Science

  • ABC News

    Testing Confirms New, Rarely Seen Whale in Pacific Ocean

    A team of international scientists has confirmed a new whale species in the northern Pacific Ocean. The black beaked whale grows to about 24 feet long. It once was thought to be a dwarf variety of Baird's beaked whales, but genetic testing has shown the animal is a unique species. Research molecular biologist Phillip Morin and other authors conducted tests on 178 beaked whale specimens from around the Pacific Rim. Their research was published this week in the scientific journal Marine Mammal Science. Morin says large beaked whales are hard to study because they dive for up to 90 minutes at a time into deep water hunting for squid. He says they spend little time on the surface, rarely breach and

  • Make paydays the easiest day of your week

    Make paydays the easiest day of your week

    Looking for a fast and easy way to ensure your payroll checks always go out on time? This free and easy-to-use paycheck calculator will do the trick.

  • ABC News

    European Space Agency Cuts Radio Link to Comet Lander

    The European Space Agency says it is switching off its radio link to the probe that landed on a comet, after receiving no signal from the lander for a year. The agency says the decision to shut down a communications instrument on the Rosetta spacecraft Wednesday was taken to conserve energy. Rosetta had used the instrument to communicate with its lander, Philae, which touched down on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014. During the next two months, Rosetta will use its remaining power to conduct scientific measurements before it crash-lands on the comet Sept. 30. Data collected by Rosetta and Philae have improved scientists' understanding of comets and the role they played in the

  • LiveScience.com

    Police Killings and Race: Do the Numbers Tell the Whole Story?

    Police officers in the U.S. are more likely to stop or arrest black, Hispanic and Native American people than they are to stop or arrest non-Hispanic white people, a new study finds. The researchers also found that more blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans were killed and injured by police over the study period than non-Hispanic whites. "Both blacks and white Hispanics are four times as likely to be killed by the police as white non-Hispanics are," said lead study author Ted Miller, a senior research scientist at the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation in Maryland.

  • New crop of robots to vie for space in the operating room
    Reuters

    New crop of robots to vie for space in the operating room

    By Susan Kelly CHICAGO (Reuters) - Even though many doctors see need for improvement, surgical robots are poised for big gains in operating rooms around the world. Robotic surgery has been long dominated by pioneer Intuitive Surgical Inc, which has more than 3,600 of its da Vinci machines in hospitals worldwide and said last week the number of procedures that used them jumped by 16 percent in the second quarter compared to a year earlier. The anticipated future growth - and perceived weaknesses of the current generation of robots - is attracting deep-pocketed rivals, including Medtronic Inc and a startup backed by Johnson & Johnson and Google.

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    HPE Hybrid Infrastructure

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  • This Mysterious Purple Orb May Be A Newly Discovered Species
    NowThis

    This Mysterious Purple Orb May Be A Newly Discovered Species

    Scientists on the EV Nautilus discovered this mysterious purple orb that may be a never before seen creature.

  • The story behind the star-studded film that schooled Donald Trump on climate change
    Mashable

    The story behind the star-studded film that schooled Donald Trump on climate change

    Hillary Clinton’s campaign is hoping to capitalize on yet another controversial proclamation from Donald Trump: That global warming is a hoax. Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, has said he rejects the scientific consensus on climate change and opposes most U.S. efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and curb fossil fuel use. Trump’s anti-climate stance is the focus of a new short film, directed by James Cameron, that will play tonight at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

  • Black-footed ferrets return to where they held out in wild
    Associated Press

    Black-footed ferrets return to where they held out in wild

    A nocturnal species of weasel with a robber-mask-like marking across its eyes has returned to the remote ranchlands of western Wyoming where the critter almost went extinct more than 30 years ago. Wildlife officials on Tuesday released 35 black-footed ferrets on two ranches near Meeteetse, a tiny cattle ranching community 50 miles east of Yellowstone National Park. Black-footed ferrets, generally solitary animals, were let loose individually over a wide area.

  • Impressive Driving Range

    Impressive Driving Range

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  • Latest El Nino weather pattern over, but storms could follow: UN
    AFP

    Latest El Nino weather pattern over, but storms could follow: UN

    The latest El Nino weather phenomenon, which was one of the most powerful on record, has ended but could be replaced by its stormy sister La Nina in the coming months, the UN meteorological agency said Thursday. "Atmospheric indicators that had shown strong El Nino patterns early in 2016 returned to near-average in June and July," the World Meteorological Organization said. El Nino affects rainfall patterns and causes both drought and flooding.

