Abortion debate

Abortion is the ending of pregnancy by removing an embryo or fetus before it can survive outside the uterus. An abortion that occurs spontaneously is also known as a miscarriage. An abortion may be caused purposely and is then called an induced abortion, or less frequently, "induced miscarriage". The word abortion is often used to mean only induced abortions. A similar procedure after the fetus could potentially survive outside the womb is known as a "late termination of pregnancy".
News on pro-life and pro-choice issues, including changes to Planned Parenthood.
  • Vote points to big win for abortion rights groups in Ireland
    Pueblo Chieftain

    Vote points to big win for abortion rights groups in Ireland

    DUBLIN (AP) — Abortion rights activists proclaimed victory for Irish women Saturday as referendum results indicated voters in largely Roman Catholic Ireland overwhelmingly backed repealing a 1983 constitutional ban on abortions. Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, speaking Saturday after exit polls suggested voters chose to liberalize Ireland's strict abortion laws by a margin of more than two to one, called the result the culmination of a "quiet revolution." "The people have spoken," said Varadkar, a medical doctor who campaigned for repeal in Friday's historic referendum. "The people have said that we want a modern constitution for a modern country, that we trust women and we respect them to make

  • Activists welcome Irish returning home to vote
    Pueblo Chieftain

    Activists welcome Irish returning home to vote

    DUBLIN (AP) — The Latest on the abortion referendum in Ireland (all times local): 2 p.m. Supporters of liberalizing Ireland's strict abortion ban have given an ecstatic welcome to the Irish people abroad who have travelled home to vote in the country's historic referendum on abortion. Several activists gathered at Dublin Airport's arrivals hall, holding a large "Welcome Home" banner. Others held a placard reading "Thank you for making the journey so other women don't have to." One female traveller was seen dancing in joy as she arrived, as the activists whooped and cheered. Thousands of Irish people have been returning home to take part in Friday's referendum on whether to repeal the country's

  • Ryanair flight crashes with another plane on the runway at Stansted
    Mail Online

    Ryanair flight crashes with another plane on the runway at Stansted

    A Ryanair flight carrying dozens of Irish voters home for the abortion referendum has crashed with another plane on the runway at London Stansted Airport today. The wing of Primera flight PF2871 to Malaga clipped the tail of Dublin-bound Ryanair aircraft FR205 as they were both on the taxiway this morning. Passengers were told by cabin crew that the aircraft had been hit by another plane, with three fire engines racing to the scene in Essex at about 9.15am.  The airport said both planes were required to return to the stand after the 'minor airfield incident', but no injuries were reported and no evacuation was required. A spokesman for Stansted added: 'As a precaution, airfield operations were

  • Ireland votes on its abortion ban, a 'once in a generation' decision
    Washington Post

    Ireland votes on its abortion ban, a 'once in a generation' decision

    CASTLEREA, Ireland — Aine Kelly knows her home town. “The young leave,” she said. “The old stay.” As the 29-year-old campaigner with a stack of pamphlets walked through a housing development, knocking on doors, the locals revealed themselves: They were retirees who favored garden trolls, statues of the Virgin Mary and wee, excitable dogs. “Hello, sir!” Kelly said to an elderly gentleman who kept a wheelbarrow filled with peat for his fireplace. “We're here to talk to you about the referendum and what you might be thinking.” For the next seven minutes, Kelly and the man in a gray sweater engaged in a remarkable conversation, a civil, skeptical, charged, raw and very personal debate, about what

  • Botched abortions are on the rise -- fueled by Trump's funding cuts
    CNN

    Botched abortions are on the rise -- fueled by Trump's funding cuts

    Reliant on international donors for support, communities like Kibera are where the Mexico City policy has been felt the most and, so far, the national government says it has been unable to make up the shortfall. For five years Khadijah Dija visited a family health clinic in the slum every three months to get a free contraceptive injection until Trump's funding cuts came into effect. The single mother-of-two says she relied on the family-planning method to avoid having another child she couldn't afford. Her daily earnings from selling porridge, equivalent to 50 cents, are barely enough to buy food for her family, or pay rent on their one-room house. When the nongovernmental organization Family

