Fake news

Fake news is a type of yellow journalism or propaganda that consists of deliberate misinformation or hoaxes spread via traditional print and broadcast news media or online social media. This false information is mainly distributed by social media, but is periodically circulated through mainstream media.
News and discussion about fake news, from the 2016 U.S presidential election forward.
  • What our investigative journalists expose isn't fake news
    USA Today

    What our investigative journalists expose isn't fake news

    USA TODAY Network reporters aren't the enemy of the people. They pursue real stories intended to right wrongs and help the least among us. Imagine if your daughter has been wrongfully convicted of murder, and no one cares. Your wife died during childbirth, and the experts now blame her medical condition. Or your dad, a decorated military veteran, is rotting in a nursing home, and the owners pay you lip service — because your dad is really a monthly paycheck to them. These are the stories that our investigative journalists quietly expose. They aren't fake news. The reporters aren't the enemy of the people. They pursue real stories intended to right wrongs and help the least among us.  Journalism

  • More than 1,600 URLs blocked in India over last 18 months to curb fake news
    Business Standard India

    More than 1,600 URLs blocked in India over last 18 months to curb fake news

    As many as 1,662 uniform resource locators (URLs) or posts on social media were blocked over 18 months ending June 2018, Ravi Shankar Prasad, minister for electronics and information technology, told the Rajya Sabha (Parliament's upper house) on August 3, 2018, as part of an explanation on combating fake news. Facebook blocked the most (956 or 58 per cent) of URLs, under section 69A of the Information Technology (IT) Act, 2000, followed by Twitter (25 per cent) and YouTube (9 per cent). The “intermediary” or the website or page that fails to comply with the law can be punished with imprisonment up to seven years and a fine. Of 2,190 million Facebook users across the world, 9 per cent were Indians

  • Huckabee: CNN's Antifa Reaction Is Why It's Called 'Fake News'
    CNS News

    Huckabee: CNN's Antifa Reaction Is Why It's Called 'Fake News'

    (CNSNews.com) -- Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, a Republican, tweeted on Monday that CNN has earned its “Fake News” label because of stunts such as calling Antifa an “anti-hate group.” In his Aug. 13 tweet, Huckabee said, “It's why CNN is known as Fake News as they actually called violent Antifa thugs 'anti-hate groups.' Antifa is just left mirror image of racist idiots. I guess they fight hate by being hateful in the same way they fight fascism by acting like fascists.” To back his claim, Huckabee shared a Twitchy article that showed tweets accusing Antifa protesters of using violence and saying incendiary things. The tweets said things like, “By 'Anti-Hate Groups' CNN is referring

  • Wake up! Foucault's warning on fake news
    www.bbc.com

    Wake up! Foucault's warning on fake news

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  • Columbia museum exhibit tracks history of fake news
    FOX 2 News St. Louis

    Columbia museum exhibit tracks history of fake news

    COLUMBIA, Mo. – A museum exhibit in Columbia is unpacking how the concept of fake news has developed over time. The Columbia Missourian reports that the Boone County History and Culture Center recently opened the exhibit, “The History of Fake News (and the Importance of the World's Oldest School of Journalism).” Visitors can learn about how misinformation spreads until January. Curator Clyde Bentley is also a professor at University of Missouri's School of Journalism. Bentley says fake news started long before President Donald Trump's campaign. He tracks fake news back to England's King Charles II, who banned coffee in the 1600s on the grounds of fake news. The exhibit also highlights the Missouri

  • FAKE NEWS! A look at what didn't happen this week
    The Detroit News

    FAKE NEWS! A look at what didn't happen this week

    None of these stories is legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. ■The Facts: Former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill did not say “the fascists of the future will call themselves anti-fascists,” as suggested by a meme shared online Tuesday by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott. The quote, which appears with a picture of Churchill and the words “CHURCHILL ON THE LEFTWING(sic)” was tweeted by Abbott on his personal account, along with the comment: “Some insights are timeless.” David Freeman, director of publications at the International Churchill Society, called the meme a classic example of “Churchillian drift,” which he described as quotes erroneously attributed to Churchill in the pursuit of adding intellectual heft.

  • Why we're susceptible to fake news, how to defend against it
    medicalxpress.com

    Why we're susceptible to fake news, how to defend against it

    Thought processes and belief systems that people develop early in life to help protect against the anxiety and stress of an uncertain world may help explain why some individuals fall victim to what has come to be known as fake news, but psychologists can offer some strategies to defend against it, according to a series of presentations at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. "At its core is the need for the brain to receive confirming information that harmonizes with an individual's existing views and beliefs," said Mark Whitmore, Ph.D., assistant professor of management and information systems at Kent State University's College of Business Administration. The key to people's accepting fake news as true, despite evidence to the contrary, is a phenomenon known as confirmation bias, or the tendency for people to seek and accept information that confirms their existing beliefs while rejecting or ignoring that which contradicts those beliefs, he said.

  • Fake news: What exactly is it – and how can you spot it?
    The Telegraph

    Fake news: What exactly is it – and how can you spot it?

    Fake news: What exactly is it – and how can you spot it?

  • The Gateway Pundit's Jacob Wohl is now writing for fake news site YourNewsWire
    Media Matters for America

    The Gateway Pundit's Jacob Wohl is now writing for fake news site YourNewsWire

    Jacob Wohl, a notorious pro-Trump Twitter troll who is also a contributor for The Gateway Pundit, is now writing for YourNewsWire, one of the most notorious fake news sites in the United States. Wohl is a staunchly pro-Trump commentator and hedge fund owner known for regularly tweeting at President Donald Trump (who has retweeted some of his tweets), for plagiarism, and for his propagandist claims, such as writing, “[Russian President] Vladimir Putin does a lot for his country considering he's only paid the measly salary of $112,000 a year — He could easily make millions of dollars a year from public speaking alone, but after 20 years in the spotlight, he presses on,” and, “I hope Vladimir Putin gives President Trump a lesson on how to (sic) they deal with Fake News in Russia.” On June 12, Wohl announced that he would be writing for The Gateway Pundit, a notoriously terrible far-right blog that has received White House press credentials from the Trump administration.

  • Survey: U.S. Electorate, Burned by Fake News, Trusts TV News More Than Other Sources
    Forbes

    Survey: U.S. Electorate, Burned by Fake News, Trusts TV News More Than Other Sources

    A new report by the Video Advertising Bureau asserts that news consumers across all ages, ethnicities, income levels, genders, and political affiliation perceive television as an exponentially more trustworthy information platform at all stages of political campaigns. “As some platforms unintentionally allow the dissemination of unverified news stories and political ads, television is trusted because it provides an environment that features 100% professionally produced news,” the VAB concluded in the report, which was released late last week. The report was based on an internet survey conducted in May and June of registered or likely voters aged 18 and over. The survey was fielded by the online

  • Confessions of an enemy of the people
    Yahoo News

    Confessions of an enemy of the people

    If President Trump’s threats against reporters went to the next level -- think Soviet-era show trials -- I imagine it happening something like this.