'White supremacy is as Canadian as maple syrup': #AsACanadian trend reveals Canada is not immune to U.S. Capitol-type attacks

Elisabetta Bianchini
·5 min read

Canadians watched the frightening scene as a mob of pro-Donald Trump rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, leading to responses of horror and sadness.

American Dr. Janni Aragon is currently the Director of Technology and Society at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, with a history in teaching gender studies and political science. Aragon told Yahoo Canada she is “disappointed” with the U.S. Capitol chaos, particularly with how police seemingly used “kid gloves” against these domestic terrorists.

“We've witnessed with the protests after George Floyd was murdered, during the [Brett] Kavanaugh hearings and once he was appointed to the Supreme Court, the tough if not militaristic response that the police and other state authorities had against these protesters,” she said. “Let alone the way in which Black Lives Matters protesters have been treated when their attempt was to have non-violent protest.”

“This is a great, and I use ‘great’ in a negative way, example of white male privilege and what it is afforded because make no mistake, if this was a Black Lives Matter organized protest they would have never made it in the door, and the number of fatalities and injured would have another zero. It wouldn’t be four dead, it would be 40 dead and...hundreds jailed or incarcerated.”

Dr. Aragon agreed with people on social media calling out that what happened in the U.S. could happen in Canada.

Many Canadians were quick to point that out with “As a Canadian” trending on Twitter on Wednesday.

If fact, a number of smaller demonstrations occurred on Wednesday as the attack went on at the U.S. Capitol.

In Toronto, a group of vehicles advertised as “Canadians for President Trump” with “stop the steal” messaging moved across city streets.

Demonstrators with Trump and Canadian flags also gathered in at the Vancouver Art Gallery on Wednesday, moving near the U.S. consulate and the Trump Hotel.

The protest turned violent with CBC News photographer Ben Nelms being assaulted by a protester who charged at him and punched him in the face.

"He was upset that I, along with other members of the media, were taking pictures and reporting the event," Nelms said in a CBC News story. "Physical violence against members of the media is wrong and doesn't just happen outside of Canada, but here in Vancouver."

Similar events occurred in Alberta with protesters present in both Calgary and Red Deer. People were holding signs that read statements including “Canadians for Trump,” “drain the swamp” and “we are part of the Trump train.”

Trump supporters participate in a rally Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021 in Toronto downtown, Canada. Demonstrators took to the streets for a Trump rally in Toronto in support of the 45th president of the United States.  (Photo by Sayed Najafizada/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Trump supporters participate in a rally Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021 in Toronto downtown, Canada. Demonstrators took to the streets for a Trump rally in Toronto in support of the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Sayed Najafizada/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Hate groups in Canada and the impact of social media

Back in June 2020, the Institute for Strategic Dialogue published a report that indicated in recent years, the number of hate groups operating in Canada has tripled.

“Central to this increase in activity is the use of social media,” the report reads.

“It provides avenues for a broad spectrum of right-wing extremists to mobilize by recruiting new members, broadcasting disinformation and propaganda, harassing opponents, and co-ordinating activity including publicity stunts, protests and acts of violence.”

The Institute for Strategic Dialogue identified 6,600 Canadian right-wing extremist channels, pages, groups and accounts across Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Iron March, Fascist Forge, 4chan and Gab.

U.S. President Donald Trump has now been banned from Facebook and Instagram and was blocked by Twitter on Wednesday night after concerns about him provoking violence, but Dr. Aragon agreed these actions are “a little too late.”

“We have learned so much during these last four years, in terms of unfettered access to the media with lots of lies, or misinformation being spread at the hands of not only the president but his acolytes,” she said. “There's lots of lies being told and so I'm looking forward to a breath of fresh air with the next administration.”

“Seeing people be more responsible...elected officials both in Canada and the U.S., being more responsible with what they tweet or post on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok.”

Dr. Aragon added that she has been “energized” to see Millennials and Generation Z ok TikTok “giving receipts” for what officials are doing.