Science

  • Signs Jupiter's moon has an ocean beneath its surface
    CNBC.com

    Signs Jupiter's moon has an ocean beneath its surface

    NASA's Hubble Space telescope has found evidence that Jupiter's moon Europa has a global ocean beneath its icy surface. If there are actually plumes on the moon, it means scientists could explore the moon's subsurface ocean for chemicals, and even signs of life, without having to drill for miles through the moon's thick icy surface.

  • Pillar of Obama climate plan has its day in court
    AFP

    Pillar of Obama climate plan has its day in court

    The cornerstone of President Barack Obama's drive to fight global warming underwent close scrutiny Tuesday in a high-stakes day in court. The so-called Clean Power Plan, approved last year, sets state-by-state emissions targets for existing power plants and aims to reduce America's output of CO2 by nearly a third by 2030 as compared to 2005 levels. The court's action raised doubts about America's contribution to a historic accord to fight global warming, reached in December in Paris, and infuriated environmentalists around the world.

  • LiveScience.com

    In Shift, Most Americans Now Say President Should Release All Medical Records

    A majority of Americans now say that a U.S. president should release all of his or her medical information. The poll, which was conducted by Gallup last week, found that a slim majority of Americans, 51 percent, said that a president should release all medical information that might affect that person's ability to serve in office, whereas 46 percent said that a president should have the right to keep those medical records private. The new poll results are a change from the results in 2004, when just 38 percent of Americans said that a president should release all of his or her medical information, and 61 percent said that a president should be able to keep those records private, according to Gallup.

  • A baby with 3 biological parents was born using a new technique — here's what that means
    Business Insider

    A baby with 3 biological parents was born using a new technique — here's what that means

    A baby containing the DNA from three different people was born, New Scientist reports. Three-parent in-vitro fertilization (IVF) was approved in the UK back in 2015, but the team from the New Hope Fertility Center in New York performed the procedure in Mexico. The idea is to substitute that faulty mitochondrial DNA in a mother's egg with a third set of DNA from a donor's egg to avoid these inherited conditions.

  • African elephants 'suffer worst decline in 25 years'
    AFP

    African elephants 'suffer worst decline in 25 years'

    The number of African elephants has dropped by around 111,000 in the past decade, a new report released Sunday at the Johannesburg conference on the wildlife trade said, blaming the plummeting figures on poaching. The revelation, the worst drop in 25 years, came amid disagreement on the second day of the global meet over the best way to improve the plight of Africa's elephants, targeted for their tusks. With Namibia and Zimbabwe, wanting to be allowed to sell ivory stockpiles accrued from natural deaths to fund community elephant conservation initiatives, Zimbabwe's Environment Minister Oppah Muchinguri rejected the "imperialistic policies" of opposing countries, branding them a "clear infringement on the sovereign rights of nations".

  • Colossal wasps' nest found in attic is the stuff of nightmares
    Mashable

    Colossal wasps' nest found in attic is the stuff of nightmares

    LONDON — Is this a homeowner's skin-crawling nightmare? Or an impressive depiction of what happens when nature is left uninhibited?  In this case, the answer is a resounding "both".  SEE ALSO: Why 500 bees with tiny license plates will be released from

  • 1,000mph car gets major funding boost
    Ars Technica

    1,000mph car gets major funding boost

    On Monday morning, the Zhejiang Geely Holding Group—which owns Chinese car brand Geely as well as Volvo and the London Taxi Company—announced that it is now the main sponsor and official automotive partner of the Bloodhound SSC land speed record project. The three-year deal includes both financial and technical support for the project, as well as an extension of Bloodhound SSC's STEM in schools promotion across China. Richard Noble, the main driving force behind Bloodhound SSC (and both previous land speed records) said "We could not have a better partner than Geely: not only are they an international technology company with tremendous vision and capability, they share our passion for innovation

  • A Rare Black Moon Will Rise In the Sky on Friday Night
    Country Living

    A Rare Black Moon Will Rise In the Sky on Friday Night

    When it comes to rare lunar events, September 2016 seems to be the month that keeps on giving: This Friday, September 30, a Black Moon will rise in the skies of the Western Hemisphere, a phenomenon we haven't seen since March 2014. The Black Moon, which will occur at 8:11 p.m. ET on Friday, will only be happening in the Western Hemisphere because, technically, the new moon will happen on October 1 for the Eastern Hemisphere (they'll be getting their Black Moon at the end of next month). The next time we'll see a second new moon in a single calendar month in the Americas will be July 2019.

