Financial aid

The chief financial officer of Florida is an elected statewide constitutional officer of Florida. The office was created in 2002 following the 1998 reforms of the Florida Cabinet. The CFO is a combination of the former offices of comptroller and treasurer/insurance commissioner/fire marshal.
Latest trending news and discussion about financial aid.
  • 3 Stocks That Could Help You Send Your Kids to College
    The Motley Fool

    3 Stocks That Could Help You Send Your Kids to College

    Helping your kids with their educations can be an incredibly expensive proposition. Considering tuition, room, and board, the total cost can exceed $30,000 per year, even for an in-state public school. Go out of state or to a private university, and even that price tag can look cheap by comparison. To figure out ways to cover those massive costs, we asked three Motley Fool contributors to each name a company that could help you send your kids to college. They came up with SLM Corp (NASDAQ:SLM), Activision Blizzard (NASDAQ:ATVI), and Starbucks (NASDAQ:SBUX). Read on to find out why and determine if you can see a path for one or more of them to play a role in your kids' educations. This stock can

  • UNILAG graduate beats 15 contestants, gets LNI scholarship in AUB
    Vanguard News

    UNILAG graduate beats 15 contestants, gets LNI scholarship in AUB

    By Dayo Adesulu LAGOS—A graduate of Petroleum and Gas Engineering, University of Lagos (UNILAG), Mr. Ajibola Olubando, has emerged recipient of the Lebanese Nigeria Initiative, LNI, scholarship programme.  Olubando defeated other 15 contesting students to clinch the prestigious scholarship. With this feat, Olubando is now the first Nigerian postgraduate student to enjoy the scholarship. Speaking during the unveiling of the first LNI Scholarship programme held in Lagos, Consul General of Lebanon, Mr. Elias Nicolas said: ''LNI scholarship will further strengthen our existing friendly relations and add to other economic and social development contributions of Lebanese community in Nigeria.” According

  • Tampa Bay Times

    CareerSource Tampa Bay offering information technology scholarships to students

    CareerSource Tampa Bay is offering scholarships to students aged 17 to 29 to help them learn technology skills that local businesses are looking for. The “TechHire” scholarships fully cover tuition at qualified programs, and range from $100 to $3,000. There are also lab and certification fees for the training programs. “Training and paid work experience opportunities to young adults in high-growth industries and occupations critical to the regional economy: healthcare and information technology," CareerSource said in a release. Applicants must have a high school diploma or equivalent degree, be employed or underemployed, be a U.S. citizen or be eligible to work in the U.S. To apply, visit https://careersourcetampabay.com/pages/TB_techhire.

  • Trump Signs Order for Disabled Veteran Loan Forgiveness
    Forbes

    Trump Signs Order for Disabled Veteran Loan Forgiveness

    President Trump signed an executive order today calling for more streamlined discharges of federal student loans for disabled veterans who cannot maintain employment to repay their debts. The President noted in the order, "There is a pressing need to quickly and effectively resolve this problem [of disabled veterans carrying student loan debt].  Therefore, my Administration will take prompt action to ensure that all totally and permanently disabled veterans are able to obtain, with minimal burden, the Federal student loan debt discharges to which they are legally entitled." Some media outlets and administration officials are mischaracterizing the order as a new student loan forgiveness program

  • Arizona colleges move to extend tuition rate for immigrants
    Education Week

    Arizona colleges move to extend tuition rate for immigrants

    PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona universities are moving to expand access to a tuition rate paid by immigrants living in the country illegally who graduated from Arizona high schools after President Donald Trump's administration froze enrollment in a program that shielded them from deportation. The state's three public universities have for several years allowed students from Arizona in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program to pay university tuition that's higher than their in-state classmates but lower than the standard rate for out-of-state and international students. The Board of Regents is scheduled to decide Thursday whether to eliminate the requirement for students to participate in

  • My Turn: Preserve UNIQUE scholarship program
    Concord Monitor

    My Turn: Preserve UNIQUE scholarship program

    As New Hampshire awaits a final resolution to our state's biennial budget between Gov. Chris Sununu and the state Legislature, addressing college affordability should remain a top priority. Recently, the Monitor's Ethan DeWitt wrote about the current back and forth regarding student loans, debt relief and how best to help families afford college (Sunday Monitor front page, Aug. 11). It's a critical discussion. As DeWitt reported, New Hampshire has the highest college student debt in the country, at more than $34,000 per student. One of the proposed solutions to reducing student debt is built off New Hampshire's 529 college investment savings plan. This is known as the New Hampshire UNIQUE plan.

