Science

  • Massive wildfire near Los Angeles kills one person, forces thousands to flee
    Mashable

    Massive wildfire near Los Angeles kills one person, forces thousands to flee

    What began as a brush fire last Friday rapidly morphed into a raging blaze over the weekend, burning more than 33,000 acres and destroying at least 18 homes in Los Angeles County. Only about 10 percent of the wildfire was contained by Sunday night, the Los Angeles County Fire Department reported. “All the experience we’ve had with fires is out the window,” John Tripp, the county’s deputy fire chief, told the Associated Press.

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  • Bloody Leaves from King Albert's Deadly Fall Are Authentic, DNA Shows
    LiveScience.com

    Bloody Leaves from King Albert's Deadly Fall Are Authentic, DNA Shows

    Using DNA tests, scientists have confirmed the authenticity of a morbid souvenir: bloodstained leaves that were taken from the death site of Belgium's King Albert I more than 80 years ago. Albert, who ruled from 1909 until his death, was celebrated for his role in World War I, as he refused to let German troops through Belgium to attack France. An avid mountaineer, he died on Feb. 17, 1934, when he was climbing alone near the village of Marche-les-Dames, southeast of Brussels.

  • Associated Press

    Up there: Netherlands, Latvia lead world for people's height

    If you want to see a tall population of men, go to the Netherlands. National height averages are useful as an indicator of nutrition, health care, environment and general health that people have experienced from the womb through adolescence, said Majid Ezzati of Imperial College London, who led the research. The tallest men in the new analysis were Dutch, with an average height of about 6 feet (182.5 centimeters).

  • Newsmax

    'Brain Training' Cuts Dementia Risk by 48 Percent: Study

    A computerized brain training program cut the risk of dementia among healthy people by 48 percent, U.S. researchers said on Sunday in reporting an analysis of the results of a 10-year study. The preliminary findings, presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Toronto, are the first to show that any kind of intervention could delay the development of dementia in normal, healthy adults. To date, cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists have largely rejected evidence that computer-based cognitive-training software or "brain games" have any effect on cognitive function. The new findings would be quite promising if they hold up through peer review and publication in a scientific journal, said Dr. John King, an expert in social research at the National Institute of Aging.

  • Spacious Townhomes in a Golf Course Community

    Spacious Townhomes in a Golf Course Community

    The Beechtree luxury townhomes in Upper Marlboro, Maryland feature an unparalleled lifestyle and are an incredible value. Priced from the $360s.

  • Researchers just discovered the world’s deepest underwater sinkhole in the South China Sea
    Washington Post

    Researchers just discovered the world’s deepest underwater sinkhole in the South China Sea

    As local fishermen tell it, the deep blue “Dragon Hole” in the Xisha Islands, called the “eye” of the South China Sea, is where the Monkey King in Journey to the West acquired his famous golden cudgel. After nearly a year of exploration, Chinese researchers have determined that the underwater sinkhole is likely the world’s deepest, reaching about 987 feet below the surface and surpassing the previous record holder, Dean’s Blue Hole near the Bahamas, by more than 300 feet, Xinhua News Agency reported. Blue holes are named as such for their rich, dark blue coloring, a stark contrast to the otherwise aqua waters that surround them. Researchers with the Sansha Ship Course Research Institute for Coral Protection began exploring Dragon Hole, known as Longdong, in August 2015 and completed the project last month, Xinhua reported.

  • AFP

    African children to suffer as El Nino winds down: NGO

    Millions of children will suffer disproportionately from the failed harvests and devastated livelihoods left behind by the El Nino weather phenomenon, Save the Children warned Tuesday. El Nino affects rainfall patterns and causes both drought and flooding. As it recedes the Pacific cooling trend known as La Nina is set to begin.

  • LUCA, The Ancestor Of All Living Things
    IBTimes

    LUCA, The Ancestor Of All Living Things

    Hard as it may be to fathom, the immense diversity of life we see around us today — from the bacteria living in the garden soil to the majestic blue whale inhabiting the deep blue seas — all evolved from one single-celled ancestor that lived, and died, billions of years ago. In a paper published Monday in the journal Nature Microbiology, researchers have described, in unprecedented detail, this Last Universal Common Ancestor, or LUCA, which was only “half alive.” This ancestor — a single-cell, bacterium-like organism — is believed to have existed roughly four billion years ago, when Earth was just over 500 million years old. LUCA, the researchers say, was the common point of origin for three great domains of life — bacteria, archaea, which are bacteria-like single-cell prokaryotes, and the eukaryotes, a domain that includes all plants and animals.

  • Transform To Hybrid Infrastructure w/ HPE

    Transform To Hybrid Infrastructure w/ HPE

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  • 'Brain training' cut dementia risk in healthy adults, study finds
    Fox News

    'Brain training' cut dementia risk in healthy adults, study finds

    A computerized brain training program cut the risk of dementia among healthy people by 48 percent, U.S. researchers said on Sunday in reporting an analysis of the results of a 10-year study. The preliminary findings, presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Toronto, are the first to show that any kind of intervention could delay the development of dementia in normal, healthy adults. To date, cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists have largely rejected evidence that computer-based cognitive-training software or "brain games" have any effect on cognitive function. The new findings would be quite promising if they hold up through peer review and publication in a scientific journal, said Dr. John King, an expert in social research at the National Institute of Aging.

