Addiction

Addiction is a brain disorder characterized by compulsive engagement in rewarding stimuli despite adverse consequences. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; refs with no name must have content Despite the involvement of a number of psychosocial factors, a biological process – one which is induced by repeated exposure to an addictive stimulus – is the core pathology that drives the development and maintenance of an addiction.
  • Homes Under The Hammer star loses driving ban appeal after blaming it on asthma
    Daily Mirror

    Homes Under The Hammer star loses driving ban appeal after blaming it on asthma

    Homes Under the Hammer star Martin Roberts has lost an appeal against his driving ban after the presenter failed to take a breath test last November. The BBC presenter, who suffers from asthma, claimed he tried but failed to complete two blows into the breathalyser machine and he was convicted for failing to provide a specimen. But police accused him of sucking rather than blowing and, after only one successful test which showed him to be almost twice over the limit, they charged him with failing to provide a specimen of breath and he was banned from driving for 23 months. Roberts maintains the reading could have been contaminated by his asthma inhaler. Speaking outside Bristol Crown Court yesterday

  • The woman behind a West Virginia addiction response team
    seattlepi.com

    The woman behind a West Virginia addiction response team

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (AP) — Larrecsa Cox had a train ticket and $100 to her name. She was just trying to leave Wisconsin, and never anticipated she'd be combating drug addiction in a city that media referred to as "ground zero" for the opioid crisis. "I never thought I'd live in West Virginia," Cox said. In the winter of 2017, Cox became the first and only full-time member for the Huntington Quick Response Team, a group designed to help those struggling with addiction get treatment. But she ended up in West Virginia by complete happenstance. Cox grew up in Texas and moved to Wisconsin with her mother after her parents divorced. By the time she was 19, she decided to move to the Mountain State because

  • the Guardian

    Safe injection rooms are key to halting rise in drug deaths – expert

    Former drugs tsar says Home Office must end opposition to 'fixing' spaces to tackle issue The Home Office must abandon its opposition to safe injection rooms if it wants to reduce drug-related deaths, now at record levels, a former government drugs chief has said. David Nutt, who was chair of the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs, said that failure to respond to last week's revelation that drug deaths were at their highest since records began in 1993 would constitute “a wilful disregard of evidence”. The statistics showed that deaths from drug poisoning rose by 16% last year, representing the steepest year-on-year rise. However, the Home Office is refusing to sanction safe injection rooms

  • Marin schools anti-vaping grant: Nearly $500K a year through 2022
    Marin Independent Journal

    Marin schools anti-vaping grant: Nearly $500K a year through 2022

    As Marin students return to school, educators and health officials are hoping nearly $500,000 in state grants announced this month will help them curb the rise in youth vaping. The Novato Unified, Tamalpais Union and Ross Valley school districts will share the award, which will be distributed annually for three years. The tobacco-use prevention education grants from the California Department of Education award Novato Unified $130,278; Tam Union, $224,100 and Ross Valley, $114,737. “We're thrilled three school districts were awarded grants, but this issue really affects all schools,” said Dr. Matt Willis, Marin County public health officer, in an email. “The plan is to spread the programs and

  • Letters: Let's declare Chico a heroin-free city
    Chico Enterprise-Record

    Letters: Let's declare Chico a heroin-free city

    Heroin is a horrible drug.  In college, my roommate was addicted to opioids and it was a nightmare to live with him.  I saw first-hand how these types of addictions can ruin a life so quickly and mercilessly. There is currently an effort to help heroin addicts gain access to free clean needles right here in Chico.  While I believe that those behind this effort have good motives and they believe they will be helping people, the fact is that it will not.  Anyone who has studied addiction knows that every addict will try to find an enabler. This is someone who has a heart of compassion, but will unknowingly enable the addict to continue in their addiction.  This enablement is neither kind nor loving.

  • Kirstie Allsopp slams 'drug taking friends' for 'horror of county lines dealing'
    Daily Mirror

    Kirstie Allsopp slams 'drug taking friends' for 'horror of county lines dealing'

    Kirstie Allsopp has taken aim at her 'friends' she has accused of taking drugs on a regular basis and helping the 'horror of county lines dealing.' The 47-year-old TV presenter hit out on Twitter and questioned whether her using friends "feel totally s*** about themselves" by help the growth of drugs outside the capital. She wrote: "When people who take drugs on a regular basis, friends of mine amongst them, see the horror of county lines drugs dealing and the damage done to very young people, do they feel totally s*** about themselves or do they just think roll on legalisation?" Her comments follow a warning from police that dealers were targeting seaside towns this summer, with Bournemouth

  • Why Montana Is Closing A Camp For Kids With Behavioral Issues
    NPR.org

    Why Montana Is Closing A Camp For Kids With Behavioral Issues

    DAVID GREENE, HOST: The parents of some troubled children received an unexpected call this summer. The state of Montana was shutting down a private ranch. This is a ranch that they paid thousands of dollars to help their kids with severe behavioral issues. There were allegations of chronic abuse. Aaron Bolton from Montana Public Radio has more. AARON BOLTON, BYLINE: The Ranch for Kids in remote northwestern Montana says it specializes in helping adopted children from Russia with behavioral and emotional issues. Dasha Springer's parents sent her to this school in the town of Rexford from 2007 to 2009, hoping it would stop her lying and manipulation. She says instead of therapy, residents were

