US views on child immigrant crisis, at a glance

The Associated Press
Associated Press

U.S. communities have diverged greatly on their attitude toward sheltering throngs of unaccompanied Central American children who have crossed the border from Mexico since October. Here's a look at how things are playing out across the country:

6/20: Federal officials canceled a plan to bring in hundreds of underage Central American migrants to a shuttered private school in Lawrenceville, Virginia, after residents expressed their opposition.

6/28: A judge announced as many as 2,000 unaccompanied immigrant children could be transported from the Texas-Mexico border to three temporary housing facilities in Dallas County by the end of July.

7/1: In Murrieta, California, Homeland Security buses carrying migrant children and families were rerouted to a facility in San Diego after American flag-waving protesters blocked the group from reaching a suburban processing center.

7/9: The city council of League City, Texas, a Houston suburb, passed a resolution saying the city will not cooperate with any federal request to house immigrant children who are in the country illegally.

7/14: Someone spray-painted a former Army Reserve Center in Westminster, Maryland that was under consideration with graffiti saying: 'No illeagles here. No undocumented Democrats.'

7/15: About 50 people with U.S. flags, rifles and handguns turned out in Vassar, Michigan, about 70 miles northwest of Detroit, to protest a social service organization's proposal to house child migrants in a training center.

7/16: Protesters in Oracle, Arizona waved "Return to Sender" signs, shoved a group of mariachi musicians and waited for a bus of immigrant children that the local sheriff told them would arrive. At one point, they briefly halted a bus before realizing it was carrying children from a YMCA.

7/17: In a letter to President Obama, Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner asked that the federal government's relocation from the U.S.-Mexico border to shelters in the upstate New York community be expedited.

7/18: An emotional Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick proposed two possible locations to temporarily shelter as many as 1,000 unaccompanied children crossing the nation's southern border.