  • Associated Press

    Hollywood stars hold climate rally ahead of DNC

    More than 1,000 people joined Hollywood stars including Shailene Woodley, Susan Sarandon and Danny Glover in Philadelphia last night on the eve of the Democratic National Convention and vowed to keep fighting for climate and environmental justice issues, even though their preferred presidential candidate would not be driving the party's agenda. Sarandon, who like the other stars in attendance campaigned on behalf of Sen. Bernie Sanders, said the rally's turnout was proof that theirs was a movement and not a cult of personality as some critics alleged.

  • Solar-powered Solar Impulse plane completes its trip around the world
    Mashable

    Solar-powered Solar Impulse plane completes its trip around the world

    Solar Impulse 2 — the experimental solar plane which first set out on its circumnavigation attempt in 2015 — has just landed in Abu Dhabi, its final landing spot and the city where its around-the-world bid began. Piccard and his fellow Solar Impulse pilot André Borschberg set out on this world tour to raise awareness about solar power and clean technology that could one day change the way we travel. Solar Impulse 2 is making use of energy efficient batteries and other technologies that could one day help make flight more fuel efficient and friendly for the environment.

  • "Shark Tank" Star Reveals #1 Mortgage Payoff Tip

    "Shark Tank" Star Reveals #1 Mortgage Payoff Tip

    If you're over 40 years old and you own a home, you need to read this. (It's not what you think!)

  • That's Insane! Daring Skydiver 'Surfs' on Storm Clouds
    LiveScience.com

    That's Insane! Daring Skydiver 'Surfs' on Storm Clouds

    Earlier this month, MacCormac, a member of the Red Bull Air Force's collection of skydivers and pilots, strapped a board to his feet and "surfed" down the edge of a storm cloud over central Florida. "It's one of those things that's so wrong," MacCormac told Live Science. What may be even more unreasonable is that this wasn't MacCormac's first jump into a thunderstorm.

  • Get Used To These Extreme Summer Heat Waves
    The Huffington Post

    Get Used To These Extreme Summer Heat Waves

    Sweltering heat waves like the ones plaguing the Midwest and Northeast in recent days will become typical summer weather if climate change continues its course, scientists warn.  Temperatures have been in the mid-to-high 90s across the northeast since Thursday, plaguing the New York tri-state area, Philadelphia, Boston, Washington, D.C. and beyond. They follow a heat wave that struck the Midwest late last week, slamming Chicago with temperatures in the high 90s that felt more like 105 degrees.  And this comes just a month after triple-digit temperatures scorched the Southwest, breaking temperature records across Arizona and killing four hikers. At this rate, some experts are already saying there’s

  • 3D-printing project makes building lab equipment as easy as snapping Legos together
    Digital Trends

    3D-printing project makes building lab equipment as easy as snapping Legos together

    Legos are one of the most versatile toys around because you can, with enough bricks and imagination, build anything you want. “[Right now,] if you want to do a lot of different things in science, you need a lot of different instruments,” William Grover, assistant pofessor of boengineering, tells Digital Trends. Researchers could use these blocks to build virtually any instrument they might need.

  • Security Camera Systems: Going Wireless

    Security Camera Systems: Going Wireless

    Security camera systems allow you to keep your family and property protected from criminal activity. See why many homeowners are making the switch.

  • Israel to display ancient mummy with modern-day afflictions
    Associated Press

    Israel to display ancient mummy with modern-day afflictions

    Israel's national museum is set to display a 2,200-year-old Egyptian mummy of a man who was afflicted with some modern-day illnesses such as osteoporosis and tooth decay, the museum said on Tuesday. The mummy is the only such relic in Israel, named the "Protective Eye of Horus," after a pharaonic deity. It was kept for decades at a Jesuit institute in Jerusalem before it was loaned to the Israel Museum.

  • Accesswire

    Thunder Energies Corporation Chief Scientist Honored at the University of La Rochelle, France

    TARPON SPRINGS, FL / ACCESSWIRE / July 25, 2016 / Thunder Energies Corporation (TNRG), announces that its Chief Scientist, Dr. R. M. Santilli, has been honored with a Technical Achievement Award by the University of La Rochelle, France, under co-sponsorship by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the International Federation of Non-Linear Analysis, the International Federation of Information Processing, the American Institute of Physics, and other institutions. Thunder Energies Corporation, a publicly traded company with OTC stock symbol TNRG, announces that its Chief Scientist, Dr. R. M. Santilli, has been honored with a Technical Achievement Award by the University of La Rochelle, France, under co-sponsorship by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the International Federation of Non-Linear Analysis, the International Federation of Information Processing, the American Institute of Physics, and other institutions.

  • Could CRISPR Gene Editing Change the Future of Ag?
    Civil Eats

    Could CRISPR Gene Editing Change the Future of Ag?