  • ABC News

    Mother Uncovers Lasting Impact of Son's Organ Donation

    An ultrasound showed one of Sarah Gray's unborn twins was missing part of his brain, a fatal birth defect. His brother was born healthy but Thomas lived just six days. Latching onto hope for something positive to come from heartache, Gray donated some of Thomas' tissue for scientific research — his eyes, his liver, his umbilical cord blood. Only no one could tell the Washington mother if that precious donation really made a difference. So Gray embarked on an unusual journey to find out, revealing a side of science that laymen seldom glimpse. "Infant eyes are like gold," a Harvard scientist told her. "I don't think people understand how valuable these donations are," said Gray, who hadn't grasped

  • SpaceX test fires rocket engine that could propel humans to Mars
    The Christian Science Monitor

    SpaceX test fires rocket engine that could propel humans to Mars

    In the latest step toward making humanity a “multiplanetary species,” SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk said Sunday that his company has successfully tested its groundbreaking Raptor engine. SpaceX has an ambitious schedule, seeking to send a manned mission to Mars by 2025, five years earlier than NASA, and, eventually, to colonize the Red Planet. Mr. Musk is due to flesh out some of the details surrounding these aspirations Tuesday, when he is to deliver a speech to the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico. At the heart of Musk’s plans lies the Raptor engine. Its mission statement is to serve spaceships with several times more power than the Merlin I engines

  • Vietnam fishermen sue Taiwan firm over mass fish deaths
    AFP

    Vietnam fishermen sue Taiwan firm over mass fish deaths

    Hundreds of fishermen in central Vietnam have filed lawsuits demanding more compensation from a Taiwanese firm accused of dumping toxic waste in the ocean that killed tonnes of fish, activists said Tuesday. The mass fish deaths in April ravaged livelihoods in communities along the central coast, where fishing is the main source of income. In a rare case of civic action against big business in authoritarian Vietnam, large crowds of fishermen have swamped a courthouse in Ha Tinh province since Monday to file 506 lawsuits against Taiwanese conglomerate Formosa.

  • U-2 Spy Plane Crash: Why 'Cold War' Aircraft Are Still Relevant Today
    LiveScience.com

    U-2 Spy Plane Crash: Why 'Cold War' Aircraft Are Still Relevant Today

    A U-2 spy plane that crashed in northern California earlier this week, killing one of the two pilots, focused attention on a normally clandestine aspect of the U.S. military. The U-2 plane has a long and storied history that stretches back to the late 1950s, but how is the reconnaissance aircraft used today? U-2 planes have been flown by the United States and other nations for more than 60 years, as both a spy plane and an instrument of science.

  • One of the original 'power posing' researchers now says its effects aren't real
    Business Insider

    One of the original 'power posing' researchers now says its effects aren't real

    Authored by Dana Carney and Andy Yap, then of Columbia University, as well as Amy Cuddy of Harvard, the study suggested that standing like Wonder Woman for two minutes could raise testosterone levels and reduce stress hormone levels temporarily. Cuddy gave a TED talk on power posing in 2012 that has been viewed 46 million times, and she's built a lucrative business based partly on the research that power posing works. Dana Carney, who today serves as a professor at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, recently published a report renouncing the effects of power posing.

  • India to ratify Paris Agreement climate pact on Oct. 2
    Mashable

    India to ratify Paris Agreement climate pact on Oct. 2

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi said India will ratify the Paris Agreement climate change pact on Oct 2. Modi’s announcement on Sunday is seen as a major boost to the implementation of measures at international level in an attempt to control global warming. Modi added that the country has chosen Oct. 2 to coincide with the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, who lived his entire live with minimum carbon footprint.

  • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    WashU receives $23.6 million science grant to understand how single cells work

    ST. LOUIS • A joint effort between Washington University and the University of Pennsylvania received a $23.6 million federal grant to start a new Science and Technology Center. The partnership, fueled by the five-year grant, creates the Science and Technology Center for Engineering MechanoBiology. It's an effort to understand how single cells work, what they react to and how they can be used or developed to prevent diseases, boost crop practices and more. Single cell organisms are the root of all plants and animals. "Being named an STC is a prestigious distinction reserved for sweeping research projects that have the power to change lives. We're ready to get to work," Guy Genin, principal researcher

  • Engadget

    Researchers think chaos theory can get us past Moore's Law

    Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, believed that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit would double every year or two. And, to his credit, that rule pretty much held out between 1965 and 2015, when the laws of physics began to get in the way. Now, researchers at North Carolina State believe that we don't need to obsess over ever-smaller transistors to make chips even more powerful. Instead, they've turned to chaos theory in the hope that mixing things up will provide the performance boost that Intel can't. Lead researcher Behnam Kia explains that we are now "reaching the limits of physics in terms of transistor size." If you've ever listened to one of Intel's presentations, you'll

  • Ehud Barak backs startup Reporty, touts emergency tech
    FOX News Videos

    Ehud Barak backs startup Reporty, touts emergency tech

    Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak tells Foxnews.coms James Rogers that startup Reporty Homeland Security will transform emergency systems

  • Drug Overdose Cluster in Canada Tied to Opioid-Laced Cocaine
    LiveScience.com

    Drug Overdose Cluster in Canada Tied to Opioid-Laced Cocaine

    More than 40 people in a Canadian city were treated for an opioid overdose this summer after they smoked crack cocaine that had been contaminated with an opioid drug related to fentanyl, according to a new report. In mid-July, a hospital in the city of Surrey, British Columbia, experienced a large spike in patients needing treatment for an opioid overdose — about 11 patients per day needed treatment, up from the usual four patients per day. Most of the patients had become unconscious after smoking what they thought was crack cocaine, the report said.

