Health

Health care or healthcare is the maintenance or improvement of health via the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, illness, injury, and other physical and mental impairments in human beings. Health care is delivered by health professionals (providers or practitioners) in allied health fields. Physicians and physician associates are a part of these health professionals.
News and trends happening right now in public health.
  • Measles kill more people in DR Congo than Ebola: NGO
    AFP

    Measles kill more people in DR Congo than Ebola: NGO

    The disease, preventable with a vaccine, has infected over 145,000 people in the Democratic Republic of Congo between January and early August, it said in a statement. "Only $2.5 million has been raised out of the $8.9 million required for the Health Cluster response plan -- in stark contrast with the Ebola epidemic in the east of the country, which attracts multiple organisations and hundreds of millions of dollars in funding," it added.

  • Fresh basil from Mexico linked to multi-state illness outbreak, FDA warns
    Charlotte Observer

    Fresh basil from Mexico linked to multi-state illness outbreak, FDA warns

    An outbreak of intestinal illnesses across the United States is linked to fresh basil imported from Mexico, according to federal officials.

  • How the world's first heart transplant almost didn't happen due to medical 'rivalries and immense hostility'
    The Telegraph

    How the world's first heart transplant almost didn't happen due to medical 'rivalries and immense hostility'

    On Aug 18 1979 at Papworth hospital near Cambridge, Terence English took a call from a friendly registrar at nearby Addenbrooke's and learnt two equally crucial facts. The first was that a healthy donor heart had become available. The second was that the registrar’s boss, Professor Roy Calne, was out of town. A few hours later, English sewed the organ into the chest of a gravely ill 52-year-old builder from London called Keith Castle. Despite being a poor candidate due to his heavy smoking, Castle survived, regaining full consciousness and going on to live for another five years. Britain’s heart transplant programme was born. Forty years on, Sir Terence, as he now is, reveals the rivalries and immense hostility from the medical establishment that nearly strangled the programme at birth. “God, it was so crucially important that we succeeded,” he told The Sunday Telegraph. “There were a lot of cardiologists who didn’t want to see it happen, and the Department of Health was furious. “But Keith was a great survivor. “I actually think he did more in the months that followed to publicise the value of heart transplantation than I ever could.” Sir Terrance English, who performed the first successful UK heart transplant 40 years ago, reveals how the pioneering surgery almost didn't happen  The first attempt at a heart transplantation in Britain had actually taken place 11 years earlier, but the patient had lived for only 45 days. Similarly poor outcomes in a number of patients over the following year persuaded health chiefs to ban the practice. But by 1979 the powerful immunosuppressant drug ciclosporin had been discovered, which helped prevent the immune system rejecting donor organs. During that time Sir Terence had been training with top US transplant surgeons, meanwhile building up a team of specialists at Papworth, waiting for the mood to change. He was refused funding by the Department of Health, and told he must under no circumstances perform a heart transplant, but the NHS manager for Cambridgeshire believed in the programme and gave the money for two procedures. However, this did not impress (now) Sir Roy Calne, a kidney transplant pioneer to whom Sir Terence had previously promised they would initiate a heart transplant programme together at Calne’s Addenbrooke’s hospital base. Sir Terence says the resulting disagreement was so profound that Sir Roy instructed units under his control - where most of the donors arrived - not to send donor hearts to Papworth. “A lot of the units that were sending [donor] kidneys were told he wasn’t going to accept any if they were also sending hearts. “It was difficult - I could have handled things better, I think.” Sir Roy had not accounted for his senior registrar, Paul McMaster, who believed Sir Terence should have the chance to operate and offered the heart in his superior’s absence. Subsequently the president of Medecins Sans Frontieres UK, McMaster had done exactly the same thing seven months earlier. However, the recipient on that occasion, Charles McHugh, had suffered brain damage while waiting for the organ and died three days after the operation. “I had to go to the Department of Health and explain what had happened,” said Sir Terence. “But they did not know that I had one more shot, and that I was going to use it.” Sir Terence English performed the first successful UK heart transplant 40 years ago Even after the success of Keith Castle’s transplant, officials in Whitehall were initially reluctant to fund further transplants. Sir Terence’s unit had to get by with grants from the British Heart Foundation and the reclusive millionaire Sir David Robinson, founder of Robinson College at Cambridge University. During these early years the survival periods gradually improved thanks to better understanding of how to use ciclosporin.  Currently around 200 heart or heart-lung transplants are carried out on adults every year in the UK, around half of which take place at Papworth. Tomorrow the hospital hosts an event which will be attended by relatives of Keith Castle, and former patients of Sir Terence, including one woman who has lived 37 years since her transplant. “It’s been a long journey, but it’s been worth it, and eventually a lot of good came out of it,” said Sir Terence. “You just had to exert a bit of tenacity of purpose.” Transplant timetable Sir Roy Calne, who could not be approached for comment, went on to perform the world’s first liver, heart and lung transplant in 1987, and the UK’s first intestinal transplant in 1992. Following Sir Terence’s unsuccessful first attempt at a heart transplant in January 1979, Sir Roy wrote to him expressing concern “at the effect that requesting for heart donation may have on our kidney donation”. Professor John Wallwork, who worked with both men and is currently chair of the Royal Papworth Hospital, said: “There was a certain amount of friction” Reflecting on scepticism in the wider medical profession, he added: “Terence did exactly what you should do. “He did his homework, took advice from other people, then did it methodically, which is why he succeeded.” Professor Jeremy Pearson, Associate Professor at the British Heart Foundation said: “One of the British Heart Foundation’s first grants was given to scientists conducting early research into transplant techniques. “From that day in 1963 to the present day, the BHF have been funding pioneers just like Sir Terence to carry out cutting-edge research to improve surgical techniques, prevent transplant rejection and develop medical devices to help the failing heart.”

