Charlottesville, Va.

Charlottesville, colloquially known as C'ville and officially named the City of Charlottesville, is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. In 2016, an estimated 46,912 people lived within the city limits. It is the county seat of Albemarle County, which surrounds the city, though the two are separate legal entities. This means a resident will list Charlottesville as both their county and city on official paperwork.
Latest news and discussion about events in Charlottesville, Va.
  • One year after racist rally, Charlottesville is in a tug of war over its soul
    WRAL.com Raleigh

    One year after racist rally, Charlottesville is in a tug of war over its soul

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — In the days following the deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville last summer, angry residents took over a City Council meeting, screaming and weeping into the microphone. They blamed leaders for failing to stop hordes with guns, swastikas and Confederate flags from descending on the city. “Why did you think that you could walk in here and do business as usual after what happened?” Nikuyah Walker, one of the activists there that day, bluntly asked the sitting mayor. Today, in a sign of how much has changed since white nationalists rallied here and shocked the nation, Walker is mayor herself, the city's first black woman to serve in that role. Since the rally,

  • Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen gives neo-Nazis a pass
    The Arizona Republic

    Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen gives neo-Nazis a pass

    Opinion: The Homeland Security Secretary had a chance to condemn white supremacists and...didn't A journalist will occasionally lob a softball question to a government official, letting the bigwig the take a big swing and make a bold – if obvious – pronouncement that just about everyone agrees with. Racists. Neo-Nazis. And the secretary … whiffed. How do you miss that? She missed the ball completely. The conversation revolved around the white nationalist protest that took place in Charlottesville, Va., last year, the one in which a crazed supremacist drove a car into a crowd, killing a woman. The one in which President Donald Trump actually said there were “very fine people on both sides.” NBC

  • 5 guilty of traffic violations during rally-related protest
    Daily Mail

    5 guilty of traffic violations during rally-related protest

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) - Five people who were arrested in June while protesting a 20-day jail sentence for a black man using a makeshift flamethrower during a violent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last year have been found guilty of committing traffic violations. A local lawyer representing the five people told news outlets they were found guilty Thursday in Charlottesville General District Court. They each received a $15 fine. Defense attorney Jeff Fogel said Keval Bhatt, Sara Tansey, Nic McCarthy-Rivera, Eleanor Myer-Sessoms and James Swanson entered Alford pleas to the misdemeanor charges of stepping in the road. In an Alford plea, the accused does not admit guilt

  • DHS secretary Kirstjen Nielsen still will not condemn white supremacist violence in Charlottesville
    Salon.com

    DHS secretary Kirstjen Nielsen still will not condemn white supremacist violence in Charlottesville

    As the year anniversary of the white supremacist “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, VA approaches, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen appeared to reiterate Donald Trump's “both sides” rhetoric.  Vice News' Tess Owen tweeted that during the Aspen Security summit, Nielsen was asked about the president's comment that there were “very fine people on both sides” of the rally where counter-protester Heather Heyer was struck and killed by a man who was allegedly “infatuated” with Nazis. “It's not that one side was right and one side was wrong,” Nielsen said. You can watch Nielsen discuss white nationalism below: Top Trending Check out the major news stories of the day

  • Kirstjen Nielsen Doubles Down On Trump's Infamous 'Both Sides' Comment
    HuffPost

    Kirstjen Nielsen Doubles Down On Trump's Infamous 'Both Sides' Comment

    It's been nearly a year since a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville,

  • DHS chief on Charlottesville: 'It's not that one side is right and one side is wrong'
    The Hill

    DHS chief on Charlottesville: 'It's not that one side is right and one side is wrong'

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenHillicon Valley: EU hits Google with record B fine | Trump tries to clarify Russia remarks | Sinclair changing deal to win over FCC | Election security bill gets traction | Robocall firm exposed voter data Court rules against Trump administration on transgender military ban The Hill's Morning Report — Trump's walk-back fails to stem outrage on Putin meeting MORE on Thursday spoke about the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., last year saying "it's not that one side is right and one side is wrong."  Her comments were made when she was pressed to address comments made at the time by President TrumpDonald John TrumpIran

  • Washington Post

    Opinion | Trump's worst moment since Charlottesville

    It was as predictable as the sunrise, and it arrived at just about the same moment on Wednesday — a 5:53 a.m. tweet from President Trump undoing his previous day's forced acknowledgment that he had made a monumental blunder in Helsinki. On Tuesday, summoning the amount of enthusiasm normally associated with hostage videos, the president read a statement claiming he misspoke during his news conference with Russian President Vladi­mir Putin. Trump zeroed in on one narrow comment: his statement that he saw no reason Russia would have interfered with the 2016 election. “I said the word 'would' instead of 'wouldn't,' ” he said, adding that it was “sort of a double negative.” That was enough to give

  • How Trump's Putin Summit Do-Over Mirrors His Charlottesville Response
    HuffPost

    How Trump's Putin Summit Do-Over Mirrors His Charlottesville Response

    President Donald Trump's attempt on Tuesday to backpedal on his disastrous

  • Virginia parks that shed Confederate names renamed again
    The Seattle Times

    Virginia parks that shed Confederate names renamed again

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — A year after two parks in Virginia shed the names of Confederate generals, the parks have again been renamed. News outlets report that the Charlottesville City Council voted 4-1 Monday night to change the name of the former Lee Park from Emancipation Park to Market Street Park, while the former Jackson Park's name has been changed from Justice Park to Court Square Park. The initial name change came in June 2017 and followed recommendations from a commission that studied the city's Confederate imagery. The name changes, along with plans to remove a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee from one of the parks, led to rallies featuring torch-bearing white nationalists and deadly

  • Charlottesville decides Justice, Emancipation are premature
    Channel 8 San Diego

    Charlottesville decides Justice, Emancipation are premature

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) - Charlottesville's leaders have decided their city isn't ready for Emancipation and Justice. Still struggling over how to handle Confederate symbols, the Charlottesville City Council voted 4-1 Monday night to change the names of two parks yet again. The former Lee Park, renamed Emancipation Park, is now Market Street Park. The former Jackson Park, whose name was changed to Justice Park, is now Court Square Park. The initial name changes in June 2017 followed recommendations from a commission that studied the city's Confederate imagery. This and plans to remove the statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee led to rallies featuring torch-bearing white nationalists and deadly violence.

  • Charlottesville decides Justice, Emancipation are premature
    WSFA 12 Montgomery

    Charlottesville decides Justice, Emancipation are premature

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) - Charlottesville's leaders have decided their city isn't ready for Emancipation and Justice. Still struggling over how to handle Confederate symbols, the Charlottesville City Council voted 4-1 Monday night to change the names of two parks yet again. The former Lee Park, renamed Emancipation Park, is now Market Street Park. The former Jackson Park, whose name was changed to Justice Park, is now Court Square Park. The initial name changes in June 2017 followed recommendations from a commission that studied the city's Confederate imagery. This and plans to remove the statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee led to rallies featuring torch-bearing white nationalists and deadly violence.

  • Will violence erupt again in Charlottesville?
    Politico

    Will violence erupt again in Charlottesville?

    SHADOW OF CHARLOTTESVILLE LOOMS: As the one-year anniversary of violent clashes in Charlottesville, Va., approaches, officials in the city that's home to the University of Virginia say they are preparing for the worst-case scenario. They are getting ready, in case it's needed, for more white supremacist-connected violence on Aug. 12. — The preparation comes even though the city has taken steps to minimize fierce conflicts like the one last year, which left one person dead and others injured. The chaos stemmed from a group of white supremacists who had gathered to protest plans to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The steps to avoid a repeat of last year include adopting event