Scooters face scrutiny by doctors and lawmakers

MATTHEW PERRONE

WASHINGTON (AP) — TV ads show smiling seniors enjoying an "active" lifestyle on a motorized scooter, taking in the sites at the Grand Canyon, fishing on a pier and high-fiving their grandchildren at a baseball game.

The commercials, which promise freedom and independence to people with limited mobility, have driven the nearly $1 billion U.S. market for power wheelchairs and scooters. But the spots by the industry's two leading companies, The Scooter Store and Hoveround, also have drawn scrutiny from doctors and lawmakers, who say they create the false impression that scooters are a convenient means of transportation rather than a medical necessity.