  • Pump Up Your Arms in Less Than 20 Minutes With This Kettlebell Flow
    Men's Health

    Pump Up Your Arms in Less Than 20 Minutes With This Kettlebell Flow

    This arm pump routine can train your whole body using just a kettlebell.

  • What 'I'm Tired' Really Means When You Live With Depression
    The Mighty

    What 'I'm Tired' Really Means When You Live With Depression

    What "I'm tired" really means when you live with depression.

  • How My Pastor's Words Changed the Way I View My Conditions
    The Mighty

    How My Pastor's Words Changed the Way I View My Conditions

    A woman opens up to her pastor about her chronic conditions, and gets an unexpected response.

  • The Most Heartbreaking Part of 'Chasing the Cure,' a New Show for the Undiagnosed
    The Mighty

    The Most Heartbreaking Part of 'Chasing the Cure,' a New Show for the Undiagnosed

    A Mighty staff member reviews the new TBS show, "Chasing the Cure," which attempts to provide answers and paths forward to those in the undiagnosed community.

  • A teen's abdominal pains turned out to be a fetal twin
    Yahoo Lifestyle

    A teen's abdominal pains turned out to be a fetal twin

    A 17-year-old in India had an abdominal mass removed that turned out to be the remains of a fetal twin.

  • Please Tell Me: Why Do I Keep Dreaming About My Ex?
    The Mighty

    Please Tell Me: Why Do I Keep Dreaming About My Ex?

    If you keep dreaming about your ex-partner, here's why that happens and what to do about it.

  • EU's Juncker cuts holiday short for urgent surgery: statement
    Reuters

    EU's Juncker cuts holiday short for urgent surgery: statement

    The outgoing head of the European Union's executive, Jean-Claude Juncker of the European Commission, has cut short a holiday to undergo urgent surgery, his press team said in a statement on Saturday. "Jean-Claude Juncker had to shorten his holiday in Austria for medical reasons. Juncker, a former Luxembourg premier whose health has been the subject of rife speculation among EU politicians, analysts and media for years, is due to step down on Oct. 31 as head of the Commission.

  • That 14% Four Loko Seltzer Has More Calories Than You Think
    Men's Health

    That 14% Four Loko Seltzer Has More Calories Than You Think

    Beware the dangers lurking behind the hard stuff, says a dietitian.

