Climate change

Climate change occurs when changes in Earth's climate system result in new weather patterns that last for at least a few decades, and maybe for millions of years. The climate system is comprised of five interacting parts, the atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (water), cryosphere (ice and permafrost), biosphere (living things), and lithosphere (earth's crust and upper mantle). The climate system receives nearly all of its energy from the sun, with a relatively tiny amount from earth's interior.
Keep up with the latest news and discussion about climate change.
  • Reuters

    INSIGHT-Going Dutch on clean energy? Polluters push for state to split the bill

    In a meeting at the economic affairs ministry in The Hague late last year, Tata Steel's Dutch chief Theo Henrar pledged he would spend hundreds of millions of euros to cut factory emissions - on condition the government invested a similar amount. The proposal from the industrial giant, which has not been made public, comes against the backdrop of global wrangling between governments and corporations over who should foot the bill to ensure countries meet tough climate targets. It is an example of how big companies in the Netherlands and beyond are putting forward their own plans to reduce emissions as they look to ward off the carbon taxes they fear will hammer their businesses, or at least see them softened.

  • On Climate Change- Screening of the film”The Human Element” and Panel Discussion
    RSVPA | WITF's Online Event Calendar

    On Climate Change- Screening of the film”The Human Element” and Panel Discussion

    Film Screening and Discussion of The Human Element Citizens' Climate Lobby of Lancaster and Community Mennonite Church of Lancaster April Earth Action Event Lancaster, PA: Citizens' Climate Lobby, Lancaster (CCL) and Community Mennonite Church of Lancaster will present a screening and panel discussion of environmental photographer James Balog's film The Human Element, as part of CCL's April Earth Action events, April 27th, 7pm at the Community Mennonite Church, 328 West Orange Street, Lancaster. This event is free and open to the public. With rare compassion and heart, this powerful film follows environmental photographer James Balog on his quest to highlight Americans coast-to-coast on the front

  • Business Standard India

    Global warming hits sea creatures hardest: Study

    Ocean-dwelling species are two times more likely to be wiped out due to global warming than life on land, a study has found. The greater vulnerability of sea creatures may significantly impact human communities that rely on fish and shellfish for food and economic activity, according to researchers from Rutgers University in the US. The research, published in the journal Nature, is the first to compare cold-blooded marine and land species' sensitivity to warming and their ability to find refuge from the heat while staying in their normal habitats. "We find that, globally, marine species are being eliminated from their habitats by warming temperatures twice as often as land species," said Malin Pinsky, an associate professor at Rutgers University.

  • Editorial: With no life, there are no voters
    Mail & Guardian

    Editorial: With no life, there are no voters

    Our climate is collapsing. At least 70 people died in KwaZulu-Natal this week, as tonnes of rain smashed into the ground and water tore through poorly built infrastructure. Hundreds died in Mozambique as Cyclone Idai ripped an entire city apart. The maize crop is staggering under the effects of last year's drought, intense heat and now vicious hail. All of this was predicted. This is the inevitable outcome of a global system in which we don't pay the true cost for the things we use. Shopping centres and mines are built in the wetlands that used to slow down floodwaters. Oil refineries dump poisoned air into the lungs of children, denying them the chance to create a better future for all of us.

  • wbal.com

    UN climate chief warns current path leads to 'catastrophe'

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. climate chief says world leaders must recognize there is no option except to speed-up and scale-up action to tackle global warming, warning that continuing on the current path will lead to "a catastrophe." Patricia Espinosa stressed in two recent interviews with the Associated Press that climate scientists say there's still a chance to make things right "but the window of opportunity is closing very soon" and the world has 12 years until carbon emissions reach "a point of no return" — something some top scientists say is an oversimplification of a U.N. report last year. She said that means the world needs to accelerate all efforts to keep from reaching that level,

  • A Pioneer Spring- Couple Slushy Inches Saturday
    Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune

    A Pioneer Spring- Couple Slushy Inches Saturday

    Saturday Slush Potential: Heaviest South of MSP If anyone, anywhere, tells you a weather-horror story, odds are you can one-up them. One of many reasons to call Minnesota home? We have weather-boasting-rights for the free world. And the parts that aren't free, too. Friend and climate historian Mark Seeley reports the May Minnesota daily snowfall record belongs to Dodge Center, where 15.4 inches fell on May 2, 2013. I've observed that stoic, good-natured Minnesotans lose their sense of humor when it snows on their green lawns. Saturday's forecast isn't nearly as shriek-worthy, at least for the immediate Twin Cities metro, where an inch or two of slush may pile up on some lawns. Precipitation will

  • Human-Caused Climate Change Played Limited Role In Beijing's 2013 'Airpocalypse'
    Eurasia Review

    Human-Caused Climate Change Played Limited Role In Beijing's 2013 'Airpocalypse'

    The record high levels of fine particulate matter in the air caused airports to close and thousands of coughing, choking citizens to seek hospital care. Although the particulate matter that filled the winter skies resulted from both human and natural emissions, a new Northwestern University study concludes that human-caused climate change played only a minor role in the air's stagnation. The study, which used computational simulations of climate, is one of the first to tie an air quality episode to human-caused climate change. This type of research is part of the growing subfield of climate science called “detection and attribution of extreme events,” which assesses how human emission of greenhouse gases may have contributed to the occurrence and/or severity of a particularly impactful event.

