Uber

Follow the latest discussion about ride-sharing company Uber amid its scandal.
  • Uber Settlement: FTC Is Sending Out Money For Company's Lies to Drivers
    Inverse

    Uber Settlement: FTC Is Sending Out Money For Company's Lies to Drivers

    The payments come after an endless torrent of scandal for the company.

  • Uber faces US probe over gender discrimination 
    The Telegraph

    Uber faces US probe over gender discrimination 

    Uber faces US probe over gender discrimination 

  • Uber faces US probe over gender discrimination 
    The Telegraph

    Uber faces US probe over gender discrimination 

    A US federal body has launched a gender discrimination investigation into Uber, it has emerged. The US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is understood to have started the probe in August 2017, seeking information related to hiring practices, pay disparity and gender discrimination. Investigators have interviewed current and former Uber employees and are seeking documents from the business, according to The Wall Street Journal. An Uber spokesman said: “We are continually improving as a company and have proactively made a lot of changes in the last 18 months, including implementing a new salary and equity structure based on the market, overhauling our performance review process, publishing Diversity & Inclusion reports, and rolling out diversity and leadership training to thousands of employees globally.” Uber has been fighting to improve its reputation following months of upheaval at the company that lead to the departure of its founder Travis Kalanick. Uber controversies timeline Uber chief executive Dara Khosrowshahi, who replaced Travis Kalanick last August, has been vocal about improving culture at the ride-sharing business. “We celebrate differences at Uber and are committed to building a culture where everyone feels welcome, supported and challenged,” he said. “To help Uber reach its highest potential, diversity and inclusion needs to be at the core of everything we do.” Figures from Uber state that 38pc of its global employees are women, compared to 62pc of men. In the past 12 months the company has invested in partnerships with groups such as Girls Who Code, BUILD and SMASH, which target the development and promotion of under-represented people in tech. Race and ethnicity figures show that 48.6pc of Uber employees in the US are white, 32.3pc are Asian and 8.1pc are black or African American and 6.1pc are Hispanic or Latino. Last week Uber’s head of human resources resigned after an internal investigation into how she handled employee complaints about racial discrimination. Anonymous whistleblowers had accused Uber executive Liane Hornsey of dismissing allegations of racial discrimination inside the company. In February 2017, Uber launched an internal investigation after allegations of sexual harassment by former employee Susan Fowler surfaced. Ms Fowler alleged that she was subjected to sexual advances by fellow employees. Uber later fired 20 employees following a probe  into 215 reports of workplace misconduct and sexual harassment. The company also conducted a wider internal inquiry into its workplace culture, led by former US attorney general Eric Holder. Uber eventually paid $10m (£7.5m) to settle a proposed class-action lawsuit relating to discrimination against women and minorities inside the company. The EEOC was approached for comment.

  • Papa John's founder-driven public-relations nightmare reminds branding experts of Uber's 2017 fiasco
    Business Insider

    Papa John's founder-driven public-relations nightmare reminds branding experts of Uber's 2017 fiasco

    Papa John's may be the latest brand weathering a public-relations crisis, but branding experts view the situation simply as yet another case of déjà vu. Specifically, it reminds them of Uber. They see parallels between what happened at Papa John's leading to John Schnatter's resignation as chairman this week and how the Uber crisis unfolded in 2017, ultimately leading to the ouster of its founder and CEO, Travis Kalanick. Schnatter, the founder and former CEO of Papa John's, resigned as chairman of the company on Wednesday after admitting to using the N-word in a company conference call. The incident occurred on a conference call with the advertising agency Laundry Service in May, Forbes reported.

