UK anti-racism protesters pull down slave trader statue

A statue of a 17th century slave trader was pulled down in the UK city Bristol on Sunday (June 7) as protests against police brutality and racism continued for a second day.

The statue of Edward Colston was dragged through the streets and thrown in a river as a part of demonstration that have spread across the world, sparked by the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

In London, tens of thousands of protesters like Fiona Collins gathered at the U.S. embassy..

"I'm sick of having to explain to my children that because they're black, they have to act a certain way, they have to behave this way, they have to work ten times harder to get anywhere in life and I've had enough of it. I don't want it for their children, I want it to change and I think this is just the beginning. I'm not going to stop and I'm not the only one, we've got to make a change."

On Saturday (June 6), thousands of protesters gathered in central London for a peaceful demonstration and adding a touch of star power to the crowds, the Queen of Pop - Madonna.

Saturday ended with a small number clashing with mounted police near Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Downing Street residence

and London Police chief Cressida Dick said 27 officers had been injured in "shocking and completely unacceptable" assaults, including 14 on Saturday.

Anger over police treatment of ethnic minorities has sparked protests across the world and on Sunday crowds could be seen taking a knee of defiance in Sydney, Rome and Madrid.

Video Transcript

- A statue of a 17th century slave trader was pulled down in the UK city Bristol on Sunday as protests against police brutality and racism continued for a second day. The statue of Edward Colston was dragged through the streets and thrown in a river as part of demonstrations that have spread across the world, sparked by the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

In London, tens of thousands of protesters, like Fiona Collins, gathered at the US embassy.

FIONA COLLINS: I'm sick of having to explain to my children that because they're black, they have to act a certain way, they have to behave a certain way, they have to work 10 times harder to get anywhere in life. And I've just-- I've had enough of it. I don't want it for their children.

- On Saturday, thousands of protesters gathered in central London for a peaceful demonstration and adding a touch of star power to the crowds, the Queen of Pop herself, Madonna. Saturday ended with a small number clashing with mounted police near Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Downing Street residence.

And London Police Chief Cressida Dick said 27 officers had been injured in quote, "shocking and completely unacceptable" assaults, including 14 on Saturday. Anger over police treatment of ethnic minorities has sparked protests across the world. And on Sunday, crowds could be seen taking a knee of defiance in cities, including Brussels, Rome, and Madrid.