  • Manitoba files separate court action over federal carbon tax, seeks review
    CTV Winnipeg

    Manitoba files separate court action over federal carbon tax, seeks review

    WINNIPEG -- The Manitoba government has filed its own court challenge of the federal government's carbon tax, following similar moves by Ontario and Saskatchewan. In documents filed in Federal Court on Wednesday, the Manitoba government seeks a judicial review to quash the federal tax on the grounds it exceeds Ottawa's constitutional authority. "The (federal carbon-tax law) falls outside of Parliament's jurisdiction," says the notice of application. Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Ontario and New Brunswick -- all provinces led by conservative governments -- have refused federal Liberal demands to enact their own carbon levies. That prompted Ottawa to impose its own tax in those provinces, which started

  • Greenland ice sheet is now shrinking so fast that it's 'a bit scary'
    msnbc.com

    Greenland ice sheet is now shrinking so fast that it's 'a bit scary'

    Greenland's ice sheet is melting six times faster than it was in the 1980s. And all that meltwater is directly raising sea levels. That's all according to a new study, published April 22 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, that carefully reconstructs the behavior of the ice sheet in the decades before modern measurement tools became available. Scientists already knew that there was a lot more ice on Greenland in the 1970s and 1980s. And they've had precise measurements of the increase in melting since the 1990s. Now they know just how dramatically things have changed in the last 46 years. "When you look at several decades, it is best to sit back in your chair before

  • Fox Business guest pushes climate denial: "I see no evidence whatsoever that capitalism is causing the planet to go through any kind of a environmental crisis"
    Media Matters for America

    Fox Business guest pushes climate denial: "I see no evidence whatsoever that capitalism is causing the planet to go through any kind of a environmental crisis"

    STUART VARNEY (CO-HOST): Justin, am I right that the -- what's fueling criticism of capitalism and the move towards socialism is, A, income inequality and B, climate change? Is that the root cause of it all?  JUSTIN HASKINS (HEARTLAND INSTITUTE): I actually think that the root cause of it all is the indoctrination factories that have become the American education system. I think that our children are woefully uneducated when it comes to the history of socialism, and I believe -- and capitalism, frankly, and I believe that over the past 30, 40, 50 years, really going back to the 1960s, kids have been taught a completely distorted view of what's been going on in history. They have not been told

  • One million species risk extinction due to humans: draft UN report
    AFP

    One million species risk extinction due to humans: draft UN report

    Up to one million species face extinction due to human influence, according to a draft UN report obtained by AFP that painstakingly catalogues how humanity has undermined the natural resources upon which its very survival depends. The accelerating loss of clean air, drinkable water, CO2-absorbing forests, pollinating insects, protein-rich fish and storm-blocking mangroves -- to name but a few of the dwindling services rendered by Nature -- poses no less of a threat than climate change, says the report, set to be unveiled May 6. Indeed, biodiversity loss and global warming are closely linked, according to the 44-page Summary for Policy Makers, which distills a 1,800-page UN assessment of scientific literature on the state of Nature.

  • Readers Write: Police 'warrior' training, climate change, South St. Paul graduation ceremony dispute, Alexandra and Irwin Jacobs
    Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune

    Readers Write: Police 'warrior' training, climate change, South St. Paul graduation ceremony dispute, Alexandra and Irwin Jacobs

    Really? Is this the “new normal” in American governance? (“Union's 'warrior' courses defy ban,” April 25.) OMG, where do I access my emigration papers? Let me recap: The last several years have fostered the outsourcing of police training to a private organization that teaches them to behave toward citizens as if they are in a war zone. What can go wrong? The appalling, unnecessary deaths of many innocent unarmed Americans nationally. A 12-year-old boy playing in a park — police cruiser pulls up, shoots him. Why? They're scared. This is warrior-style training. It has no place on American streets and neighborhoods terrorizing citizens by police officers trained to kill, not de-escalate, but kill

  • Ashland tackles climate change
    The MetroWest Daily News

    Ashland tackles climate change

    Selectmen have voted to put a net-zero resolution on the November Town Meeting warrant that states that by 2040, the town will have completely offset its use of greenhouse emissions. ASHLAND - In Joel Arbeitman's estimation, the only chance humanity has in combating climate change is for everyone to work together. “We are engaged in a war and we have maybe 10 years, maybe 20 years, to make radical changes in every aspect of our lives,” Arbeitmen said. “What we need is for each person, regardless of their discipline, whether they're a journalist, an architect … (or) a teacher. We need absolutely everybody to use their skills to join the battle here and make a difference.” Arbeitman was among more

  • U.S. starts building first polar-class icebreaker in 40 years
    seattlepi.com

    U.S. starts building first polar-class icebreaker in 40 years

    Caption Close The ice in the Arctic is melting and opening new navigation routes, with Russia responding with a fleet of 44 icebreakers and China developing its own fleet although they are nowhere near polar regions. The United States had just one operational polar-class icebreaker. The 42-year old Polar Star was assigned permanently to Antarctic waters. "We have to get in the game," Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, said in Seattle on Thursday. "We are an Arctic nation without Arctic resources," added Murkowski who chairs the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. The senator received word Wednesday from U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Karl Schultz that construction on a new cutter is

  • WSJ and right-wing outlets hype dubious study criticizing electric vehicles
    Media Matters for America

    WSJ and right-wing outlets hype dubious study criticizing electric vehicles

    The Wall Street Journal published an editorial on April 23 that derided electric vehicles in Germany as "dirty," based on a recent study that has been called into question by a number of experts and mainstream German news outlets. The Journal's editorial board, which has a history of climate denial, has attacked both German energy policy and electric vehicles (EVs) before. The dubious study has also been hyped by climate deniers and right-wing outlets in the U.S., including Infowars and The Daily Caller. Experts point out major flaws in German study on electric vs. diesel cars The study was conducted by the Ifo Institute, a Munich-based think tank, and argued that a Tesla Model 3 electric vehicle