Science

  • Remarkable 3,000-Year-Old Community Dubbed the 'British Pompeii'
    Good Morning America

    Remarkable 3,000-Year-Old Community Dubbed the 'British Pompeii'

    Archaeologists have uncovered a 3,000-year-old, remarkably well-preserved community near Peterborough, England. The excavation at Must Farms, by the Cambridge Archaeological Unit, has unearthed a trove of textiles, pottery and tools that reveal new insights into the lives of our ancestors. The sudden destruction, and then subsequent preservation in the river's non-porous silt, caused many of the artifacts to be preserved incredibly well, archaeologist wrote on their online diary, documenting the findings.

  • Loudoun’s Lowest Priced 3-Level Garage Townhomes

    Loudoun’s Lowest Priced 3-Level Garage Townhomes

    Loudoun County’s most affordable garage townhomes with community amenities & small town warmth. From the low $300s

  • Kerry urges phasing-out of toxic greenhouse gases
    AFP

    Kerry urges phasing-out of toxic greenhouse gases

    US Secretary of State John Kerry on Friday urged signatories of an international ozone pact to back the phasing-out of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) -- toxic greenhouse gases thousands of times more potent than carbon dioxide. "Climate change is happening – and it is happening quicker than most of us ever anticipated," Kerry said. "Week after week, month after month, year after year, we continue to see new evidence, tangible evidence, of the danger climate change poses to our planet.

  • Scientists Looking for Invisible Dark Matter Can't Find Any
    ABC News

    Scientists Looking for Invisible Dark Matter Can't Find Any

    Scientists have come up empty-handed in their latest effort to find elusive dark matter, the plentiful stuff that helps galaxies like ours form. For three years, scientists have been looking for dark matter — which though invisible, makes up more than four-fifths of the universe's matter — nearly a mile underground in a former gold mine in Lead, South Dakota. "We're sort of proud that it worked so well and also disappointed that we didn't see anything," said University of California, Berkeley physicist Daniel McKinsey, one of two scientific spokesmen for the mostly government-funded project. The mine project, called Large Underground Xenon experiment or LUX, was one of three places looking for dark matter.

  • 'Witch' Prison Revealed in 15th-Century Scottish Chapel
    LiveScience.com

    'Witch' Prison Revealed in 15th-Century Scottish Chapel

    An iron ring set in the stone pillar of a 15th-century chapel in the Scottish city of Aberdeen may not look like much, but historians say it could be a direct link to a dark chapter in the city’s past — the trial and execution of 23 women and one man accused of witchcraft during Aberdeen's "Great Witch Hunt" in 1597. "I was skeptical, to be honest — the ring is not all that spectacular, but it is actually quite genuine," said Arthur Winfield, project leader for the OpenSpace Trust in the United Kingdom, which is restoring the chapel as part of a community-based redevelopment of the East Kirk sanctuary at the historic Kirk of St Nicholas, in central Aberdeen. Winfield told Live Science that two places within the kirk (the Lowland Scots word for "church") had been equipped as a prison for witches snared in the Aberdeen witch hunt: the stone-vaulted chapel of St Mary, and the tall steeple of the kirk, which was at that time the tallest structure in the city.

  • Endless Amenities in Chantilly

    Endless Amenities in Chantilly

    Get city convenience with suburban comfort in a new condo at East Gate. Pool, clubhouse, walking paths and more near major commuter routes—low $300s

  • Astonishingly detailed brain map doubles the number of known areas in the cortex
    Digital Trends

    Astonishingly detailed brain map doubles the number of known areas in the cortex

    “The map that’s been used in brain imaging for as long as I can remember is a map made more than 100 years ago,” Matthew Glasser of Washington University in St. Louis, one of the paper’s authors, tells Digital Trends. “It’s a 2D schematic map, which researchers continue to look at when they’ve got new own data to try and see where a particular brain activation is taking place. It’s a good thing that Glasser did, because the new research carried out by himself and colleagues has resulted in a wholly new topographic map of the brain: with 180 cortical regions in total, of which 97 are completely new.

