In settlement, 10 Wisconsin 'fake electors' admit Joe Biden won 2020 election

UPI
Ten Wisconsin Republicans who intended to act as so-called "fake electors" have agreed that Joe Biden won the 2020 presidential election as part of a civil settlement. Originally, the 10 had hoped to overturn the presidential election results by enlisting the help of then-Vice President Mike Pence (C). File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI
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Dec. 6 (UPI) -- Ten Wisconsin Republicans accused of acting as so-called "fake electors" during the 2020 presidential election have agreed to a settlement and acknowledged that they were part of a coordinated effort to overturn the presidential election in favor of Donald Trump.

The scheme would have been set into place had then-Vice President Mike Pence certified the alternate electors' statements, but Pence refused to participate.

In December 2020, the Biden campaign filed a $2.4 million lawsuit against Republicans.

The defendants did not have to pay money but did release a statement affirming the results of the 2020 election and have admitted to the existence of a plot to overturn the results.

The former electors agreed that Joe Biden was the winner of the election and that they would not serve as electors in any election in which Donald Trump is a candidate.

"We hereby reaffirm that Josph R. Biden, Jr. won the 2020 presidential election and that we were not the duly elected presidential electors for the State of Wisconsin for the 2020 election," the individuals said in a statement. "We oppose any attempt to undermine the public's faith in the ultimate results of the 2020 presidential election."

The defendants did not admit to any wrongdoing and said that the Trump campaign and Wisconsin Republican Party requested that they compose a document called "Certificate of Votes of the 2020 Electors from Wisconsin."

The defendants said the "document was then used as part of an attempt to improperly overturn the 2020 presidential election results."

The defendants also agreed "to fully cooperate with plaintiffs in the litigation of this civil action against any remaining defendants."

The Trump campaign has been accused of trying to use so-called "fake electors" in multiple other states, including Michigan, where the Attorney General filed charges against 16 Republicans for a similar scheme.