Silicon Valley

Partially inspired by co-creator Mike Judge's experiences as a Silicon Valley engineer in the 1980s, this comedy series follows the misadventures of introverted computer programmer Richard and his brainy friends as they attempt to strike it rich in a high-tech gold rush. They live together in a Bay Area startup incubator loosely run by self-satisfied dot-com millionaire Erlich, who lets them stay in his house rent-free in exchange for a stake in the projects they invent there. But when Richard develops a powerful search algorithm at his day job, he finds himself caught in the middle of a bidding war between his boss -- whose firm offers Richard an eight-figure buyout -- and a deep-pocketed venture capitalist.
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  • How Mark Zuckerberg's Folly Was Revealed
    Fortune

    How Mark Zuckerberg's Folly Was Revealed

    How Mark Zuckerberg's Folly Was Revealed

  • Venture firms are making more hires — here's what that means for entrepreneurs
    San Francisco Chronicle

    Venture firms are making more hires — here's what that means for entrepreneurs

    With the increase of capital in Silicon Valley, venture firms are bringing on more partners. Some entrepreneurs say that the process of raising capital from bigger firms has grown increasingly bureaucratic.  There's an increase in the number of venture firms making new hires, and it's having a ripple effect on how entrepreneurs raise capital. A new report from compensation data firm J.Thelander Consulting shows that 80% of venture capital and private equity firms brought on new members in 2018, a 14% uptick from last year. Much of this has to do with the amount of money flooding Silicon Valley's funds, as a vanguard of established firms rake in several billions to be deployed over the course

  • The New Office Perk in Smoky Silicon Valley: Gas Masks
    Bloomberg

    The New Office Perk in Smoky Silicon Valley: Gas Masks

    The wildfire in nearby Butte County is the deadliest in California history. "Wind is pushing the smoke straight into the Bay Area where it is collecting, and not moving," said Tina Landis from the Bay Area Air Quality Management District. San Francisco ranked as the second-worst city in the world for air quality on Friday, according to data provider AirVisual.

  • WRAL.com

    Southwest to launch nonstop flight between RDU, Silicon Valley

    Morrisville, N.C. — You will soon be able to fly direct from the Triangle to Silicon Valley. Southwest Airlines will soon offer a once-per week nonstop flight from Raleigh-Durham International Airport to San Jose, California. According to a tweet from RDU, Southwest will also offer additional daily service to Austin. The flights begin next summer and tickets are on sale now. RDU currently offers 63 nonstop destinations on one of over 400 daily flights.

  • Has Silicon Valley Lost Its Soul? The Case for and Against
    Wired News

    Has Silicon Valley Lost Its Soul? The Case for and Against

    For many avid listeners of public radio, Intelligence Squared U.S. has been a mainstay program for more than ten years. The premise of the show, which debuted in 2006, is reasoned yet passionate debate, with two sides arguing for or against a motion. Recent resolutions include "Globalization Has Undermined America's Working Class" and "The More We Evolve, The Less We Need God." With so much consternation now focused on technology, the show, in partnership with Techonomy, took on Silicon Valley, proposing "Silicon Valley Has Lost Its Soul." Arguing for the motion were Noam Cohen, WIRED contributor and author of The Know-It-Alls: The Rise of Silicon Valley as a Political Powerhouse and Social Wrecking

  • Where Are The Silicon Valley Firms When It Comes to Digital Inclusion in San Jose?
    Forbes

    Where Are The Silicon Valley Firms When It Comes to Digital Inclusion in San Jose?

    San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo decries that many families in his city make only a combined $35,000 and can't afford internet access. These individuals comprise the “invisible” workforce of Silicon Valley, serving the tech elite as janitors, maids, landscapers, dishwashers, and dog walkers. In spite of a booming economy, San Jose is one of America's most expensive rental markets and suffers from significant poverty and homelessness. The average rent is  $3,400. The city is surrounded by some of the richest technology companies in the world—including more than 70 billionaires and Googlers making an upwards of $700,000 annually. Yet, San Jose remains in financial distress as a result of many poor decisions

  • Facebook and California fire: Toxic smoke bleak backdrop for Silicon Valley
    Business Standard

    Facebook and California fire: Toxic smoke bleak backdrop for Silicon Valley

    When I flew into San Francisco last Sunday, the haze shrouding the city was not the usual charming fog, and there was an acrid smell, like a barbecue on steroids. California was on fire. In the past week, towns have been burned out of existence, people have fled the raging flames, and ashes have been falling from a tangerine sky. The conflagration is airborne via the smoke, creating a “weather of catastrophe,” which is the phrase Joan Didion once used to describe the hot Santa Anas blowing into Los Angeles. “The wind shows us how close to the edge we are,” she wrote. As 2018 comes to a close, that edge — a sense that the end times are near — has never been more obvious to those in California's

  • After Khashoggi charges, Silicon Valley shies away from debate on Saudi ties
    SFChronicle.com