  • China claims it has discovered the world's largest hole, and it's in one of the most dangerous places on the planet
    Business Insider

    China claims it has discovered the world's largest hole, and it's in one of the most dangerous places on the planet

    Good news: China claims it has discovered the world's largest hole. On Wednesday, state broadcaster CCTV announced that the newly found "dragon's hole," a 984-foot (300-meter) cavern in the disputed waters of the South China Sea, is now the world's largest hole. With territorial claims by Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei, the Philippines, Taiwan, and China, the South China Sea — rich in natural resources and crisscrossed by shipping routes — is one of the most militarized areas on the planet. According to Xinhua, the blue hole is called the "eye" by locals and lies within the disputed Paracel Islands, which is claimed by China and Taiwan and Vietnam.

  • How Ancient Polynesian Sailors Navigated the Ocean
    Popular Mechanics

    How Ancient Polynesian Sailors Navigated the Ocean

    Maps can tell us a great deal about the world we live in. Maps are how we find our way in the world, and how we relate to the other places and things around us. Rebbelib are made of bamboo sticks and cowrie shells, with the shells denoting the locations of islands in the chain.

  • Security Camera Systems: Going Wireless

    Security Camera Systems: Going Wireless

    Security camera systems allow you to keep your family and property protected from criminal activity. See why many homeowners are making the switch.

  • New clues emerge about missing flight MH370's possible crash site
    Mashable

    New clues emerge about missing flight MH370's possible crash site

    The mysterious, missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 likely crashed off the coast of Australia or hundreds of miles to the north, researchers in Italy said. The potential crash area overlaps with the underwater zone that investigators are now scouring for hunks of metal debris. Search efforts have so far failed to reveal why and where the airliner wrecked more than two years ago, taking with it 239 passengers and crew members.

  • Where Kennewick Man Stands, 20 Years After Discovery
    Time

    Where Kennewick Man Stands, 20 Years After Discovery

    A legal saga involving five Native American tribes and a group of scientists—which may now be drawing to a close—began on July 28, 1996. On that day, exactly 20 years ago, their differences of perspective were thrown into dramatic relief with the discovery of a skull on the bottom of the Columbia River near Kennewick, Wash. The coroner called in a forensic anthropologist, Jim Chatters, and the two returned to the site where the skull was found, where they unearthed a nearly complete skeleton.

  • LiveScience.com

    How to Talk About Race to Kids: Experts' Advice for Parents

    These questions affect parents and children of every race and ethnicity, and though the substance of individual conversations may differ, the underlying advice on how to talk to kids doesn't change, experts said: Meet them where they are, encourage openness and don't expect that a single conversation will cover the topic. "It's OK to make a mistake," in conversation with a child, said Kimberly Seals Allers, the founder of MochaManual.com, an online destination for parents of color. Black parents don't have the luxury of ignoring color, Allers told Live Science.

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  • Ice Bucket Challenge funds contribute to discovery of gene linked to ALS
    ABC News

    Ice Bucket Challenge funds contribute to discovery of gene linked to ALS

    The Ice Bucket Challenge is being credited with helping to raise significant funds that have allowed researchers to identify a gene found to be one of the most common in people with the deadly disease that affects neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The Challenge became a sensation two summers ago and involved participants, including many athletes and celebrities, pouring ice water over their heads to help raise awareness of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The effort raised more than $100 million in contributions for the ALS Association, which contributed $1 million to the Project MinE research project. "The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge enabled us to secure funding from new sources in new parts of the world," said Bernard Muller, an entrepreneur who suffers from the progressive disease and helped start the research project.

  • Associated Press

    House GOP chairman threatens more action on climate probe

    The chairman of the House Science Committee threatened further action Wednesday after the New York and Massachusetts attorneys general refused to comply with congressional subpoenas seeking records about their investigations into whether Exxon Mobil misled investors about man-made climate change. Texas GOP Rep. Lamar Smith said he was disappointed that New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey refused to comply with subpoenas he issued two weeks ago.

  • Mysterious purple sea orb stymies scientists
    Fox News

    Mysterious purple sea orb stymies scientists

    "Have a look at that dark purple blob on the left, there." With those words, scientists aboard the Exploration Vessel Nautilus uncovered a marine mystery: a small purple orb tucked halfway under a rock off the coast of California. Researchers are so far stumped as to what the colorful, bumpy little ball might be. Their best guess is that it might be a gastropod (a mollusk such as a snail or slug that belongs to the class Gastropoda) called a pleurobranch — and possibly a new species. "None of the known species of California pleurobranch are purple," said Susan Poulton, a spokeswoman for the E/V Nautilus expeditions. [Gallery: See Images of the Mysterious Purple Orb] Oddball creature The odd little

  • Cher Fans Mourning

    Cher Fans Mourning

    Cher fans were upset over the confusing hashtag mix-up that occurred on Twitter.

