Parenting

Parenting was a magazine for families and it was published in United States between 1987 and 2013. Its final headquarters was in Winter Park, Florida.
  • Why you should pay your parents £100 board a month
    the Guardian

    Why you should pay your parents £100 board a month

    Researchers calculated that young adults save £8,000 a year by living at home – and worked out how much they should pay for board each month Young adults should be paying at least £100 a month to their parents for living at home, according to a major academic study into the costs of the “boomerang” generation. The main additional cost is food, say the researchers from Loughborough University and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. They found that on average parents spend an additional £15.86 a week on “cupboard food” and cooked meals for their returning offspring, while the extra gas and electricity added up to £4.78 a week. Even if a young adult pays £100 a month for their board, they are still

  • US parents who starved, shackled children sentenced to life
    The Jamaica Observer

    US parents who starved, shackled children sentenced to life

    CALIFORNIA, United States (AP) — A California couple who for years starved a dozen of their children and kept some shackled to beds were sentenced Friday to life in prison, ending a shocking case that revealed a house of horrors hidden behind a veneer of suburban normality. The conditions inside David and Louise Turpin's home in suburban Los Angeles came to light only after one of their daughters fled and pleaded for help to a 911 operator. The parents pleaded guilty in February to neglect and abuse. The sentencing was preceded by the first public statements from some of the children, who alternately spoke of love for their parents and of what they had suffered, as the couple wiped away tears.

  • Into their 30s, men get way more money from their parents than women
    Quartz

    Into their 30s, men get way more money from their parents than women

    Less than half of women in their early 30s get financial support from their parents, compared with more than 60% of men.

  • Lancashire Telegraph

    Free baby boo play sessions every month

    A BABY play session is now free after winning funding from Tesco's Bags of Help scheme. The Baby Boo project run by the Horse + Bamboo Theatre in Waterfoot, Rossendale, offers the Baby Explorers session to help babies learn sensory play. Using Tesco's Bags of Help scheme, where shoppers collect blue tokens at the end of their shopping trip and choose where to put them, the theatre can now offer the play sessions, free of charge.

  • Single mothers in a bind over details of fathers in key papers
    Daily Nation

    Single mothers in a bind over details of fathers in key papers

    As Kenyans continue to throng registration centres to get their Huduma Namba, single mothers are a worried lot. This is because of the stringent legal requirements that insist on a father's details when registering a child for any number of crucial documents. From witness accounts, it is now emerging that when a father walks out of a relationship and leaves his partner and the children that they had behind, not only is he denying his offspring the chance to grow up with two parents, but he is also making it difficult for the mother to access critical services and documents for their children. In Kenya, the ease of getting identification documents such as birth certificates, identity cards and passports relies heavily on the presence and participation of a father in his children's lives.

  • Ticking time bomb as child hawkers invade streets of major towns
    Daily Nation

    Ticking time bomb as child hawkers invade streets of major towns

    As evening approaches, tens of children pour into the streets of major urban centres in the country. They are in business. They carry packets of sweets or small containers with roasted groundnuts or chewing gum. During school days, the business starts in the evening but during the weekends and school holidays, it begins in the morning. INSULTED The children's target market is the large number of people walking to matatu stations after a day's work or those making their way into town. Mr Peter Mukundi, a Nairobi resident says the children spot a potential customer from a distance. “They are very insistent. They will walk with you until you buy whatever they are offering. Most of the time, I give

  • Professor Holds Single Mother's Baby So She Can Take Exam
    WSLS

    Professor Holds Single Mother's Baby So She Can Take Exam

    Being a single mother attending school full time is no easy feat, but one kindhearted professor is making it a little bit easier. Dr. Julie George, a professor at the University of Texas at Tyler, was photographed holding the sick baby of a nursing student while the woman was taking an exam. “She just rocked my fussy baby right to sleep and held her the entire test. She did it happily and with a smile on her face,” student Katie Lewis told InsideEdition.com. “Being a single mom is hard and being in nursing school is even harder. It lifted a weight off of my shoulders.” Lewis, a 22-year-old single mom, explained that she's in level four of nursing school and will graduate with a Bachelor of Science

