren Clark
·2 mins read
Dermot O'Leary and wife Dee recently welcomed a baby son. (Getty Images)
Dermot O'Leary and wife Dee recently welcomed a baby son. (Getty Images)

Earlier this year, Dermot O’Leary’s wife Dee wrote in an honest Instagram post about it being a “rocky road” to her falling pregnant.

Now, the 47-year-old TV presenter – who welcomed son Kasper in June – has urged other men not to give up hope of becoming fathers.

Speaking to The Sun’s Fabulous, the star wants other couples to “just keep going” if they’re struggling to conceive.

He said: “Don’t lose hope. Just keep going and you’ll find resolution one way or another, whether it’s through adoption or IVF or whatever.

"Because if you really want to be a parent and you want to bring a kid up in a loving, nurturing and supportive household, then you should do your utmost to do so.

“And I know it’s very easy to say these things, because none of that is science. But there are always ways.”

O’Leary married his 41-year-old wife, who is a producer and director, in 2012.

Elsewhere in the interview, he discussed the “special” time he’s experienced getting to grips with being a dad thanks to being at home more due to the coronavirus pandemic.

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It comes after Jessie J hinted at her fertility struggles, and revealed she hopes to become a mother one day.

Uploading a sweet snap of herself as a baby to social media to celebrate International Mother’s Day in May, the singer, 32, went on to applaud all mothers while also vowing to try to realise her own dreams of becoming a mother.

The star wrote: “Women are INCREDIBLE! I love you ALL. This is me when I was a baby. One day. I will be a mother.”

She continued: “Mothers who have 1 child, Mothers who have 10+ children, Mothers who have adopted, Mothers who have fostered, Mothers who haven’t yet but want to one day, Mothers who know they can but are struggling.

“Mothers freezing eggs for when the time is right, Mothers doing endless rounds of IVF, Mothers who are younger, Mothers who are older, Mothers who are still trying, Mothers who are expecting, Mothers who have just become a mother.”