  • Elon Musk wants to populate Mars with 1 million people to save humanity
    Digital Trends

    Elon Musk wants to populate Mars with 1 million people to save humanity

    Elon Musk presented his vision of SpaceX’s eventual manned missions to Mars at IAC2016. During his presentation, the entrepreneur made a number of announcements regarding SpaceX’s goals for Martian landfall and colonizing Mars. Musk’s main point of discussion dealt primarily with SpaceX’s new massive Interplanetary Transport System, a system which utilizes three separate vehicles to make the trip to Mars and is key to Musk’s plan of making travel to Mars an obtainable reality for almost anyone.

  • Paris bans cars along part of River Seine
    AFP

    Paris bans cars along part of River Seine

    Strollers and cyclists can breathe easy on the banks of the Seine after Paris on Monday approved a plan to ban cars on a long stretch of riverside road cutting across the city. A centrepiece of her battle against pollution, the plan has divided opinion in the French capital. "We need to slow down a bit, let go, stop and relax," said Violetta Kolodziejczak, a restaurant greeter.

  • Benzinga

    The Search For Alien Life Begins With Just 3 People And $100 Million

    Suffice it to say, when you are a billionaire you can take on any sort of pet project you would like. Case in point, Facebook Inc (NASDAQ: FB) CEO Mark Zuckerberg is joining forces with fellow billionaire Yuri Milner and famed scientist Stephen Hawking to search for alien life on a nearby planet that has Earth-like characteristics.

  • Try riding a roller coaster to dislodge those painful kidney stones
    Los Angeles Times

    Try riding a roller coaster to dislodge those painful kidney stones

    Just ask any one of the 300,000 Americans who, in any given year, develop kidney stones: What if the excruciating pain of passing one of those little devils could be prevented by strapping yourself into a make-believe runaway mine train, throwing your hands in the air and enduring G-forces as high as 2.5 for about three minutes? In a bit of medical research inspired by strange and remarkable patient accounts, a Michigan State University urologist reports that, yes, riding a medium-intensity roller coaster such as the Disney theme parks’ Big Thunder Mountain Railroad can result in the painless passing of small, and even a few large, kidney stones. For best results, ride in the back, where — roller coaster afficionados all seem to agree — the thrills are greatest. Independent of kidney stone volume and location, findings reported Sunday in the the Journal of the American Osteopathic Assn. showed that sitting in the back of the roller coaster resulted in an average passage rate of 63.89%.

  • Melting Greenland ice threatens to expose Cold War waste
    AFP

    Melting Greenland ice threatens to expose Cold War waste

    A snow-covered former US army base in Greenland -- dubbed "a city under ice" -- could leak pollutants into the environment as the climate changes, raising difficult questions over who is responsible for a clean-up. In 1959, US army engineers began constructing a futuristic project in northwestern Greenland that might as well have been lifted from a Cold War spy movie. A network of tunnels under the snow contained everything from research facilities to a hospital, a cinema and a church -- all powered by a small, portable nuclear reactor.

  • Cosmos Magazine

    Boeing and AIMS team up to protect Great Barrier Reef

    The Great Barrier Reef stretches 2,300 kilometres down Australia's east coast – that's a lot of area to monitor. Aerospace manufacturer Boeing and the Australian Institute of Marine Science have signed a five-year agreement to develop advanced monitoring capabilities to better understand the health of the Great Barrier Reef. Brisbane-based engineers from Boeing will team up with marine scientists to develop innovative sea-to-space technologies including unmanned aerial vehicles, satellites and autonomous underwater vehicles. “Working with Boeing will provide an ideal platform from which we can paint a detailed picture of what is happening on the reef,” AIMS chief John Gunn, a member of the Great Barrier Reef Foundation’s International Science Advisory Committee, said in a press release.

  • Forbes

    Passive-Aggressive Fight Against Plutonium Economy Continues Unabated

    Late Friday afternoon, the Department of Energy released an updated performance report on the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). DOE’s internal Office of Project Management Oversight and Assessment in partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers produced the report using assumptions and data provided by DOE leadership. The report concludes that if the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) — the semi-independent branch of the DOE that is running the project — continues managing and supporting the MFFF with the same enthusiasm and oversight that it has been investing for the past half dozen years, the facility won’t be completed until 2048. It will cost $12.5 billion more than