Ukrainians using e-bikes mounted with missiles to blow up Russian tanks

·2 min read
The bikes have been modified to hold the anti-tank missiles. (electrek)
The bikes have been modified to hold the anti-tank missiles. (electrek)

Ukrainians have been forced to turn every aspect of their life into methods of fighting the Russians, leading to some innovative weapons and tactics developed from everyday civilian items.

In something more reminiscent of a video game or action movie it has been reported that Ukrainian soldiers have been using e-bikes armed with missiles to take out Russian tanks.

The bikes have been given to the military by e-bike maker Delfast.

Soldiers have then modified them to carry NLAW rockets or other anti-armour weapons.

The UK has supplied thousands of NLAW missiles to the Ukrainian army since the start of the conflict.

Read more: What is an anti-tank weapon and how do they work?

They are delivered in the handheld launcher which can only be used a single time.

They are designed to be operated by a single person and are relatively light - but still cost tens of thousands of pounds each.

The use of the anti-tank missiles has been a key player in Ukraine's ability to slow the Russian advance on several fronts.

NLAWs (or Next Generation Light Antitank Weapons) deliberately target the soft spot between the turret of the tank and the body.

The targeting computer does 95% of the work, meaning all the soldier needs to do is find a safe place with a clear view of the target to fire from.

Read more: Ukraine war: Boris Johnson risks pushing Putin towards 'tactical nuclear strike'

The military uses the bikes to get soldiers to targeting positions quickly. (electrek)
The military uses the bikes to get soldiers to targeting positions quickly. (electrek)

Javelin missiles, which are primarily used by the US, can be used from long range and shoot directly into the air before coming back down and hitting the top of the tank's turret.

The military has utilised the silent nature of the e-bikes and their mobility to help get their soldiers into position.

Militaries across the world have begun trailing e-bikes in their arsenals, usually to assist with getting soldiers quickly into position or to assist with patrols.

The conflict in Ukraine is now mostly concentrated in the east and south of the country as Russian forces gave up on their wider ambitions of conquering the major cities of Kyiv and Kharkiv.