    Up until recently, a genetically modified organism was one that had its genetic materials engineered. Now, a new technology is completely blurring the line. It’s called gene editing, and it involves “turning off” or deleting genes from a plant’s genome, as opposed to moving genes from one species to another. Despite the fact that these major regulatory bodies have shown less inclination to scrutinize these crops, other questions remain. Will the plant breeders who shape our food embrace this technology as standard practice? And perhaps, more importantly, will consumers object if they do? Because the farmers who buy the seed to grow these crops will surely be taking note. Bringing CRISPR to Your

  • 2016 Dodge Trucks

    2016 Dodge Trucks

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  • Reuters

    'Brain training' cut dementia risk in healthy adults -U.S. study

    By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - A computerized brain training program cut the risk of dementia among healthy people by 48 percent, U.S. researchers said on Sunday in reporting an analysis of the results of a 10-year study. The preliminary findings, presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Toronto, are the first to show that any kind of intervention could delay the development of dementia in normal, healthy adults. To date, cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists have largely rejected evidence that computer-based cognitive-training software or "brain games" have any effect on cognitive function.

  • Want to Save the Whales? Start Studying Krill
    Wired

    Want to Save the Whales? Start Studying Krill

    Scientists aboard the NOAA research vessel Fulmar study the marine heath of the waters off San Francisco by sampling water and krill–humpback and blue whales' favorite meal.

  • Mexico finds water tunnel under Pakal tomb in Palenque
    Associated Press

    Mexico finds water tunnel under Pakal tomb in Palenque

    Archaeologists at the Mayan ruin site of Palenque said Monday they have discovered an underground water tunnel built under the Temple of Inscriptions, which houses the tomb of an ancient ruler named Pakal. Archaeologist Arnoldo Gonzalez said researchers believe the tomb and pyramid were purposely built atop a spring between AD 683 and 702. The tunnel led water from under the funeral chamber out into the broad esplanade in front of the temple, thus giving Pakal's spirit a path to the underworld.

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  • LiveScience.com

    Bartender, Beware: Squeezing Limes Can Cause 'Margarita Burn'

    Just ask Justin Fehntrich, who developed second-degree burns on his hand after spending a sunny afternoon squeezing limes for margaritas last month. The "margarita burn" phenomenon, known as phytophotodermatitis, occurs when a person gets a compound called psoralen on his or her skin, said Dr. Doris Day, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Once activated, it makes the skin "exquisitely sensitive" to light, she told Live Science.

  • Rare white whale 'Migaloo' sighted off Australia
    AFP

    Rare white whale 'Migaloo' sighted off Australia

    An extremely rare white humpback whale was Tuesday spotted off the Australian coast as he migrates towards warmer tropical waters to mate. The albino is widely believed to be Migaloo, the world's best-known all-white humpback who has built up a loyal following in Australia since first being sighted in 1991. Migaloo is an Aboriginal word meaning "whitefella".

  • Travel-ready ‘Gastronaut’ ice cream bars don’t melt, so you can take them anywhere
    Digital Trends

    Travel-ready ‘Gastronaut’ ice cream bars don’t melt, so you can take them anywhere

    Let’s face it: most of us don’t have the mental and physical toughness to be astronauts. But you know what we can do to be like our spacefaring heroes? Eat ice cream like they do. That’s the concept of 34-year-old Rob Collington, founder of Gastronaut

  • 57 Year Old Mom Gets A Jaw-Dropping Makeover

    57 Year Old Mom Gets A Jaw-Dropping Makeover

    Mom Gets A Jaw-Dropping Makeover, Husband Shocked - Was It Too Dramatic?

  • The Cheat Sheet

    7 Ways That 'Star Trek' Changed the World

    The idea that Star Trek has changed the world might sound as farfetched as some of the USS Enterprise’s spacefaring missions, but the truth is that the science fiction series has directly or indirectly impacted both our present and future. It seems like an absurd statement — when creator Gene Roddenberry was first kicking around the idea in 1964, he probably never imagined that Star Trek would still be around in 2016 with reboots in the pipeline. Here are seven ways that Star Trek changed the world. 1.

  • This da Vinci Doodle Holds a Secret
    Popular Mechanics

    This da Vinci Doodle Holds a Secret

    When Leonardo da Vinci was doodling, he was figuring out some of the fundamental laws of physics. In a new paper, Professor Ian M. Hutchings of the University of Cambridge argues that a sketch from da Vinci's journals shows that the Renaissance-era polymath was already working out his own ideas about the concepts of friction years earlier than previously thought. Hutchings argues that the sketches, which had previously been seen as inconsequential, were the first known place that da Vinci began to work out his theory of friction (or "tribology").

  • We talked to a Harvard geneticist who thinks this unlikely ingredient could end one of the longest-raging food wars once and for all
    Business Insider

    We talked to a Harvard geneticist who thinks this unlikely ingredient could end one of the longest-raging food wars once and for all

    The next genetically modified food you eat probably won't be a GMO. At least not in the conventional sense of the term, which means genetically modified organism. Harvard geneticist George Church thinks crops like these might be our best hope for ending the war against GMOs, which he and dozens of other experts call misguided, once and for all.