  • US military bases at risk from sea level rise: study
    AFP

    US military bases at risk from sea level rise: study

    US military bases along the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico will be increasingly vulnerable to floods and power-packed storms as the planet warms, researchers said Wednesday. The report by the Union of Concerned Scientists spanned 18 military bases, and found that many risk losing land and strategic assets in the coming decades due to sea level rise. The analysis was based on two different projections of sea level rise and how it may affect US bases from Florida to Maine.

  • Reuters

    Scientists find potential new antibiotic, right under their noses

    By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists in Germany have discovered a bacteria hiding out in peoples' noses that produces an antibiotic compound that can kill several dangerous pathogens, including the superbug MRSA. The early-stage finding, reported in the journal Nature on Wednesday, could one day lead to a whole new class of antibiotic medicines being developed to fight drug-resistant bacterial infections, the researchers said. As well as being a focal point for many viral infections, the nasal cavity is also a rich ecosystem of 50 or so different species of bacteria, lead researcher Andreas Peschel of the University of Tuebingen told reporters in a telephone briefing.

  • Bayer's strong second-quarter figures make weak case for higher Monsanto bid
    The Street

    Bayer's strong second-quarter figures make weak case for higher Monsanto bid

    Bayer's (BAYRY) second-quarter figures are the financial equivalent of a glass half-full and half-empty for the German company's management as it ponders the merits of improving a rejected $63.5 billion bid for Monsanto (MON) . The better-than-expected earnings of €3.05 billion ($3.35 billion) lent heavily on the Leverkusen, Germany-based company's strong pharmaceuticals business and, in doing so, highlighted problems at its agricultural division. For the Monsanto takeover's cheerleaders, including Bayer CEO Werner Baumann, crop science's weakness may be seen as justification for the acquisition. In this narrative the Monsanto purchase will supercharge performance at an underperforming business by creating the world's largest agricultural chemicals and seeds business.

  • How much can you actually save by refinancing?

    How much can you actually save by refinancing?

    Rates now at 3.04% APR 5/1 ARM- $250K for $1054/mo. LendingTree's simple online tool to help determine how much you could be saving by refinancing.

  • Science behind washing your jeans yields unexpected results
    Digital Trends

    Science behind washing your jeans yields unexpected results

    Let’s start with the ending: you don’t need to wash your jeans. Unless there are spots or stains you want to remove or they’ve just gotten terribly dirty, with normal wear jeans don’t need washing, according to Tech Insider. Given the wide selection of

  • Scalding-hot temperatures above the solar system's largest storm might solve a longstanding mystery about Jupiter
    Business Insider

    Scalding-hot temperatures above the solar system's largest storm might solve a longstanding mystery about Jupiter

    Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is the largest storm in the solar system. Located in Jupiter's lower atmosphere, this storm living is so big that you could fit two or three Earths inside of it. Now, a team of scientists at Boston University believe that it might just offer an explanation for one of the biggest mysteries about Jupiter.

  • Huge Quake for the Himalayas? Ancient Hindu Temples Hold Clues
    LiveScience.com

    Huge Quake for the Himalayas? Ancient Hindu Temples Hold Clues

    Past earthquakes that damaged ancient temples perched high in the Himalayas could be harbingers of dangerous quakes to come, new research suggests. "The supporting pillars and temple structures are tilted with respect to their original positions.

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    Hilton HHonors™ Card

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  • Washington scientist launches effort to digitize all fish
    Associated Press

    Washington scientist launches effort to digitize all fish

    University of Washington biology professor Adam Summers no longer has to coax hospital staff to use their CT scanners so he can visualize the inner structures of stingray and other fish. Last fall, he installed a small computed tomography, or CT, scanner at the UW's Friday Harbor Laboratories on San Juan Island in Washington state and launched an ambitious project to scan and digitize all of more than 25,000 species in the world.

  • Why Molten Iron Just Isn't Attracted to Rare Earth Magnets
    Popular Mechanics

    Why Molten Iron Just Isn't Attracted to Rare Earth Magnets

    For his latest experiment, he got his hands on a large rare earth magnet, and then used thermite to melt down iron to pour down on and near the magnet. The molten iron doesn't react to the magnet-it's only when the iron has cooled that anything seems to happen. The answer is what's known as the Curie point.