    After Khashoggi charges, Silicon Valley shies away from debate on Saudi ties

    Billions of dollars continue to flow into the tech sector from Saudi Arabia. What Silicon Valley remains short on are answers to questions about the ethics of taking money from the kingdom, which has been linked to the killing of a prominent regime critic in the country's consulate in Istanbul last month. Even as Saudi officials offered a new account Thursday of writer Jamal Khashoggi's death last month, with government operatives officially charged with killing him, leaders of companies that have taken Saudi money have remained mum. Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said Tuesday at a Wall Street Journal conference that he would wait to get the facts before deciding the company's reaction. Contacted

  • UCLA Newsroom

    Technology and the public trust: At UCLA, New York Times journalists examine Silicon Valley's impact

    Adam Amengual for The New York Times New York Times journalists Katie Benner, Nellie Bowles, Sheera Frenkel, Farhad Manjoo, Jennifer Steinhauer and UCLA Law Dean Jennifer Mnookin. The ubiquity of social media and its weaponization during the 2016 presidential election have caused wrenching changes in the perception of the platforms, according to four New York Times journalists who participated in a forum at UCLA on Nov. 13. More than 200 people attended “Big Tech in Our Lives: Elections, Markets, Culture, Cities” at the UCLA Meyer and Renee Luskin Conference Center. The event featured technology writers Katie Benner, Nellie Bowles, Sheera Frenkel and Farhad Manjoo. They said that companies including

  • ABC7 San Francisco

    Silicon Valley microcomputer pioneer dies in Camp Fire

    MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (KGO) -- As the search continues for more victims of the Camp Fire, we're learning new details about one of the men who died. Microcomputer pioneer Bill Godbout was among those who perished but many say his legacy will live on for years to come. "Bill was a straight shooter," said Chris Garcia of the Computer History Museum in Mountain View. "He told you what he thought and he made sure to follow through with what he was promising." Godbout, 79, died last week in his Concow home. Back in the mid-to-late 70's, he was instrumental in streamlining the S-100 bus, a communication system that transferred data between components inside computers, including the Altair. He also created

  • The new VA.gov shows what’s possible for government tech after the Healthcare.gov disaster
    Quartz

    The new VA.gov shows what’s possible for government tech after the Healthcare.gov disaster

    Healthcare.gov was a disaster. The site delivering former US president Barack Obama’s signature healthcare plan failed catastrophically (paywall) when it launched in 2013. To fix it, a team of developers and designers, pulled largely from Silicon Valley, landed in Washington DC. Their rescue efforts gave rise to a team of techies who later formed the…

  • Has Silicon Valley Lost Its Soul? The Case for and Against
    Wired News

    Has Silicon Valley Lost Its Soul? The Case for and Against

    For many avid listeners of public radio, Intelligence Squared U.S. has been a mainstay program for more than ten years. The premise of the show, which debuted in 2006, is reasoned yet passionate debate, with two sides arguing for or against a motion. Recent resolutions include "Globalization Has Undermined America's Working Class" and "The More We Evolve, The Less We Need God." With so much consternation now focused on technology, the show, in partnership with Techonomy, took on Silicon Valley, proposing "Silicon Valley Has Lost Its Soul." Arguing for the motion were Noam Cohen, WIRED contributor and author of The Know-It-Alls: The Rise of Silicon Valley as a Political Powerhouse and Social Wrecking

  • Do Algorithms Really Control Society?
    Forbes

    Do Algorithms Really Control Society?

    The idea of technological determinism is treated almost as gospel in Silicon Valley. To many in the Valley, eliminating hate speech is as simple as writing a filter, forcing free speech on the world is as simply as giving them an account, converting the world to a Western democracy as simple as handing the citizenry a megaphone. In reality, of course, the Valley's digital experiment has caused incredible damage to these ideals and served as a powerful reminder that while technology has a tremendous impact on society, so too does that society reshape technology to its own, often unexpected, ends. This firehose of data is combined with our offline actions to build an all-encompassing holistic digital profile of what makes us tick.

  • Tech C.E.O.s Are in Love With Their Principal Doomsayer
    Medium

    Tech C.E.O.s Are in Love With Their Principal Doomsayer

    The futurist philosopher Yuval Noah Harari thinks Silicon Valley is an engine of dystopian ruin. So why do the digital elite adore him so? By Nellie Bowles Futurist philosopher Yuval Noah Harari worries about a lot. He worries that Silicon Valley is undermining democracy and ushering in a dystopian hellscape in which voting is obsolete. He worries that by creating powerful influence machines to control billions of minds, the big tech companies are destroying the idea of a sovereign individual with free will. He worries that because the technological revolution's work requires so few laborers, Silicon Valley is creating a tiny ruling class and a teeming, furious “useless class.” But lately, Harari

  • PR Newswire

    Conservation Awards Given for Planning, Innovation and Partnership

    SAN DIEGO, Nov. 15, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Conservation outreach to Cantonese farmers in Silicon Valley, a new partnership that enhances forests on Fort Bidwell Indian Community lands, and better ways to conduct bird surveys in the San Bernardino Mountains were all celebrated innovations receiving conservation planning awards for 2018. The awards were presented at the annual conference of the California Association of Resource Conservation Districts (CARCD), held this year in San Diego.