Senators express doubts to Barra about new GM

FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2009 file photo, the General Motors logo is seen on display at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Congress, the Justice Department and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are all investigating General Motors Co.’s recall of 2.6 million vehicles for an ignition switch defect which can cause the car to stall and deactivate the air bags. GM links the defect to 13 deaths and more than two dozen crashes.(AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — General Motors CEO Mary Barra is back before Congress, where members of a Senate subcommittee are expressing doubts that the culture at the nation's No. 1 automaker has really changed.

On Tuesday, Barra tried to convey to a House committee that GM is now more focused on safety, saying mistakes made in the past wouldn't happen at "today's GM."

But Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., on Wednesday said the new GM, which emerged from bankruptcy in 2009, had ample time to recall cars equipped with a faulty ignition switch that is linked to at least 13 deaths. GM began recalling the cars this February.

"Even under the new GM banner, the company waited nine months to take action after being confronted with this egregious violation of public trust" McCaskill said.