  • There’s a Gender Gap in the Legal Marijuana Movement
    The Daily Beast

    There’s a Gender Gap in the Legal Marijuana Movement

    GettySurveys show that on issue after issue, women are more liberal than men, save for one: Men are more likely than women to support the legalization of marijuana.Americans are becoming more supportive of marijuana legalization each year but the gender gap remains a constant: While 68 percent of men now support marijuana legalization, only 56 percent of women do.What’s behind this gender gap?We suspected mothers might be a key driver. In our book “The Politics of Parenthood,” we were able to show that mothers support policies that help children, whether it’s subsidized health care or public assistance for needy kids. So we naturally assumed that mothers – out of concern for children’s health – were driving the gender divide on the issue.We were wrong. Parenthood is politicalBecoming a parent and raising a child is a profound life-altering experience. It changes how you spend your time, the way you think about your finances, whom you socialize with, and what you worry about.But until recently, political scientists had ignored the ways being a parent might shape political attitudes.In previous research, we drew from a range of national data sets to show that parenthood is, indeed, political. We showed that parents have distinct views on a range of policies, from government spending on education and child care, to the role the government should play in helping others.Dads today are more likely to take on child care duties than in the past. But we found that parenthood remains a highly gendered experience. Mothers still spend more time parenting than men. Mothers also engage in more of the day-to-day work of parenting such as scheduling play dates and making doctor appointments.Given the greater amount of time women spend caring for and worrying about their children, it’s perhaps not surprising that women’s political views are more affected than men’s by the experience of being a parent.Across time and across demographic groups, motherhood consistently pushes women to embrace more liberal views on the role of government, which they see as a source of support for their kids. Testing the Motherhood HypothesisAll of this previous research fortified our belief that motherhood would be a major driver behind the gender gap on marijuana legalization. After all, so many of the anti-drug messages in the media focus on the dangers drugs hold for children.It makes sense that mothers – worried about the safety of their children – might not want a mind altering drug to become freely available. Some earlier research even hinted that this might be the case.To put our motherhood hypothesis to the test, we drew on a distinctive data set from the Pew Research Center that included a series of questions on attitudes towards marijuana, including self-reported marijuana usage.Unexpectedly, we discovered that mothers and fathers were no more likely to oppose marijuana legalization than women and men without kids. The Real Drivers of the DivideSo if a lack of support among women for legalization has nothing to do with motherhood, what’s behind their tepid support?We identified three key drivers.First, women are more likely to be religious than men. Earlier work has found that, unsurprisingly, religious people are more disapproving of marijuana use and less likely to try drugs.Second, men have a higher tolerance for risk than women. Legalizing marijuana involves some risks to society, and it appears that men are more comfortable with these risks than women.But what best explains the gender gap in support is the gender gap in marijuana use. Men simply use marijuana more than women, and this seems to make them more likely to support legalization.We were curious about which other demographic and political factors might predict marijuana use and support for legalization. Some results were surprising, while others weren’t.Married people and older people were less likely to report using marijuana – no surprise there. But we found that despite Republicans’ lower level of support for marijuana legalization, Republicans were just as likely as Democrats to report using marijuana.The other surprise was that mothers and fathers who had children 18 or younger in the home were just as likely to report using marijuana as non-parents.The fact that mothers use marijuana as much as other women certainly helps explain why there’s no motherhood gap for marijuana attitudes. When it comes to marijuana, the perception that mothers are distinctively moral – or make more wholesome choices than the rest of society in order to protect their children – isn’t really supported by the data.Read more at The Daily Beast.

  • Father arrested after 18-month-old daughter falls into pool and drowns
    Channel 8 San Diego

    Father arrested after 18-month-old daughter falls into pool and drowns

    SAN DIEGO — The father of an 18-month-old has been arrested after his daughter fell into a swimming pool and drowned Thursday night in the Del Cerro area. The 18-month-old was taken to Alvarado Hospital and later transferred to Rady Children's Hospital where she was placed on life support. The toddler died Friday morning as a result of her injuries. The child's father was identified as Elijah Glassman for child endangerment. Child abuse detectives are investigating the drowning death of the toddler. Anyone with information on the incident is asked to call the SDPD's Child Abuse Unit at (619) 531-2260 or the Crime Stoppers anonymous tip line at (888) 580-8477.

  • 'The Funeral Home Lost Jarvis' Body': Grieving Parents Settle After Babies Placed in Wrong Coffins
    ALM Media

    'The Funeral Home Lost Jarvis' Body': Grieving Parents Settle After Babies Placed in Wrong Coffins

    McWhite’s Funeral Home settled after mixing up the bodies of two stillborn infants. Richard Pravato was among the attorneys representing the children's families.

  • You Deserve to Be Celebrated
    The Mighty

    You Deserve to Be Celebrated

    CheerMeOn and celebrate accomplishments, milestones and wins -- no matter how big or small -- with others who understand their importance. All are welcome here, we only ask that you spread kindness, love and encouragement. Let’s root for each other.

  • Adele Splits From Husband Simon Konecki
    Entertainment Tonight

    Adele Splits From Husband Simon Konecki

    The singer welcomed son Angelo with Konecki in 2012.

  • Could Meghan Markle's Baby Be Born on the Queen's Birthday?  
    People

    Could Meghan Markle's Baby Be Born on the Queen's Birthday?  

    Could Meghan Markle's Baby Be Born on the Queen's Birthday? 

  • New wheelchair-using character on 'Peppa Pig' helping kids at Riley Hospital feel included
    FOX 59 Indianapolis

    New wheelchair-using character on 'Peppa Pig' helping kids at Riley Hospital feel included

    INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – The popular children's show “Peppa Pig” is gaining an even bigger audience with the addition of a new character – Mandy Mouse. Mandy gets around in a wheelchair and therapists at Riley Hospital for Children say it's making more kids feel included. Those at Riley say the TV show didn't draw any special attention to the character's arrival and that's something parents of children with disabilities applaud. Isabelle Jones is a patient at Riley. The 8-year-old has cerebral palsy which confined her to a wheelchair when she was 18 months old. “She seems to like that and the idea of it being in a wheelchair that she can relate with it a little more too,” said Donald Jones, Isabelle's

  • WSAW Wausau

    Part 12: Best practices for protecting your child

    (WSAW) -- Sexual assault can be devastating at any age, but especially as a child while their brain is still developing. 7 Investigates has provided the basic context around the number of sexual assaults in north central Wisconsin, but in Part 13 of this A Cycle of Abuse series the experts have advice for parents and caregivers, and things you can look out for to protect and support your child. The unspoken center of child sexual assault is silence. It's how perpetrators are able to hurt children and how that abuse can continue to unknowingly affect victims and their families for generations. "Generally sex offenders rely on our silence and they rely on secrets," Jessica Lind, the program coordinator