Climate change

Climate change is a change in the statistical distribution of weather patterns when that change lasts for an extended period of time (i.e. , decades to millions of years). Climate change may refer to a change in average weather conditions, or in the time variation of weather within the context of longer-term average conditions, defined by the World Meteorological Organization as a 30 years or longer term.
Keep up with the latest news and discussion about climate change.
  • Roundtable: How to prepare for the changes in store for EMS
    EMS1

    Roundtable: How to prepare for the changes in store for EMS

    From making strides in combating the opioid epidemic, to growing adoption of prehospital assessments like point of care ultrasound, to adopting alternative patient transportation models, 2018 has been a year for change, growth and optimism in EMS. We asked EMS leaders from the EMS1 Editorial Advisory Board what 2019 will bring for EMS. Here, they share their predictions, as well as tips for agencies to be prepared for the changes ahead. Now is the time to plan for how climate change will impact your community Climate change will literally be a hot topic for EMS in 2019 and beyond, though I doubt it will receive the attention it deserves from field providers and EMS leaders. Worst ever flooding,

  • MEPs to scrutinise ExxonMobil's alleged role in climate change misinformation
    the Guardian

    MEPs to scrutinise ExxonMobil's alleged role in climate change misinformation

    Campaigners welcome move over claims firm knew of global warming dangers for decades Mon 17 Dec 2018 12.57 EST Last modified on Mon 17 Dec 2018 13.04 EST ExxonMobil's alleged role in spreading misinformation about climate change will be scrutinised by the European Unionfor the first time, in a move welcomed by campaigners. The world's biggest international oil company has been investigated in the US over allegations that it knew about the dangers of global warming for decades but deceived the public over the risks, a charge the firm has rejected. EU politicians would now turn their attention to the role the company has played in Europe, where it has a sizeable presence from the huge Groningen

  • The massive CO2 emitter you may not know about
    BBC News

    The massive CO2 emitter you may not know about

    Concrete is the most widely used man-made material in existence. It is second only to water as the most-consumed resource on the planet. But, while cement - the key ingredient in concrete - has shaped much of our built environment, it also has a massive carbon footprint. Cement is the source of about 8% of the world's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, according to think tank Chatham House. If the cement industry were a country, it would be the third largest emitter in the world - behind China and the US. It contributes more CO2 than aviation fuel (2.5%) and is not far behind the global agriculture business (12%). Cement industry leaders were in Poland for the UN's climate change conference - COP24

  • Sunday, Dec. 16, 2018 letters: Oval Office showdown, fallout – or not – of Mueller probe, climate change solutions
    Denver Post

    Sunday, Dec. 16, 2018 letters: Oval Office showdown, fallout – or not – of Mueller probe, climate change solutions

    Showdown in the Oval Office over border wall Re: “Trump threatens shutdown…” Dec. 12 news story The Trump administration is a continuing series of head fakes, trying to turn the public attention away from the latest failure, and toward something Trump can claim as a monumental victory. The funding shutdown is no different, Trump has already publicly announced no matter what happens, if the Democrats don't knuckle under, and give him what he wants, he'll shut the government down and blame them. The president wants his wall funded,and even though Mexico isn't going to pay for it, (yet another failed campaign lie he knew was false when he said it), he wants it right now. Democrats would be unwise

  • Why icebergs from Greenland are melting in the middle of London
    MNN - Mother Nature Network

    Why icebergs from Greenland are melting in the middle of London

    Several not-so-little pieces of Greenland have come to London ... and they're going fast. The latest work of thought-provoking genius from Icelandic-Danish artist Olafur Eliasson, "Ice Watch" is a pointedly ephemeral public art installation centered around 30 free-floating icebergs — yep, they're the real deal — that have been hauled from the Nuup Kangerlua fjord near Nuuk, Greenland, via refrigerated containers and plopped in the heart of the British capital. Per the project website, removing the massive hunks of ice didn't impact the overall quantity of ice in Greenland, where 10,000 similar blocks are shed every second. Twenty-four of the land-bound icebergs — each initially weighing 1.5 and

  • How I stave off despair as a climate scientist
    Nature

    How I stave off despair as a climate scientist

    There's a curve that is quietly plotting our performance as a species. This curve is not a commodity price or a technology index. It has no agenda or steering committee. It is the Keeling curve. It is painfully consistent in its trajectory and brutally honest in its graphical indictment of our society as one that stands ready to stand by as islands submerge, cities burn and coasts flood. Established by Charles David Keeling in 1958, the curve records how much carbon dioxide is in our atmosphere — fewer than 330 parts per million then, more than 400 today. Each month for the past decade, my geeky addiction has been to scan the latest data. To search for some hint that 'Stabilization Day' will