  • Bangladesh: Hidden fault could trigger quake
    CNN

    Bangladesh: Hidden fault could trigger quake

    While the fault lines in this region have been known about for some time, most believed the subduction, and thus the major earthquake threat, had long since ended. Studying the motion of the plates and looking for evidence of seismic movements in Bangladesh is extremely difficult. Steckler, the lead author of the study, described the subduction zone as being "filled with sediments from the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta," causing the fault to be "blind, totally covered by sediments, so in places we only infer its existence." This study utilized more than 10 years' worth of data from highly precise GPS receivers placed around northeast India, Bangladesh and Myanmar. The results allowed the researchers

  • Russian balloonist circling globe crosses Australian coast
    Associated Press

    Russian balloonist circling globe crosses Australian coast

    A 65-year-old Russian adventurer reached the Australian coast on Saturday and was within a few hours of setting a new record for flying solo nonstop around the world, an official said. Fedor Konyukhov's 56-meter (184-foot) -tall helium and hot-air balloon was descending as it crossed the southwest coast directly over the city of Perth at 95 kilometers (60 miles) per hour and at an altitude of less than 7,000 meters (23,000 feet), support crew member Steve Griffin said. When he drifts across 117 degrees longitude east of Perth, he will have shaved two days off the record of 13 days and eight hours set by American businessman Steve Fossett in 2002.

  • HPE: Accelerating Next

    HPE: Accelerating Next

    How Powerful Are Your Analytics? HPE Helps Drive Business Decisions.

  • Hillary Clinton's potential VP could be bad for the environment
    Newsweek

    Hillary Clinton's potential VP could be bad for the environment

    This story was originally published by Mother Jones and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Tom Vilsack is a trendy guy—but only if by "trendy," you mean "normcore." He has spent the past eight years as secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture—the country cousin of presidential cabinet positions. He's a solid centrist Democrat from Iowa, where he served two terms as governor as well as a stint as mayor of a town called Mt. Pleasant (pop. 8,668). He even calls himself a "workhorse, not a show horse." But he has been generating massive buzz as the possible vice presidential pick of presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, recently catapulting to the upper

  • So, Space Shuttle Pilot Eileen Collins Speaking at the RNC. That Was Interesting
    Wired News

    So, Space Shuttle Pilot Eileen Collins Speaking at the RNC. That Was Interesting

    Ted Cruz wasn’t the only speaker who didn’t endorse Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention last night. First there was Eileen Collins, the first female space shuttle pilot and commander. Her decision to speak at a convention honoring Trump—a man known for expressing opinions on many things, space exploration not among them—had puzzled some in the space community. So when she got to the end of her speech, the omission was notable. The prewritten text of Collins’ speech ended with, “We need leadership that will make America great again. That leader is Donald Trump.” But she never said the last sentence. Collins has been critical of the Obama administration and NASA’s current mission

  • Next week, a meteor shower created by a mysterious comet will reach its peak — here’s how to watch
    Business Insider

    Next week, a meteor shower created by a mysterious comet will reach its peak — here’s how to watch

    The Perseids, one of the most popular meteor showers of the year, is coming up in just under a month. Right now, we are in the middle of a meteor shower called the Delta Aquarids, which began around July 12. Around July 28 and 29, the Delta Aquarids will reach their peak.

  • New Treatment Options Available for Lung Disease

    New Treatment Options Available for Lung Disease

    Minimally invasive stem cell therapy is a treatment option that could help people with COPD, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, or pulmonary fibrosis.

