Silicon Valley

Partially inspired by co-creator Mike Judge's experiences as a Silicon Valley engineer in the 1980s, this comedy series follows the misadventures of introverted computer programmer Richard and his brainy friends as they attempt to strike it rich in a high-tech gold rush. They live together in a Bay Area startup incubator loosely run by self-satisfied dot-com millionaire Erlich, who lets them stay in his house rent-free in exchange for a stake in the projects they invent there. But when Richard develops a powerful search algorithm at his day job, he finds himself caught in the middle of a bidding war between his boss -- whose firm offers Richard an eight-figure buyout -- and a deep-pocketed venture capitalist.
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  • PR Newswire

    SocialSurvey Raises $14.5 Million in Series A

    "The reputation space is crowded and highly disjointed," said SocialSurvey's CEO, Scott Harris. "Multi-location brands often invest in multiple products to support their online reviews, employee engagement, employee feedback and compliance monitoring, but still don't drive meaningful improvement in customer experience. The software developer is backed by venture capital veterans Curtis Feeny and Jim McClean of Silicon Valley Data Capital (SVDC) and Eric Filipek of Kennet Partners LLC. With this funding round, Curtis and Eric will be joining the SocialSurvey Board of Directors.

  • MGM taps Silicon Valley star to helm digital transformation
    VegasInc.com

    MGM taps Silicon Valley star to helm digital transformation

    Looking to better leverage data to grow its business, MGM Resorts International has turned to a Silicon Valley notable. Atif Rafiq, who led a recent digital transformation for McDonald's Corp., will begin as MGM's new president of commercial and growth in May. Rafiq comes to MGM from Volvo Cars, where he has worked as the company's chief digital and information officer since early 2017. From 2013 until early 2017, he served as chief digital officer for McDonald's. He has also worked for Amazon, Yahoo! and AOL during nearly 20 years in the industry. “Looking at the guest experience, MGM has a lot of assets,” Rafiq said. “It has accommodations, restaurants and, of course, gaming. For me, it's going

  • Silicon Valley Came to Kansas Schools. That Started a Rebellion.
    Medium

    Silicon Valley Came to Kansas Schools. That Started a Rebellion.

    The seed of rebellion was planted in classrooms. It grew in kitchens and living rooms, in conversations between students and their parents. It culminated when Collin Winter, 14, an eighth grader in McPherson, Kansas, joined a classroom walkout in January. In the nearby town of Wellington, high schoolers staged a sit-in. Their parents organized in living rooms, at churches and in the back of machine repair shops. They showed up en masse to school board meetings. In neighborhoods with no political yard signs, homemade signs with dark red slash marks suddenly popped up. Silicon Valley had come to small-town Kansas schools — and it was not going well. “I want to just take my Chromebook back and tell

  • Duane Morris Picks Up a Pair Silicon Valley IP Partners From Lewis Roca
    ALM Media

    Duane Morris Picks Up a Pair Silicon Valley IP Partners From Lewis Roca

    After leading Lewis Roca Rothgerberg Christie's Menlo Park office for two years, IP partners Terry Ahearn and Start Bartow have left the firm to join Duane Morris.

  • Ben Silbermann: creating Silicon Valley's “silent unicorn”
    MoneyWeek

    Ben Silbermann: creating Silicon Valley's “silent unicorn”

    Ben Silbermann, who launched the digital pinboard Pinterest in 2010, is not your typical tech entrepreneur. Quiet and meticulous, he has built the company in his own image. Jane Lewis reports. When Ben Silbermann founded Pinterest in 2010, the film The Social Network had just come out. “I was like 'Geez that doesn't look like our company',” he told Forbes last year. “Everyone's drinking all night.” At Pinterest, by contrast, there was no laddish tech culture. “A lot of our early folks had families.” That distinction has endured. The persona of the “aggressive and outgoing” start-up has never really fitted Pinterest, which was scheduled to list this week and is likely to be seen as “a barometer”

  • The Wave of Unicorn IPOs Reveals Silicon Valley's Groupthink
    Medium

    The Wave of Unicorn IPOs Reveals Silicon Valley's Groupthink

    If you want to go unicorn spotting, take a turn around the brand-new park on top of San Francisco's Transbay bus terminal. It is just that, as a would-be icon of San Francisco's business district, the park is conveniently placed for looking out on their corporate headquarters. There are 88 privately held startups worth more than $1bn each in the San Francisco Bay Area, more than in any other region in the world, and a fair few of them, including Slack, a corporate messaging service, and Instacart, a delivery firm, are hard by the Transbay terminal. You can't quite see the headquarters of Lyft and Uber, two ride-hailing services, from its leafy roof, but were you to climb the swanky Millennium Tower next door you could.

  • Why Silicon Valley misses Coach Campbell
    Yahoo Finance

    Why Silicon Valley misses Coach Campbell

    In a new book about legendary Silicon Valley adviser Bill Campbell, former Google CEO Eric Schmidt describes his subject as a salt-of-the-earth, tough-love savant.

  • Capitalism in crisis: U.S. billionaires worry about the survival of the system that made them rich
    Chicago Tribune

    Capitalism in crisis: U.S. billionaires worry about the survival of the system that made them rich

    A perfect California day. The sun was shining, a gentle breeze was blowing and, at a Silicon Valley coffee shop, Rep. Ro Khanna was sitting across from one of his many billionaire constituents discussing an uncomfortable subject: the growing unpopularity of billionaires and their giant tech companies. "There's some more humility out here," Khanna, D-Calif., said. The billionaire on the other side of the table let out a nervous laugh. Chris Larsen was on his third start-up and well on his way to being one of the wealthiest people in the valley, if not the world. "Realizing people hate your guts has some value," he joked. For decades, Democrats and Republicans have hailed America's business elite,

  • Silicon Valley Has Its Tech Campuses. Now It Wants A Monument
    NPR.org

    Silicon Valley Has Its Tech Campuses. Now It Wants A Monument

    As much as Silicon Valley is an actual place, it has no official borders or capital. It's a nickname, not a name on a map. But now there might be a monument about its glory. The San Jose City Council approved a design competition for a landmark that would symbolize the tech industry's power and influence. There isn't a single architectural icon to represent Silicon Valley, like the Hollywood sign or the Empire State Building. However, Silicon Valley has long been physically defined first by its modest, unremarkable suburban office parks. Then, in the past few years, tech giants began erecting grandiose campuses designed by superstar architects. These buildings, such as Apple's new headquarters