  • Researcher discovers gene mutation that contributes to addiction
    medicalxpress.com

    Researcher discovers gene mutation that contributes to addiction

    In the field of addiction research, one question looms large: Why do some people face a higher risk than others for alcoholism and drug abuse? A researcher at the OU College of Medicine, William R. Lovallo, Ph.D., recently published one of the field's few studies focused on how a person's genes contribute to addiction. Lovallo's research showed that a tiny genetic mutation can put people at higher risk for alcohol or drug addiction. His research was published in the world's leading journal on alcoholism, Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. Many people ask whether addiction is caused by person's genes or their family environment. The short answer is that it's both. However, Lovallo's

  • Reuters

    Tobacco industry anti-smoking ads reached less than half of U.S. adults

    Court-ordered anti-smoking ads sponsored by the tobacco industry reached only around 40% of adults and about half of all smokers in the U.S., a recent study suggests. Past research has shown that anti-smoking mass media campaigns are an effective public health intervention and work to reverse misconceptions, researchers write in JAMA Network Open. In 2006, U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler ruled in favor of the Department of Justice in a lawsuit against the tobacco industry, requiring cigarette companies to sponsor anti-smoking advertisements in major newspapers, television, retail displays, cigarette packages and their corporate websites in order to "correct" misleading messages the industry had been putting out for decades.

  • What cocaine does to your body and brain
    Business Insider

    What cocaine does to your body and brain

    Whether it's snorted, smoked, or injected, cocaine enters the bloodstream and starts affecting the brain in a matter of seconds. Regular, heavy use can have extremely negative consequences, from nosebleeds to permanent lung damage and even death. Here's a look at some of the ways cocaine affects the body and brain. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Whether it's snorted, smoked, or injected, cocaine enters the bloodstream and starts affecting the brain in a matter of seconds. But the high is short-lived, and in most cases lasts anywhere from five to 30 minutes. Regular, heavy use can have extremely negative consequences, from nosebleeds to permanent lung damage and even death.

  • New York pursuing Sacklers' financial records in opioid case
    Houston Chronicle

    New York pursuing Sacklers' financial records in opioid case

    New York officials are demanding that banks and other companies with connections to the family that owns OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma hand over financial records as the state tries to trace where money from opioid sales ended up. The state attorney general's office began issuing subpoenas this week as part of its lawsuit seeking to hold the drug industry accountable for the opioid addiction and overdose crisis. "The opioid epidemic has ravaged American communities for over a decade, while a single family has made billions profiting from death and destruction," Attorney General Letitia James said in a statement. "From the day we filed this complaint, we said the Sackler family would be held responsible for their actions hooking our nation on OxyContin.

  • Cocaine, Marijuana, Shrooms and Oxy Seized In Anne Arundel County Drug Bust
    CBS Baltimore

    Cocaine, Marijuana, Shrooms and Oxy Seized In Anne Arundel County Drug Bust

    ARNOLD, Md. (WJZ) — More than 656 grams of cocaine, marijuana and psilocybin mushrooms were seized in a drug bust in Anne Arundel County Friday morning. County police were tipped off about drug activity at a home in the 600 block of Southern Hills Drive in Arnold in July. They executed a search warrant Friday morning and seized the following items: 21 grams of cocaine (estimated street value $12,221) 88 grams of marijuana (estimated street value $9,177) 58 grams of psilocybin mushrooms (estimated street value $2,785) 12 Oxycontin pills Cutting agents/paraphernalia (powder inositol, powder caffeine, bags, empty gel capsules, scale) S. Currency 2009 Jeep Cherokee drugs 4 Credit: Anne Arundel County

  • Rantz: After rehab, Seattle cop fired for self-reporting marijuana use
    MyNorthwest.com

    Rantz: After rehab, Seattle cop fired for self-reporting marijuana use

    The Seattle Police Department fired a young officer after he self-reported his symptoms of depression and addiction to marijuana. Now, with the backing of the police union, that officer is fighting to get back his job. Young Jun Lim, who served in the West precinct, told his superior that he was suffering from symptoms of depression. This didn't come as a shock to his lieutenant. “Luckily he noticed that, and he had an officer who was involved in peer support come and talk to me,” Lim, 24, exclusively told The Jason Rantz Show on KTTH. “That officer told me his story about his substance use and how the department helped him out during his trying times. So I decided to come forth and tell my lieutenant

  • Is it cool for Nate Diaz to smoke a joint at a UFC workout? A brief explainer
    MMA Junkie

    Is it cool for Nate Diaz to smoke a joint at a UFC workout? A brief explainer

    Nate Diaz made headlines when he lit up a joint at a Wednesday open workout for UFC 241 in Anaheim, Calif. You might be wondering: “Can he do that?” Here's a short explainer from MMA Junkie to separate the smoke from the fire. Diaz's history Diaz (19-11 MMA, 14-9 UFC), who on Saturday faces ex-champ Anthony Pettis (22-8 MMA, 9-7 UFC), claimed the joint he was smoking contained cannabidiol, or CBD, a non-psychoactive cannabinoid in the plant. Diaz said he was promoting a new company, Game Up Nutrition, that sells CBD products online. It's not the first time Diaz has used the cannabinoid in public. He drew from a vape pen following his rematch against Conor McGregor at UFC 202 and was later sanctioned