  • In Mozambique, honey-hunters summon birds to guide them to beehives
    Los Angeles Times

    In Mozambique, honey-hunters summon birds to guide them to beehives

    The honey-hunter lets out a long trill, followed by a sharp grunt. Brrr-hm! On cue, a small bird flies to the hunter and responds with its own chattering noise. The greater honeyguide flits from tree to tree, searching for a beehive. Over thousands of years, honeyguides, named for their unusual relationship with people, have gained the ability to recognize and respond to specific calls made by the honey-hunters of Mozambique and Tanzania, according to a study published Thursday in Science. The relationship represents a rare example of cooperation between humans and wild animals. Humans have the tools to avoid angry bees and break open the nest; the birds have the nose to find them. The hunter,

  • Reuters

    EU approves Monsanto, Bayer genetically modified soybeans

    The European Commission on Friday approved imports of Monsanto's Roundup Ready 2 Xtend genetically modified soybean variety, after months of delays that had derailed the U.S. seed giant's product launch this spring. Rivals Cargill Inc, Bunge Ltd and CHS Inc, which had also refused to accept the variety without EU import approval, could not be immediately reached for comment. The EU is the second largest importer of soybeans and its approval is not expected to have a major impact on merger talks by German suitor Bayer AG, whose sweetened $64-billion buyout offer of Monsanto was rejected last week, as it had been widely anticipated, analysts said on Friday.

  • Robot with Sea Slug Parts Makes Hybrid Debut
    LiveScience.com

    Robot with Sea Slug Parts Makes Hybrid Debut

    Researchers have developed a hybrid robot built with body parts from a novel source: sea slugs. The new robot combines a Y-shaped muscle from the mouth of a California sea hare (Aplysia californica) with a 3D-printed skeleton. The robot was modeled after the way sea turtles crawl, because the researchers wanted to create something that could move with only one Y-shaped muscle, study lead author Victoria Webster, a graduate student at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, told Live Science in an email.

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    Platinum Delta Card

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  • New advance in 3D graphics may make the next Avengers movie look even more realistic
    Digital Trends

    New advance in 3D graphics may make the next Avengers movie look even more realistic

    In short, they’ve figured out how to improve the way graphics software can render light as it interacts with extremely small details on the surface of materials. As a brief explainer, the reflection of light emanating from a material’s small details is called “glints,” and until now, graphics software could only render glints in stills. Ramamoorthi and his colleagues plan to reveal their rendering method at SIGGRAPH 2016 in Anaheim, California, later this month.

  • Parents, Son Lived Frugally Despite Stealing Millions of Dollars: Part 4
    ABC News Videos

    Parents, Son Lived Frugally Despite Stealing Millions of Dollars: Part 4

    Archie Cabello bought bottles of wine and cigars, while his wife had a thing for kitchen appliances and cooking magazines.

  • Germany and China are beating the U.S. in energy efficiency
    Mashable

    Germany and China are beating the U.S. in energy efficiency

    The United States ranks No. 8 among the world's most energy-efficient nations, while the clean-energy powerhouse Germany holds the top slot, a new report found.  Oil-rich Saudi Arabia, perhaps unsurprisingly, landed with a thud at the bottom of the list

  • The Best of Both Worlds.

    The Best of Both Worlds.

    The 2015 Dodge Challenger Classic design meets powerful performance. Meet the Dodge Challenger. Your day just got a lot more interesting.

  • Chinese scientists to conduct first human gene-editing trial
    CNN

    Chinese scientists to conduct first human gene-editing trial

    Hong Kong (CNN)Chinese scientists will become the first in the world to inject people with cells modified using gene-editing technology in a groundbreaking clinical trial next month. A team led by Lu You, an oncologist at Sichuan University's West China Hospital in Chengdu, received ethical approval from the hospital's review board on July 6 to test gene-edited cells on lung cancer patients next month, according to scientific journal Nature. The cells will be modified using CRISPR-Cas9 -- a new method of genetic engineering that allows scientists to edit DNA with precision and relative ease. "This technique is of great promise in bringing benefits to patients, especially the cancer patients whom we treat every day," Lu told the journal.

  • Will space 'Trump' the RNC?
    The Hill

    Will space 'Trump' the RNC?