  • Scholarship honoring historical figures in Yamaguchi aims to get grads into world's top universities
    The Japan Times

    Scholarship honoring historical figures in Yamaguchi aims to get grads into world's top universities

    HAGI, YAMAGUCHI PREF. – The city of Hagi, Yamaguchi Prefecture, has initiated a scholarship program to help high school graduates enter the world's top universities in honor of Hirobumi Ito, Japan's first prime minister, and other local historical figures who studied abroad. The program was inspired by the members of the Choshu Five of the Choshu domain, the predecessor to Yamaguchi, who snuck out of Japan and into Britain in the late Edo Period (1603-1868), learned Western culture and contributed to Japan's modernization. Ito and Kaoru Inoue, the nation's first foreign minister, were among the five. The grant program will offer up to ¥5.5 million per person and does not require recipients to

  • Cathay Bank Foundation Announces Scholarship Recipients
    PR Newswire

    Cathay Bank Foundation Announces Scholarship Recipients

    LOS ANGELES , Aug. 20, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- The Cathay Bank Foundation recently awarded 20 scholarships of $1,000 each to high school seniors who will attend college as full time students this fall. This ...

  • 'We want to give you money'
    The Jamaica Observer

    'We want to give you money'

    ACADIA University in Nova Scotia, Canada, has consistently ranked among the top five undergraduate institutions in that country. In fact, the university, located in Wolfville, ranks fourth overall among Canada's top primarily undergraduate schools, according to Maclean's University Rankings 2019, and second on the reputational survey. However, acting director, student recruitment, Liam Dutton, noted that the school's administration is not caught up in rankings, but instead is focused on student development. With only 3,500 students from more than 80 countries, Acadia promises an “incredible future”. The university offers 30 different programmes within three faculties — Arts, Science and Professional

  • PR Newswire

    Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. Celebrating 100 Years With Historic $100k Scholarship

    WASHINGTON, Aug. 20, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, an international women's service organization with a focus on education, will celebrate its centennial year in January 2020 by awarding a historical $100,000 scholarship to a deserving young woman. Zeta's International Centennial President, Valerie Hollingsworth Baker, the inspiration behind The Founders' Centennial Scholarship, and an exceptional student who earned several academic scholarships when she entered college at the age of 14, remarked, "We were founded on the principles of scholarship, service, sisterhood and finer womanhood with an emphasis on education. Through scholarships funded by its chapters, Zeta has given over $3.5 million in the past five years to help students achieve their college dreams. Hollingsworth Baker added, "As an international service organization, we have made it our mission to make earning a college education easier for deserving students across the globe who may not have the funds to reach these important goals.

  • Kids and Money: Not enough parents realize importance of FAFSA
    The Sacramento Bee

    Kids and Money: Not enough parents realize importance of FAFSA

    Kids and Money: Not enough parents realize importance of FAFSA If your plan for paying for college revolves around presidential campaign promises of free tuition, you'd better have a Plan B. For many families, that entails filling out the FAFSA, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The form, which is required for federal student loans, state grants, college programs, work-study and other money, is available online at https://studentaid.ed.gov., through a new app version, and by printing out a form and mailing it in. (Some highly selective schools also require supplemental financial aid forms.) But only 77% of families in a 2019 survey submitted a FAFSA form, according to the "How America

  • RMCAD Grants Jefferson County High School Graduates A Full Year Of Tuition
    PR Newswire

    RMCAD Grants Jefferson County High School Graduates A Full Year Of Tuition

    LAKEWOOD, Colo. , Aug. 20, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- In an effort to further drive creative careers while inspiring the next generation of young artists, the Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design (RMCAD) is ...

  • Commentary: Two factors keep 'new gen' students from attending college. Here's how to address them
    The Sacramento Bee

    Commentary: Two factors keep 'new gen' students from attending college. Here's how to address them

    Commentary: Two factors keep 'new gen' students from attending college. Here's how to address them Abolishing tuition at public universities has become a hot topic on the campaign trail, with many Democratic presidential candidates endorsing the idea. But if access to college is the issue, two other barriers could be addressed far more quickly and cheaply: convincing high-achieving high school seniors to apply for available grant money and persuading those who have been accepted to college to enroll. These two factors have been estimated to keep several hundred thousand high school graduates from going to college every year. Not surprisingly, "new gen" students – those from low-income families,

  • ‘Free College’ a Tough Sell Even in State With Highest Student Debt
    Bloomberg

