What time is the April 8 solar eclipse? Here’s when to see it from 10 Kansas cities

The 2024 solar eclipse is just days away, and even though Wichita won’t see it in totality, city residents will still be able to see approximately 87.59% of the sun blocked out during the event.

During April 8’s rare total solar eclipse, the moon will pass between the sun and the Earth, which will completely block out the face of the sun for areas in the path of totality.

If you’re planning on catching a glimpse of the eclipse, be sure to know when the best time to step outside is so you don’t miss the event’s peak.

April 8’s total solar eclipse will completely block the sun’s light and create a 115-mile-wide “path of totality” across much of the U.S. Those outside the path will see a partial solar eclipse.
April 8’s total solar eclipse will completely block the sun’s light and create a 115-mile-wide “path of totality” across much of the U.S. Those outside the path will see a partial solar eclipse.

What time is the 2024 solar eclipse over Kansas?

According to global online clock Time and Date, the eclipse will begin in Wichita at 12:31 p.m. and end at 3:06 p.m. But if you want to just see the eclipse at its peak, instead of sitting through the nearly three-hour event, be sure to be outside before 1:48 p.m., which is when the height of the partial eclipse will be seen in Wichita.

Here are some times the eclipse will begin, peak and end in other Kansas cities, from Time and Date:

  • Newton: Begins at 12:32 p.m. and ends at 3:06 p.m. Peaks at 1:49 p.m.

  • Derby: Begins at 12:31 p.m. and ends at 3:06 p.m. Peaks at 1:48 p.m.

  • Hutchinson: Begins at 12:31 p.m. and ends at 3:05 p.m. Peaks at 1:48 p.m.

  • Salina: Begins at 12:33 p.m. and ends at 3:06 p.m. Peaks at 1:49 p.m.

  • Topeka: Begins at 12:36 p.m. and ends at 3:09 p.m. Peaks at 1:53 p.m.

  • Lawrence: Begins at 12:36 p.m. and ends at 3:10 p.m. Peaks at 1:53 p.m.

  • Olathe: Begins at 12:37 p.m. and ends at 3:10 p.m. Peaks at 1:54 p.m.

  • Osage City: Begins at 12:35 p.m. and ends at 3:09 p.m. Peaks at 1:52 p.m.

  • Overland Park: Begins at 12:37 p.m. and ends at 3:11 p.m. Peaks at 1:54 p.m.

The last solar eclipse occurred last October, but was a partial eclipse. This happened when the moon passed between the sun and the Earth when it was farthest from the Earth, which caused a ring effect around the moon.

Ways to view the April 8 eclipse safely

If you’re planning on stepping outside during the event, be sure to stay safe. Even though the sun is partially blocked, it’s still unsafe to look directly at it without proper eye protection.

Eclipse glasses can be bought from box stores like Home Depot and Lowe’s in Wichita, while other stores could hop on the trend ahead of the eclipse. The Kansas Lions Sight Foundation will sell and donate eclipse glasses to the public, as well.

If you can’t snag a pair of eclipse glasses in time, there are other ways to indirectly view the eclipse.

NASA recommends using a pinhole projector. You can make these at home yourself with a cardboard box, white paper, tape, scissors and aluminum foil.

Tape the white paper on the inside end of the box and on the other end, cut out a section and cover it with the foil. Poke a small hole in the foil, and on the other side of that same end, cut a section out large enough for you to view from.