    Much can be and has been said about the Presidential campaign of Mr. Donald J. Trump, leading up to the U.S. Presidential Elections in 2016.  From an unprecedented self-examination of the electorate, to those watching from abroad, we collectively understand the weight of the Office he seeks, the history behind who has sat in the Oval Office before him, the impact of the seat of the Executive and the widespread ramifications for the rest of the world, come November’s elections—no matter the victor. The Republican and Democratic conventions are a political milestone in the race for the U.S. Presidency and given their commencement, I’d like to talk about one such particular milestone—A woman who's

  • There's a simple reason why one kind of trip gives you the worst jet lag — and you can use it to make your next trip a breeze
    Business Insider

    There's a simple reason why one kind of trip gives you the worst jet lag — and you can use it to make your next trip a breeze

    No matter how long it lasts, jet lag is never fun, and researchers still haven't found a "cure" for the bothersome side-effect. It turns out that our internal clocks are a bit laggy — they run a tad longer than 24 hours.

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    Melt away dirt, oil and makeup!

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  • The Republican Party Is on the Verge of Extinction
    Foreign Policy Magazine

    The Republican Party Is on the Verge of Extinction

    Seldom does the global public have an opportunity to observe an endangered species in its natural habitat, but this week, wildlife enthusiasts received a rare glimpse into the poignant final days of the American Republican elephant. Recently, however, some unknown constellation of events brought more than 2,000 surviving specimens of E. republicanus to a Cleveland watering hole known locally as the Quicken Loans Arena.

  • Removing Wylfa nuclear plant's radioactive fuel 'priority'
    BBC News

    Removing Wylfa nuclear plant's radioactive fuel 'priority'

    The push to recover used radioactive fuel from the last nuclear power station of its kind is under way. Wylfa nuclear plant's last reactor was turned off after 44 years at an outage ceremony on Anglesey in December. Workers have spent the past six months putting decommissioning plans into action, including a new safety regime. Removing 800 tonnes of spent Magnox fuel will now be the "dominant" focus over the next three years, officials have said. "Once we are fuel free, over 99% of all the radioactivity on the site will have left," said Gordon Malcolm, deputy site director at Wylfa. "Then the whole site moves on to the next phase of work, preparations for care and maintenance... which will last

  • Parasites hitch ride down Silk Road
    AFP

    Parasites hitch ride down Silk Road

    Merchants plying the ancient Silk Road between China and the Mediterranean moved more than gold, fabrics, spices and tea -- they also exported gut parasites, researchers said Friday. It has long been theorised that the Silk Road helped spread bubonic plague, leprosy, anthrax and other infectious diseases between East Asia, the Middle East and Europe -- though concrete archaeological evidence has been scant. The team from Britain and China examined faeces preserved on wood and bamboo sticks wrapped in cloth -- the toilet paper of their day -- that were excavated in 1992 at the Xuanquanzhi pit stop in north-west China.

  • "Shark Tank" Star Reveals #1 Mortgage Payoff Tip

    "Shark Tank" Star Reveals #1 Mortgage Payoff Tip

    If you're over 40 years old and you own a home, you need to read this. (It's not what you think!)

  • LiveScience.com

    Chickens May Help Repel Malaria-Carrying Mosquitoes

    In a perhaps unexpected finding, the smell of live chickens could help in the fight against malaria, new research shows. BecauseAnopheles mosquitoes primarily use their sense of smell to find hosts, the scientists collected hair, wool and feathers from the cattle, sheep, goats and chickens in the villages, identified scent compounds known as odorants that were unique to each and then investigated how well these odorants repelled the mosquitoes. "Chicken odorants acted as natural repellents," said study senior author Rickard Ignell, a chemical ecologist at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.

  • The Most Impossible Technology From 'Star Trek'
    Forbes

    The Most Impossible Technology From 'Star Trek'

    Fifty years ago, a new vision of humanity’s future first graced the world’s consciousness: the vision of Star Trek. The brainchild of creator Gene Roddenberry , it ran contrary to the dominant ethos of its time of a world filled with the pollution and destruction of humans, overrun with selfish, unethical behavior, war, strife and conflict. Instead of a dystopian future where humanity brought about our own destruction, this was a future where technology existed to further the peaceful goals and ideals common to all humans. This was a future where the dream of the United Nations was extended to not just all of Earth, but to a myriad of planets beyond our Solar System: a United Federation of Planets.