U.S. military

The United States Armed Forces are the military forces of the United States of America. It consists of the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard. The President of the United States is the Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. Armed Forces and forms military policy with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), both federal executive departments, acting as the principal organs by which military policy is carried out.
News on the U.S. Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard, and other aspects of the U.S. military.
  • What Happens if a Navy Aircraft Carrier Is Sunk?
    The National Interest

    What Happens if a Navy Aircraft Carrier Is Sunk?

    Are carriers too big to fail?

  • China's Xi says military must resist 'corrosion' of corruption
    Reuters

    China's Xi says military must resist 'corrosion' of corruption

    China's military must resist the "corrosion" of corruption and ensure the fight against graft is deepened, President Xi Jinping told senior officers, state media said on Sunday, offering a renewed warning against a deep-seated problem. China's military, the world's largest and currently undergoing an ambitious modernization program, has been an important focus of Xi's campaign against corruption since he took power six years ago. Xi has repeatedly warned about the threat of corruption to the country and the party, and has vowed not to let up in the fight against it.

  • U.S. forces to stay in Iraq as long as needed - spokesman
    Reuters

    U.S. forces to stay in Iraq as long as needed - spokesman

    "We'll keep troops there as long as we think they're needed ... The main reason, after ISIS (Islamic State) is defeated militarily, is the stabilization efforts and we still need to be there for that, so that's one of the reasons we'll maintain a presence," Colonel Sean Ryan told a news conference in Abu Dhabi. The number of American soldiers could go down however, depending on when other forces from the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation deploy to help train the Iraqi army, he said, adding that about 5,200 U.S. troops are currently based in Iraq. NATO defence ministers agreed in February to a bigger "train-and-advise" mission in Iraq after a U.S. call for the alliance to help stabilise the country after three years of war against Islamic State.

  • Marine from New Hampshire ID'd as service member who went overboard near Philippines
    Fox News

    Marine from New Hampshire ID'd as service member who went overboard near Philippines

    The Camp Pendleton-based Marine who fell overboard this month from an aircraft vessel off the Philippines, prompting a search, has been identified by military officials. Cpl. Jonathan Currier, a native of New Hampshire, was declared dead Friday after five days of efforts to find him or recovery his body were unsuccessful, San Diego's FOX 5 reported. Currier went overboard from the amphibious USS Essex around 9:40 a.m. Aug. 9 while the aircraft was conducting routine operations off the coast of the Philippines, the report said. Capt. Diann Rosenfield said Currier was with the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit stationed at Camp Pendleton near San Diego, according to a news release.   “Our hearts go

  • Government to investigate fresh claims of plundering of Second World War shipwrecks in Asia
    The Telegraph

    Government to investigate fresh claims of plundering of Second World War shipwrecks in Asia

    An investigation is being launched into claims that up to 10 British Second World War wrecks in Asia have been plundered for scrap metal. Gavin Williamson, the Defence Secretary, said he was "very concerned" to hear fresh allegations that remains of four ships lying off the Malaysian and Indonesian coasts have been looted. It comes after six wrecks, including Royal Navy battleships HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse, were feared to have been damaged or destroyed by scavengers. Altogether the wrecks are thought to be the final resting place for hundreds of Royal Navy sailors and civilians. Remains of the British and Dutch sailors were reportedly dumped by the metal merchants in an Indonesian cemetery.  Mr Williams said the Government "absolutely condemns" the unauthorised disturbance of any wreck containing human remains. "I am very concerned to hear any allegations of incidents of Royal Navy wrecks being plundered in the Far East," he said. "We will work closely with the Indonesian and Malaysian governments to investigate these claims." Family members pay their respects to the 915 Dutch soldiers killed in the battle of the Java Sea at the Dutch war cemetery Ereveld in Surabay Credit: AFP The wrecks of HMS Tien Kwang, HMS Kuala, HMS Banka and SS Loch Ranza had recently been targeted by thieves for their metal, the Mail on Sunday reported. HMS Tien Kwang, a submarine chaser, and HMS Kuala, an auxiliary patrol vessel, were carrying hundreds of evacuees when they were attacked by Japanese bombers near the Indonesian Riau Islands on February 1942. Earlier that month the SS Loch Ranza, a cargo ship, had been set on fire in a Japanese air raid off the Riau Islands and exploded, killing seven men. It came after HMS Banka, a minesweeper, sank after hitting a mine off the coast of Malaysia in December 1941, killing its crew of four British officers and 34 Malay sailors. Chinese-owned barges fitted with cranes have been carrying out the illegal operations, the newspaper reported. Relatives of sailors expressed horror earlier this year at reports that their bodies may have been dumped in an unmarked mass grave in Indonesia. “They have no respect for anyone”, Shirley McGowan, whose grand-father was killed in the sinking of HMS Repulse, told The Telegraph in February. “For them, it is only about the dollars. “These ships are war graves and they should be treated as such”, she added. Looters are said to favour targeting the Second World War-era wrecks because of the ship steel's properties. Built before the advent of atomic weapons, the metal has absorbed little background radiation, making the material suitable for sensitive instruments. Royal Navy battleships HMS Prince of Wales, where Churchill and Roosevelt signed the Atlantic Charter, and HMS Repulse both sank off the Malaysian coast, on December 10 1941. In 2014, the ships, the last resting places of more than 830 Royal Navy sailors, were found to have been damaged by scavengers. Two years ago, the MoD was accused of failing to protect historic wartime wrecks after it was disclosed three British warships, the HMS Exeter, HMS Encounter and HMS Electra, been broken up and removed by illegal scrap metal scavengers.

