Bad Bunny Reveals He's Taking Break in 2023 to 'Enjoy My Achievements': 'We're Going to Celebrate'

Bad Bunny Billboard magazine
Bad Bunny Billboard magazine

Meredith Jenks Bad Bunny

After playing for hundreds of thousands of fans in just a few months and releasing Un Verano Sin Ti to all-around acclaim this year, Bad Bunny is ready for some well-deserved rest in 2023.

The music superstar, 28, revealed to Billboard in their latest cover story that he'll be "taking a break" in 2023 to focus on himself.

"2023 is for me, for my physical health, my emotional health to breathe, enjoy my achievements," Benito explained. "We're going to celebrate. Let's go here, let's go there, let's go on the boat. I have a couple of sporadic commitments, and I'll go to the studio, but there's no pressure. Remember yourself, cabrón. You've worked your ass off."

RELATED: Bad Bunny, Taylor Swift and Drake Are the Most-Streamed Artists on Spotify Globally

Bad Bunny Billboard magazine
Bad Bunny Billboard magazine

Meredith Jenks Bad Bunny

For Billboard's No. 1's issue, Bunny spoke about his monstrous year — including his handful of touring milestones. Specifically, the Puerto Rican musician explained what it meant to see the El Último Tour del Mundo tour hit larger venues in comparison to his last time on the road, pointing out the "flip" that he saw in his career at that time.

"My career has had many flips, many points of inflection where I'm here, and then suddenly I'm there. So that tour was very, very cabrona, very euphoric," he said. "When I went to the stadiums, my only point of reference was the stadium shows in Puerto Rico [in December 2021]. Those two shows in Puerto Rico were hard, hard, hard. I aged three years, I swear. I enjoyed it in the end, but there was a lot of pressure."

"And I thought this tour would be the same, but from the very first show in Orlando, it has been so much fun," Bunny continued. "I generally don't go out much, but on this tour — both in the U.S. and here — I've spent time with the crew and the dancers, we've gone out to dinner, it has been more chill. I've tried to really enjoy the moment."

Bad Bunny Billboard magazine
Bad Bunny Billboard magazine

Meredith Jenks Bad Bunny

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While his set list is over 40 songs long when he tours the world, the musician admits that it could be "longer" given his string of recent hits. "There's a lot of songs I don't perform, like the songs from El Último Tour. But yeah, in terms of vocals, it's me performing because I don't have backup singers," he said. "The show is long because the hits pile up. I sing practically the entire Un Verano Sin Ti. I just get up there, I go out to have fun, and if the audience is with me, I could sing all night. Real."

Bad Bunny Billboard magazine
Bad Bunny Billboard magazine

Meredith Jenks Bad Bunny

RELATED: American Music Awards 2022 — See the Complete Winners List!

Among his numerous milestones in 2022, perhaps Bunny's greatest are his gargantuan streaming numbers. The charting giant was the most-streamed global artist on Spotify this year — for the third year in a row, at that. With more than 18.5 billion streams in 2022, largely thanks to his No. 1 LP Un Verano Sin Ti (also the most-streamed global album), Bunny doubled his streams from the year prior.

Taylor Swift trailed closely behind, with Drake coming in third place for most-streamed artists globally, and first for most-streamed artists in the United States.

Speaking with to Billboard, Benito also opened up about his "spontaneous" experience collaborating with Drizzy, four years after the pair linked up for 2018 cut "MÍA." As he explained, working with a fellow superstar like Drake isn't entirely different from working with anyone else.

"For me, a collaboration is almost like, I don't want to sound like an a–hole, but it's almost like having sex with someone," Bunny said. "Making a song is a serious matter. You're saying things, and you're with someone, and it's not going to go away. It's there forever; it's not like pressing "delete" if you change your mind. At the end of the day, collaborating with Drake, or whoever, is as special as a collab with Buscabulla, or Chencho, or Rauw [Alejandro], or Jhayco. Each has a specific moment and a specific feeling."