    ‘Free College’ a Tough Sell Even in State With Highest Student Debt

    (Bloomberg) -- Even in New Hampshire, where the nation’s highest percentage of young people graduate from college owing money, Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders might have a hard time persuading voters of their plan to cancel all such debts and make public university free.To Sanders and Warren, New Hampshire is a must-win, given that they represent neighboring Vermont and Massachusetts in the U.S. Senate. But the student-debt issue is a microcosm of the challenge both candidates face selling their progressive vision in places where more moderate views prevail.A recent YouGov/CBS poll showed that 61% of Democratic voters in New Hampshire want tuition lowered through added government subsidies, but not free. Only 32% of New Hampshire voters favored tuition-free colleges, while 7% said higher education should cost students whatever the market allows.“When you put together free and college in the same sentence, that’s where you might see some disagreement among voters in New Hampshire,” said Dante Scala, a politics professor at the University of New Hampshire. “It’s fool’s gold to chase younger voters if at the same time you’re turning off a greater number of older, more moderate voters.”No. 1 in Graduating With DebtThe average student in New Hampshire, which holds its primary shortly after the first-in-the-nation Iowa caucuses in February, graduates with more than $34,000 in debt, the fourth- highest average in the nation. And 74% of students in the Granite State finish college with debt, the highest percentage in the nation, according to 2017 research by the Institute for College Access and Success.So it seemed only natural that Sanders and Warren would highlight their plans when they both did a swing through the state last week.“Anybody here dealing with student debt?” Sanders asked the crowd during a town hall in Wolfeboro. Almost a third of the people raised their hands.Warren drew on her own personal experiences to highlight the necessity for free education.“For me personally, I was able to get a four-year diploma without debt, because taxpayers had invested in a commuter college that would cost $50. That option is not there any more,” Warren told reporters in Franconia.Youth VoteWarren and Sanders are counting on progressive young New Hampshire voters who are expected to show up at the polls in large numbers. But the overall electorate skews older. Exit polls show young voters in New Hampshire only made up about 20% of the total electorate in 2016, while 60% was 45 and older.“There’s a generational fairness issue,” said Mark Huelsman, associate director of policy and research at think-tank Demos, which has advocated student-loan forgiveness.“The generation that is maturing politically is both dealing with student debt and for the first time dealing with the idea that they might have to pay for their kids to go to college,” Huelsman said, pointing out that the cost of higher education may still be an important issue for older voters who worry about financing the educations of their children or grandchildren.Other leading Democrats running for president offer some form of higher-education reforms, but none go as far as Sanders and Warren.Joe Biden, who a recent Suffolk University poll showed was leading in New Hampshire with 21%, released an education plan focused primarily on supporting teachers, as well as improving and simplifying the government’s existing Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program.Kamala Harris would establish a student-debt forgiveness program. And Pete Buttigieg, who with his husband, Chasten, carry a total of $130,000 in student debt, has said he doesn’t support free college.“I believe in reducing student debt. I also believe in free college for low and middle-income students for whom cost can be a barrier, I just don’t believe it makes sense to ask working-class families to subsidize even the children of billionaires,” Buttigieg said at the first Democratic debate in June.Some students in New Hampshire agree.“Getting rid of all debt for everyone, is not necessarily something I’m 100% a fan of because there is a lot of people out there who take out debt and do have the income to be able to afford it,” said Matt Gerding, a graduate student at the University of New Hampshire, who’s taken out $45,000 in loans for undergraduate and graduate school. “Warren’s plan is focused on those who need the help the most, which I like.”The Pay-ForsSanders’s $2.2 trillion plan would cancel all student debt in America, while making public universities free for everyone, regardless of ability to pay. His proposal would be financed by a 0.5% tax on stock transactions, a 0.1% tax on bond trades and a .005% tax on derivatives transactions.Warren’s $1.2 trillion plan, funded by a 2% tax on the assets of Americans worth more than $50 million, also calls for free public universities. But a Warren administration would cap loan forgiveness at $50,000 and would primarily target people who make less than $100,000 a year.The potentially good news for Sanders and Warren is that young voters have become increasingly active since President Donald Trump was elected.Voters between ages 18 and 29 overwhelmingly backed Sanders in 2016 by 83%. Younger voters in New Hampshire almost doubled their voter share in the 2018 midterm elections, compared to the previous midterms in 2014, according to TargetSmart, a Democratic data and strategy firm.“Younger voters are being driven by a number of issues, including student debt, so we’re seeing the Democratic field reacting to that and promoting progressive policies that will appeal to younger voters,” said Tom Bonier, TargetSmart’s chief executive officer. “Compared to 2016, when I think most voters didn’t take Trump’s candidacy seriously, I believe there will be a significant surge in intensity in 2020.”To contact the reporter on this story: Misyrlena Egkolfopoulou in Washington at megkolfopoul@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, Wendy Benjaminson, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 'We want to give you money'
    The Jamaica Observer

    'We want to give you money'

    ACADIA University in Nova Scotia, Canada, has consistently ranked among the top five undergraduate institutions in that country. In fact, the university, located in Wolfville, ranks fourth overall among Canada's top primarily undergraduate schools, according to Maclean's University Rankings 2019, and second on the reputational survey. However, acting director, student recruitment, Liam Dutton, noted that the school's administration is not caught up in rankings, but instead is focused on student development. With only 3,500 students from more than 80 countries, Acadia promises an “incredible future”. The university offers 30 different programmes within three faculties — Arts, Science and Professional