  • Papa John's CEO-driven public relations nightmare reminds branding experts of Uber's 2017 fiasco
    Business Insider

    Papa John's CEO-driven public relations nightmare reminds branding experts of Uber's 2017 fiasco

    Branding experts see parallels between what happened at Papa John's leading to its chairman John Schnatter resigning this week and how the Uber crisis unfolded in 2017. Both exits, for one, occurred after the leaders were involved in a series of missteps, one after the other. Schnatter and Uber founder and former CEO Travis Kalanick also were both highly visible founders inextricably linked to their companies and their brands. Papa John's may be the latest brand weathering a public relations crisis, but the situation is just yet another case of déjà vu for branding experts. It reminds them of Uber. Specifically, they see parallels between what happened at Papa John's leading to its chairman John

  • Investopedia

    The Story of Uber

    On May 23, 2018, the company announced a new tender offer that would bump the company's value to $62 billion. Earlier in 2018, Japanese conglomerate Softbank Group, along with a group of investors including Dragoneer Investment Group, successfully bid for 20% of Uber's stock at this lower valuation, a 30% discount of the last valuation figure. The deal reportedly gave Softbank 15% in the ride share company while Uber got a powerful ally in Asia, and could help turn the tide for the company after a few very public missteps.

  • From broke to billionaires: The rise of Airbnb founders
    Daily Mail

    From broke to billionaires: The rise of Airbnb founders

    Today, Airbnb is worth $30billion and has become a lifestyle for modern travelers.  But 10 years ago, when the company was founded in San Francisco, it was little more than a pipe dream and a means of making rent for its founders.  The company, as it is now known, is the brainchild of roommates Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia who were struggling to pay for their shared apartment in August 2007 when they came up with the idea.  To raise money, they blew up air beds and rented them out in their apartment, drawing in three guests -  a 30-year-old Indian man, a 35-year-old woman from Boston and a 45-year-old from Utah - who each paid $80-a-night.  Officially, those were the first dollars the company,

  • Reuters

    BRIEF-Lingbao Gold Group Company Says Wang Junqiang Tendered Resignation As CEO

    June 26 (Reuters) - Lingbao Gold Group Company Ltd : * WANG JUNQIANG TENDERED RESIGNATION AS CEO * APPOINTS CHEN JIANZHENG AS A CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF COMPANY WITH EFFECT FROM 26 JUNE * XING JIANGZE ...

  • Is Facebook (FB) Better Off Without Mark Zuckerberg?
    Zacks

    Is Facebook (FB) Better Off Without Mark Zuckerberg?

    Considering the troubles that have recently plagued Facebook, would it be a good idea for Zuckerberg to step down? Let's take a walk down memory lane before we consider the question.

  • Investopedia

    The Story of Uber

    On May 23, 2018, the company announced a new tender offer that would bump the company's value to $62 billion. Earlier in 2018, Japanese conglomerate Softbank Group, along with a group of investors including Dragoneer Investment Group, successfully bid for 20% of Uber's stock at this lower valuation, a 30% discount of the last valuation figure. The deal reportedly gave Softbank 15% in the ride share company while Uber got a powerful ally in Asia, and could help turn the tide for the company after a few very public missteps.

  • Bloomberg

    Uber Says London Regulator Won't Fight Appeal on License Ban

    Uber Technologies Inc found an unexpected ally at the start of its court battle to continue operating in London: the regulator that banned the global ride-sharing firm in the first place. Transport for London’s position has "moved to one of effective neutrality," Uber lawyer Thomas de la Mare said at the start of the highly anticipated hearing Monday in London. In September, TfL said Uber wasn’t "fit and proper" to operate in London and refused to extend its permit.

  • A year later, what Uber has done to revamp its troubled image
    CNBC

    A year later, what Uber has done to revamp its troubled image

    In June 2017 Uber's board of directors unanimously approved a set of recommendations presented by former U.S. Attorney Eric Holder to dramatically revamp the ridesharing giant's troubled management and culture. Last February the company was hit with widespread allegations of sexual harassment and discrimination; a lawsuit by Google's Waymo self-driving car program accusing Uber of stealing trade secrets; a video showing Kalanick berating an Uber driver, an investigation by the Justice Dept. for using a program to evade law enforcement so it could operate in cities where it was banned. And so much more. In March 2017 Uber retained Eric Holder and Tammy Albarran, partners at the law firm Covington