Spacewalk may be needed to fix space station leak

SETH BORENSTEIN
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FILE - This May 23, 2011 file photo released by NASA shows the International Space Station at an altitude of approximately 220 miles above the Earth, taken by Expedition 27 crew member Paolo Nespoli from the Soyuz TMA-20 following its undocking. NASA on Thursday, May 9, 2013 said the International Space Station has a radiator leak in its power system. The outpost's commander calls the situation serious, but not life-threatening. (AP Photo/NASA, Paolo Nespoli, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two astronauts on the International Space Station are preparing for a possible impromptu spacewalk to work on a leaking coolant line.

NASA spokesman Rob Navias (NA'-vee-us) says the line will run out of ammonia coolant late Friday morning. The line chills power systems but power was rerouted and is operating normally. The six-member crew is not in danger.

NASA will decide Friday evening if the spacewalk is needed on Saturday.

NASA suspects the leak might be on the far left truss of the station, but doesn't know for sure.

If needed, U.S. astronauts Chris Cassidy and Tom Marshburn would make about a six-hour spacewalk. They have trained for this type of repair.