  • Israel rejects UN report on protecting Palestinians
    AFP

    Israel rejects UN report on protecting Palestinians

    Israel has rejected a report by UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres outlining options for strengthening the protection of Palestinians in Israeli-occupied territories. The 14-page report laid out four options, from increasing aid to the Palestinians, sending UN rights monitors and unarmed observers to deploying a military or police force under UN mandate.

  • A year before D-Day, Allied forces made their first thrust into the 'soft underbelly of Europe' — here's how Operation Husky played out
    Business Insider

    A year before D-Day, Allied forces made their first thrust into the 'soft underbelly of Europe' — here's how Operation Husky played out

    On April 30, 1943, a fisherman off the coast of Huelva, Spain, recovered the body of Maj. William Martin, a dead British soldier. Spanish authorities quickly buried the body, but his personal affects — including the briefcase handcuffed to the dead man's wrist — were turned over to the Germans. For the Germans, it was an intelligence coup. Documents in the briefcase revealed that the Allies, who were on the verge of defeating Axis forces in North Africa, would next invade Sardinia and Greece. Hitler moved entire divisions of troops away from Sicily and southern Italy to prepare for the attacks. But the Germans had been fooled. Maj. Martin was a homeless man from Wales who had killed himself in

  • HMS Queen Elizabeth leaves Portsmouth for historic US trip, amid rumours of potential Trump visit
    The Independent

    HMS Queen Elizabeth leaves Portsmouth for historic US trip, amid rumours of potential Trump visit

    “Having the aircraft carriers maintains our credibility, without the aircraft carriers it would dilute it. Not to have an aircraft carrier at sea, to denude yourself of them, would be a folly,” declared Captain Jerry Kyd. “We remain an island nation with obligations.

  • Why America Should Pull Out of Okinawa
    The National Interest

    Why America Should Pull Out of Okinawa

    America and its allies will be just as safe—or safer—without the Marines on Okinawa. Let’s bring them home.

  • nationalinterest.org

    Why the Navy Doesn't Need New Battleships

    Recent discussions of how to answer current naval challenges in the Pacific would do the old U.S. Navy “Gun Club” proud. The last few years have seen calls to bring the Iowa-class fast battleships out of retirement (again) and refit them for a new age, or for building a new class of battleship entirely to force its way into A2/AD environments being created by the People's Liberation Army Navy in the Pacific. At present, the U.S. Navy is struggling to find real estate for new systems and more firepower on its Block-III Arleigh Burke-class workhorses, even as China prepares to launch a formidable modern class more cruiser than destroyer. Battleships were built to gun carriers intended to give and take punishment in brutal, broadside slugging matches against peer or near-peer competitors.

  • The Nazis Ordered Their U-Boats to Fight Airplanes. It Was a Massive Mistake.
    The National Interest

    The Nazis Ordered Their U-Boats to Fight Airplanes. It Was a Massive Mistake.

    A World War II tale you may have never heard of.