  • I'm Pregnant and I Want My Baby—But I Still Need to Know My Abortion Options
    Marie Claire

    I'm Pregnant and I Want My Baby—But I Still Need to Know My Abortion Options

    In 2014, I was 15 weeks pregnant and sitting on a tissue-covered exam table at my doctor's office, joking with my partner about whose genetics were responsible for the miniature features we'd seen during our last ultrasound. The test—a nuchal translucency ultrasound—had come back abnormal, weighing my pregnancy down with terms like “congenital heart defect” and “chromosome abnormality.” In a matter of minutes, we went from debating whose nose our baby was going to inherit to learning about the risks of various medical tests, being referred to a fetal and neonatal cardiologist, and discussing the possibility of terminating a pregnancy we very much wanted during the second trimester. In a matter of minutes, we went from debating whose nose our baby was going to inherit to discussing the possibility of terminating a pregnancy we very much wanted. On May 22, the Trump administration submitted proposed changes to Title X, which would prevent clinics or organizations that receive federal family planning funds from providing abortions or referring women to organizations that do, The New York Times reports.

  • Ireland abortion referendum latest: Republic DIVIDED as landmark vote looms
    Express.co.uk

    Ireland abortion referendum latest: Republic DIVIDED as landmark vote looms

    Gaye Edwards, who is campaigning to repeal Ireland's constitutional ban on abortion, says it the debates have become extremely “uncomfortable”. She is one of the many women who took the journey out of Ireland to end a pregnancy after she found out her baby could not survive outside the womb because of foetal abnormalities.  Ms Edwards said: “People have been rude, by all means. “One of our canvassers had a man get right in her face and poke her and shout 'baby killer'. As soon as another man came along he backed off.  “We're not an abstract concept. I'm neighbour to lots of people, I'm mum to four kids, all of whom go to school. “I don't think it's a good thing to require people to speak out,

  • Woman who shot Wichita abortion doctor, bombed clinics in 1990s released from prison
    kansascity

    Woman who shot Wichita abortion doctor, bombed clinics in 1990s released from prison

    The Oregon woman who shot and wounded a Wichita abortion doctor 25 years ago and firebombed several clinics in three states has been released from federal prison, causing concern among clinic operators who worry her release could spark a new wave of attacks. Rachelle "Shelley" Shannon, whose actions triggered a federal investigation into the possible existence of a nationwide conspiracy of anti-abortion terrorists intent on shutting down abortion clinics, left the Waseca Federal Correctional Facility in Minnesota on Monday and was being transported by bus to Portland, where she will be staying in a halfway house, according to her friends. Officials with the U.S. Attorney's Office in Portland

  • Social media under microscope in emotive Irish abortion vote
    Pueblo Chieftain

    Social media under microscope in emotive Irish abortion vote

    In homes and pubs, on leaflets and lampposts, debate rages in Ireland over whether to lift the country's decades-old ban on abortion. Pro-repeal banners declare: "Her choice: vote yes." Anti-abortion placards warn against a "license to kill." Online, the argument is just as charged _ and more shadowy _ as unregulated ads of uncertain origin battle to sway voters ahead of Friday's referendum, which could give Irish women the right to end their pregnancies for the first time.

  • About-face on abortion fellowship leaves U with whiplash
    Star Tribune

    About-face on abortion fellowship leaves U with whiplash

    Bowing to pressure from conservative students and lawmakers, the University of Minnesota has backed out of a grant-funded fellowship to expand the practice and training of reproductive health and abortion services. The fellowship, approved by one faculty member last fall, became political dynamite this spring after triggering outrage among abortion opponents and some lawmakers just as the Legislature was considering a budget request from the U and a vacancy on the Board of Regents. Now university leaders are being criticized on all sides — from abortion advocates, for "caving" to pressure; from abortion opponents, for leaving the door open to the fellowship next year; and from at least one legislator