Trump would be a 'force to be reckoned with' in 2024: Sean Spicer

Alexis Christoforous
·Anchor

As President-elect Job Biden assembles his transition team, President Trump refuses to concede the election.

Sean Spicer, Trump’s former White House press secretary, tells Yahoo Finance Live that the president owes it to the nearly 71 million people who voted for him in 2020 not to concede, until he’s certain the election results are accurate.

If he fails to win his court challenges in this election, Trump is reportedly considering a 2024 run. He would be 78 years old, which is how old Biden will be if he is sworn in as the 46th President of the United States on January 20, 2021.

“I’ve never seen a candidate in either party have such control of the base as Trump does, so there’s no question he would be a force to be reckoned with, whether as a Kingmaker or as a candidate himself,” said Spicer.

Trump’s 71,635,654 votes were the second-highest popular vote total in history, behind Biden’s record 76,413,323 votes. Spicer says it reflects the president’s hold — not only on his core supporters — but on the greater Republican Party, and he credits Trump with giving the GOP a more populous flair.

“I think now working men and women, especially people who are small business owners and working one or two jobs at an hourly wage, are becoming Republican,” he said.

Trump “has an obligation to say you voted for me, in many cases you donated, you gave your time or your money. You volunteered. And to show that, he wants to make sure all of their votes were honored,” said Spicer.

A passerby stops to speak with a few supporters of President Donald Trump protesting outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center, where vote counting continues, in Philadelphia, Monday, Nov. 9, 2020, two days after the 2020 election was called for Democrat Joe Biden. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A passerby stops to speak with a few supporters of President Donald Trump protesting outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center, where vote counting continues, in Philadelphia, Monday, Nov. 9, 2020, two days after the 2020 election was called for Democrat Joe Biden. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Trump reportedly plans to hold campaign-style rallies in the coming days, where he’s expected to highlight specific examples of alleged voter fraud, including obituaries of people who supposedly voted in the election despite being deceased.

“This election was close. We need to go through the system, and make sure it was done correctly,” said Spicer. “Maybe we find that there are flaws in the system. Frankly, no matter who you vote for, every vote that’s improperly cast offsets one that is properly cast, and so all of us, as voters and as citizens, should be concerned about any level of voter fraud.”

And if Trump doesn’t prove voter fraud in the election and decides not to run for president in 2024, Spicer expects a very crowded field of potential Republican candidates.

“My guess is you end up seeing 30-plus candidates run for the Republican nomination. You’ve got people who have served under this president, everybody from Nikki Haley to Mike Pompeo to Mike Pence, you’ve got a lot of senators who have talked about openly running and some governors as well, and you’ve got the president’s son Don Jr. even as a potential candidate.”

Alexis Christoforous is an anchor and reporter for Yahoo Finance. Follow her on Twitter @AlexisTVNews.

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