Las Vegas shooting

The 2017 Las Vegas shooting occurred on the night of Sunday, October 1, 2017 when a gunman opened fire on a crowd of concertgoers at the Route 91 Harvest music festival on the Las Vegas Strip in Nevada, leaving 58 people dead and 851 injured. Between 10:05 and 10:15p.m. PDT, 64-year-old Stephen Paddock of Mesquite, Nevada, fired more than 1,100 rounds from his suite on the 32nd floor of the nearby Mandalay Bay hotel.
Keep up with incoming news and updates of the deadliest mass shooting in the U.S.
  • NOFX Say They’ve Been “Effectively Banned” From Playing in the U.S.
    Pitchfork

    NOFX Say They’ve Been “Effectively Banned” From Playing in the U.S.

    “Because of the comments we made in Las Vegas... every NOFX show has been canceled in the U.S.”

  • KOIN

    Police video from Las Vegas shooting shows chaos, confusion

    LAS VEGAS (AP) - Police body camera videos released Wednesday show the chaos and confusion Las Vegas police officers and first responders faced at a mass shooting on the Las Vegas Strip as waves of wounded and fleeing concert-goers sought help. Video from an officer who was near the site of the country music festival shows pickup trucks coming by with the wounded and others piled in the bed in the back. The officer directs the trucks to trauma centers and then takes more injured people to the hospital in the back of his own police cruiser. Another video shows an officer entering the venue as people flee and encountering those with gunshot wounds, including a woman who was shot in the stomach,

  • Police video from Las Vegas shooting shows chaos, confusion
    Fox News

    Police video from Las Vegas shooting shows chaos, confusion

    LAS VEGAS –  Police body camera videos released Wednesday show the chaos and confusion Las Vegas police officers and first responders faced at a mass shooting on the Las Vegas Strip as waves of wounded and fleeing concert-goers sought help. One 30-minute video shows an officer inside the venue as hundreds of people are fleeing and volleys of gunfire can be heard overhead. A dozen people are piled against each other seeking shelter behind a tall sign. The officer joins them, hiding behind the sign until there's a break in the shooting and he and another officer yell for the group to start running. "I have a girl that's shot in the neck," someone said as the gunfire starts up again. The Las Vegas

  • Surviving members of Humboldt Broncos to reunite at NHL awards
    Yahoo Canada Sports

    Surviving members of Humboldt Broncos to reunite at NHL awards

    Several surviving members of the Humboldt Broncos will be reunited for the first time at the NHL Awards on Wednesday night.

  • ABC News

    Humboldt players invited to NHL Awards on Wednesday

    More than two months after the tragedy that killed their teammates, the 10 surviving members of the Humboldt Broncos will be reunited for the first time. The members of the junior hockey team will be honored at the NHL Awards in Las Vegas on Wednesday. The NHL also plans to recognize survivors and first responders from October's Las Vegas shooting -- which occurred nine days before the Vegas Golden Knights' home opener -- as well as the hockey team from Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

  • Top Stories - Breaking News
    ctvnews.ca

    Top Stories - Breaking News

    Some of the first Las Vegas police officers to respond to the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history huddled with people taking cover, organized escape routes, carried wounded victims to safety and ducked behind barriers as bullets rained around them, according to video released Wednesday.

  • Body Cameras Show Officers During Las Vegas Shooting
    CBS Local

    Body Cameras Show Officers During Las Vegas Shooting

    Body Cameras Show Officers During Las Vegas Shooting Las Vegas police released body cam video showing the scene outside the Mandalay Bay Hotel amid a gunman's shooting attack on crowds below in October. CBS2's Maurice DuBois reports.

  • New body-cam footage shows chaos of Vegas shooting attack
    UPI

    New body-cam footage shows chaos of Vegas shooting attack

    June 14 (UPI) -- At least four police officers were instructed to switch off their body cameras on the night of the mass shooting attack in October, new video records show. The Las Vegas Metro Police Department released more than two dozen additional videos Wednesday, including footage from 28 body cameras. Hundreds of 911 calls were also released. Gunman Stephen Paddock fired more than 1,000 rounds from a hotel at the south end of the Strip on Oct. 1 onto a crowd below. Fifty-eight people died and hundreds were injured in the assault. The video footage does not include time stamps and range in length, from less than 30 seconds to two hours. Four videos show officers assembling near Paddock's

  • Videos show Vegas police helping people duck, escape gunfire
    WRAL.com

    Videos show Vegas police helping people duck, escape gunfire

    LAS VEGAS — Some of the first Las Vegas police officers to respond to the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history huddled with people taking cover, organized escape routes, carried wounded victims to safety and ducked behind barriers as bullets rained around them, according to video released Wednesday. "It's coming from the Mandalay Bay!" an officer is heard saying on one video. "Stay down!" he tells unseen people during bursts of rapid gunfire, while a dispatcher on his police radio says multiple people have gunshot wounds. "Over here! Get behind the police car!" The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department released 28 clips of police body-camera video ranging from a few seconds to more

  • Police release more video from officers at Vegas shooting
    waow.com

    Police release more video from officers at Vegas shooting

    Police on Wednesday released video from cameras worn by officers who were trying to find and stop a gunman opening fire from a Las Vegas Strip hotel and help victims wounded during the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. It marks the sixth batch of information released after media organizations, including The Associated Press, sued for video, audio and documents from the Oct. 1 shooting that killed 58 people and injured hundreds of others. Las Vegas police and the FBI have declined to comment on any of the material. The footage and documents have not shed light on a motive for the shooting, and Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo, the elected head of the Police Department, has said the investigation has not identified one.

  • Police release more video from officers at Vegas shooting
    The Seattle Times

    Police release more video from officers at Vegas shooting

    Police on Wednesday released video from cameras worn by officers who were trying to find and stop a gunman opening fire from a Las Vegas Strip hotel and help victims wounded during the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. It marks the sixth batch of information released after media organizations, including The Associated Press, sued for video, audio and documents from the Oct. 1 shooting that killed 58 people and injured hundreds of others. Las Vegas police and the FBI have declined to comment on any of the material. The footage and documents have not shed light on a motive for the shooting, and Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo, the elected head of the Police Department, has said the investigation has not identified one.

  • Indiana teacher survives school shooting, Las Vegas massacre
    Fox News

    Indiana teacher survives school shooting, Las Vegas massacre

    After a central Indiana teacher found herself in the line of fire during last year's Las Vegas mass shooting that killed 58 people, she rode away in her taxi unscathed by a bullet but mentally shaken. Eight months later and this time at her place of employment, Shelly Alexander, a special education assistant at Noblesville West Middle School, found herself again in an active shooter situation when a 13-year-old student opened fire at a central Indiana middle school May 25, wounding a student and a teacher, The Herald reported. Her seemingly irrational fears of loud sounds being gunshots had come true. When Alexander heard a commotion outside her classroom, she immediately started downplaying