Son of ‘General Hospital’ stars Jack and Kristina Wagner died from accidental overdose, officials say

The cause of death for Harrison Wagner, the son of “General Hospital” stars Jack and Kristina Wagner has been confirmed by the Los Angeles County Medical Examiner.

In the report, which was obtained by TODAY.com, Harrison Wagner’s death was labeled an “accident” and the cause listed was “Fentanyl and Alprazolam intoxication.”

Harrison Wagner’s body was found in a North Hollywood, California, parking lot in the early hours of the morning on June 6. The 27-year-old was pronounced dead at the scene, a spokesperson for the Los Angeles County Medical Examiner’s Office told NBC News at the time.

A photo of Harrison Wagner on his Instagram account. (@harrisonwagner via Instagram )
A photo of Harrison Wagner on his Instagram account. (@harrisonwagner via Instagram )

Prior to the medical examiner report, the Wagner family shared that Harrison Wagner had “lost his battle with addiction” in a post about “The Harrison Wagner Scholarship Fund” that his parents created.

“We are heartbroken that he ultimately lost his battle with addiction and we hope that Harrison’s memory will live on through this scholarship and will help other young men get help for their addiction that would not otherwise be able to afford it,” they wrote.

Jack, 63, and Kristina Wagner, 60, tied the knot in 1993 and also share 32-year-old son Peter. The former couple previously appeared together on the ABC soap opera “General Hospital” for years. They divorced in 2006.

A month after his son’s death, Jack Wagner thanked his fans for the “love and kindness” he received during the difficult time.

“I can’t tell you how much it means to me,” he said in an Instagram video message.

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At the end of the clip, he said, “I’m sending it right back to you so we’ll be in touch.”

In honor of what would have been Harrison Wagner’s 28th birthday on Dec. 1, Kristina Wagner wrote a heartbreaking tribute for her son on Instagram.

She uploaded a video of Harrison Wagner dancing in the middle of a festive street.

“Sometimes I feel like a pinned butterfly,” she began in the emotional caption. “There’s no second chance. There’s no see-him-again. There’s no nothing. He’s not coming back. It’s final. But life goes on.”

The soap opera star questioned how she could live her life without having her son by her side.

“What does it mean to be ‘all right’ after the death of your child, your blood?” she asked. “The pain will never go away.”

The actor described Harrison Wagner as a vulnerable and compassionate person with a larger than life personality.

She wrote, “He understood his own defects and worked hard to turn them around, to strengthen his positive attributes. He was a good listener and stood up for others when they couldn’t speak for themselves. He is missed.”

Kristina Wagner ended the tribute by wishing her son a happy birthday and hoping that other grieving parents somehow find peace.

“Let’s stick around and see what’s in store for our extraordinary lives,” she said.

Brother Peter Wagner also remembered his younger brother on his Instagram page.

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He shared a photo of Harrison Wanger and praised him. The older brother wrote, “Your spirit is divine and you lift me up every day. Your words ‘I got you bro’ are everything to me and I feel you looking after me, mom, and dad.”

Peter Wagner added, “I will be strong for you. As you were for me.”

Prior to the medical examiner report, the Wagner family shared that Harrison Wagner had “lost his battle with addiction” in a post about “The Harrison Wagner Scholarship Fund” that his parents created.

“We are heartbroken that he ultimately lost his battle with addiction and we hope that Harrison’s memory will live on through this scholarship and will help other young men get help for their addiction that would not otherwise be able to afford it,” they wrote.

This article was originally published on TODAY.com