  • CIBC shrinks event after Whistler tries to bill oil firm for climate change
    CTVNews

    CIBC shrinks event after Whistler tries to bill oil firm for climate change

    WHISTLER, B.C. -- The ski resort town of Whistler, B.C., is learning that getting involved in the fight between environmentalists and oil companies can result in negative consequences. Part of CIBC's annual investment conference to be held in the community next month has been scrapped after the town council took part in a letter-writing campaign demanding oil companies compensate it for its costs related to climate change. After Whistler sent a letter to Calgary-based oilsands giant Canadian Natural Resources Ltd., several energy firms reportedly said they would back out of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce event. CIBC has since decided to cancel the oil and gas part of its conference, although

  • How We Grow and Eat Food Is Going to Kill Us All
    GQ

    How We Grow and Eat Food Is Going to Kill Us All

    A years-long study of global food production shows that the entire system is insane.

  • EcoWatch

    Amazon Employees Praised for Using Shareholder Status to Demand Comprehensive Climate Plan

    A small group of Amazon workers is receiving big praise for their efforts to force their employer to be a better steward of the planet. More than a dozen employees of the online retail behemoth who have received stock as part of their compensation are, as the New York Times reported, "starting to use those shares to turn the tables on their employers" by putting forth shareholder petitions demanding that the trillion-dollar e-commerce company craft a comprehensive plan to address the global climate crisis. In November and December, the employees submitted identical petitions calling for the plan. As the Times outlined Sunday: Their filing appears to be the first time that tech employees have

  • Business Standard India

    BoE's Carney says may test banks for climate change impact

    LONDON (Reuters) - Banks in Britain may be tested for their resilience to the impact of climate change on their balance sheets, Bank of England Governor Mark Carney said on Monday. Carney told the Financial Times he was weighing whether the risks and opportunities from climate change should be the focus of the BoE's "exploratory scenario" test of banks. The exploratory scenario test was introduced in 2017 and takes place every two years, with the next one due in 2019. It has no pass mark, unlike the main, annual health check which all lenders passed this year. The BoE said in October that banks must come up with credible plans for protecting themselves against risks from climate change and may

  • Fox Business

    Political price of Paris Climate Accord now painfully clear: Varney

    Democrats need to take note of what has happened to France's Emmanuel Macron.

  • Top 10 stories of 2018: Climate change, gene-edited babies, hidden craters and more
    Science News

    Top 10 stories of 2018: Climate change, gene-edited babies, hidden craters and more

    In 2018, we saw just how much power science has to make a real impact.  Science News' top stories of the year include a literal impact — the hidden contours of what appears to be a massive crater created when a meteorite slammed into Greenland long ago. That discovery ranks among our Top 10 partly because it's just cool, but also because it raises the tantalizing prospect of solving a scientific mystery: Did the impact kick the planet into a roughly 1,000-year cold snap, called the Younger Dryas, almost 13,000 years ago? The mammoths and other species that died out by the end of that period didn't see climate change coming. But we can. That's why human-driven climate change is our top story of

  • El Niños to strengthen because of global warming, will cause 'more extreme weather', study says
    The Tennessean

    El Niños to strengthen because of global warming, will cause 'more extreme weather', study says

    El Niños will be stronger and more frequent in the decades ahead  because of global warming, causing "more extreme events" in the United States and around the world, a study said Wednesday. A natural phenomenon marked by warmer-than-average seawater in the tropical Pacific Ocean, El Niño is Earth's most influential climate pattern. Rather than once every 15 years, powerful El Niños will occur roughly once every 10 years, said study lead author Wenju Cai, a scientist with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization in Australia. The entire natural climate cycle is officially known as El Niño – Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which swings between warmer and cooler seawater in the tropical Pacific.

  • UNH researchers find high levels of nitrate in Puerto Rico streams after storms, see climate change link
    BostonGlobe.com

    UNH researchers find high levels of nitrate in Puerto Rico streams after storms, see climate change link

    Many people suffered from Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. But scientists, in a new study, say they've uncovered a worrisome impact on the environment, too. University of New Hampshire researchers have measured unusually high levels of nitrate in the island territory's streams. The theory is that stronger and more frequent storms caused by climate change have knocked down vegetation, and the resulting decomposition elevated nitrate levels in the soil. Storms are then washing the nitrate into the streams, researchers said in a statement from the university. The increased levels of the plant nutrient threaten ecosystems along the island's coastline with algal blooms that could harm marine life,