  • The Science of Personal Space: Why We Need It and 5 Ways to Deal When People Ignore It
    Prevention

    The Science of Personal Space: Why We Need It and 5 Ways to Deal When People Ignore It

    We all know that person who just stands WAY too close.

  • This activated charcoal toothpaste is wildly popular right now — here's what a dentist thinks
    Yahoo Lifestyle

    This activated charcoal toothpaste is wildly popular right now — here's what a dentist thinks

    Does Amazon's best-selling activated charcoal toothpaste really work? 4,000 reviewers think so. Now, a dentist weighs in.

  • News Flash: You're Taking Your Probiotics Wrong
    Best Products

    News Flash: You're Taking Your Probiotics Wrong

    And $5 kombucha is not the answer.

  • Scouted: Not All Shoes Do All Things. Get Intentional With Shoes Designed for Strength Training and Weight Lifting.
    The Daily Beast

    Scouted: Not All Shoes Do All Things. Get Intentional With Shoes Designed for Strength Training and Weight Lifting.

    So far at Scouted, I’ve recommended fitness shoes that are great for covering your entire workout. Broadly speaking, I focused on shoes that afforded lots of support for your trips to the gym and that at the same time were light enough to keep you running briskly through streets, trails, and treadmills. But if you hit the gym or nearest boutique fitness studio and do less running and more stationary workouts, you might benefit from a flatter shoe. The idea is to keep you as balanced as possible. Also, using running shoes or ones whose soles are substantial for weight lifting will increase the weight on the heels of those shoes and they’ll deteriorate faster. Whether you’re taking a break from traditional running or want to start separating your fitness shoes, I put together some great options you should consider getting.Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Low Top Sneakers, $50 on AmazonConverse Chuck Taylor All Star Low Top Sneakers, $50 on Amazon: The iconic Chucks have a surprising past for some as they’re one of the first widely used fitness shoes ever. Flat, stylish, and affordable, they check off lots of marks for someone looking for a side pair of shoes to use at the gym. For more styles and options at the same $50 price, check out the classic shoes at Converse.Mizuno TC-01, $140 at ZapposMizuno TC-01, $140 at Zappos: After Mizuno launched its latest shoe and first in the specific weight-lifting category, it sent me a pair to check out. And I’ve been using them regularly between two or three times a week. Basically, when I know my cardio is going to comprise of the elliptical, treadmill, bike, or otherwise, I have no need for running shoes and turn to the TC-01s. Initially, I saw great value in giving my other shoes more life by sparing them sessions of weight lifting. Now, I’m hooked on these shoes. The ultralight shoes are built with a midsole that responds to pressure points from the outsole and allows you to feel like you’re in contact with the ground. I found this invaluable when situating my feet into proper form before a more rigorous (and therefore higher risk) lift.Adidas Power Perfect 3 Shoes, $65 on AmazonAdidas Power Perfect 3 Shoes, $65 on Amazon: Highly-rated both on Amazon and the adidas site, these shoes were specifically designed for lifters and cross-trainers. The hook-and-loop instep strap design allows you to fully customize how much support your heel and rearfoot will be getting while you break PRs. Reebok’s Crossfit Nano 4, $115 on AmazonReebok’s Crossfit Nano 4, $115 on Amazon: Of the strength training shoe options, I’d say Reebok’s giving us the most stylish one. That’s notable because it allows you to wear the shoe as a casual sneaker if you want to (a strength the Chuck Taylors have down pat). From elevated shock absorption to an ultra-lightweight design and a shoe body designed to keep your foot situated even when you’re not, this is an investment in a high-performance shoe that will stay the course with you for years to come. You can find more colors and sizes from Reebok. MORE FROM SCOUTED: * The 5 Best Dresses From the Need Supply Sale * You Deserve the Best All-Around Boxer Briefs * You Should Invest in Built’s Reusable Food Jars on AmazonScouted is internet shopping with a pulse. Follow us on Twitter and sign up for our newsletter for even more recommendations and exclusive content. Don’t forget to  check out our coupon site to find activewear deals from Nike, adidas, and more.  Please note that if you buy something featured in one of our posts, The Daily Beast may collect a share of sales.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.