Science

  • ABC News

    SpaceX Chief Envisions 1,000 Passenger Ships Flying to Mars

    On a personal quest to settle Mars, SpaceX founder Elon Musk envisions 1,000 passenger ships flying en masse to the red planet well within the next century, "Battlestar Galactica" style. Musk outlined his zealous plan Tuesday to establish a self-sustaining city on Mars, complete with iron foundries and even pizzerias. He wants to make humans a multiplanetary species, and says the best way to do that is to colonize the red planet. "I think Earth will be a good place for a long time, but the probable lifespan of human civilization will be much greater if we're a multiplanetary species," he said. Musk, who also runs electric car maker Tesla Motors, received a wildly warm reception at the International

  • Pillar of Obama climate plan has its day in court
    AFP

    Pillar of Obama climate plan has its day in court

    The cornerstone of President Barack Obama's drive to fight global warming underwent close scrutiny Tuesday in a high-stakes day in court. The so-called Clean Power Plan, approved last year, sets state-by-state emissions targets for existing power plants and aims to reduce America's output of CO2 by nearly a third by 2030 as compared to 2005 levels. The court's action raised doubts about America's contribution to a historic accord to fight global warming, reached in December in Paris, and infuriated environmentalists around the world.

  • Meet the nuclear cattle of Fukushima
    CNN

    Meet the nuclear cattle of Fukushima

    Nuclear Cattle On March 11 2011, a 15-meter tsunami triggered by a 8.9-magnitude earthquake, disabled the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima, causing a nuclear accident. Residents within a 20 km radius of the facility were forced to evacuate their homes and leave behind their livelihoods and possessions. Before leaving, some farmers released their cows so they could roam free and survive in the nuclear fallout-affected area. 1,400, however, died from starvation, while the government euthanized 1,500 more. Since 2011, Matsubara has documented both the relationship six farmers have with their surviving herds as well as an ongoing study examining the effects radiation has on large

  • Inside the Apartment Where Garrett Phillips Was Found Dead
    ABC News Videos

    Inside the Apartment Where Garrett Phillips Was Found Dead

    Potsdam Police Chief Mark Murray takes us back to the scene of the crime to show Elizabeth Vargas how police think Garrett Phillips' killer escaped. Enter the apartment. Don't always. For Specter here the door was open is on responsive don't show floor

  • A baby with 3 biological parents was born using a new technique — here's what that means
    Business Insider

    A baby with 3 biological parents was born using a new technique — here's what that means

    A baby containing the DNA from three different people was born, New Scientist reports. Three-parent in-vitro fertilization (IVF) was approved in the UK back in 2015, but the team from the New Hope Fertility Center in New York performed the procedure in Mexico. The idea is to substitute that faulty mitochondrial DNA in a mother's egg with a third set of DNA from a donor's egg to avoid these inherited conditions.

  • Asia's poor choking on filthy air
    AFP

    Asia's poor choking on filthy air

    Polluted air is a "public health emergency", the World Health Organization said Tuesday, adding nine out of 10 people globally breathe bad air that is blamed for more than six million deaths a year. Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific region -- including China -- are the hardest hit, the data showed. South Asia is also badly affected, with the WHO saying poor air quality is responsible for the deaths of more than 600,000 people in India and 37,000 people in Bangladesh every year.

  • Materials programmed to shape shift
    BBC News

    Materials programmed to shape shift

    Scientists have pre-programmed materials to change their shape over time. Previous shape-shifting materials have needed some external trigger to tell them to transform, like light or heat. Now, a US-based team has encoded a sequence of shape transformations into the very substance of a polymer, with each change occurring at a pre-determined time. Details appear in Nature Communications journal. The principles could be applied in implants that deliver medicine from within the human body and the technology could also see use in heavy industry. Professor Sergei Sheiko from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues introduced two types of chemical bond to their polymer: permanent

  • One of the original 'power posing' researchers now says its effects aren't real
    Business Insider

    One of the original 'power posing' researchers now says its effects aren't real

    Authored by Dana Carney and Andy Yap, then of Columbia University, as well as Amy Cuddy of Harvard, the study suggested that standing like Wonder Woman for two minutes could raise testosterone levels and reduce stress hormone levels temporarily. Cuddy gave a TED talk on power posing in 2012 that has been viewed 46 million times, and she's built a lucrative business based partly on the research that power posing works. Dana Carney, who today serves as a professor at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, recently published a report renouncing the effects of power posing.

  • SpaceX Unveils Plan for Manned Mars Mission
    Good Morning America

    SpaceX Unveils Plan for Manned Mars Mission

    Humans could set foot on Mars within the next 10 years -- at least if SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has his way. Building such a complex system will cost a lot of money -- so much that Musk hasn’t yet named a dollar figure.

  • Fox News Latino

    Evolution of large dinosaurs linked to development of bony cranial ornaments

    London –  The evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs such as "Tyrannosaurus rex" was linked to the development of exaggerated cranial ornaments such as crests and horns, a study published Tuesday said. Researchers from the University of North Carolina concluded in a study published in "Nature Communications" magazine that non-avian theropod species possessing ornaments developed larger body sizes than unadorned lineages. Phyletic giantism _ an evolutionary trend toward large size _ can thus be linked to the possession of cranial ornamentation, the study said. The paper found a clear correlation between the evolution of large-sized bodies and the appearance of osseous ornaments, whose "origin and influence across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals," according to the study.

  • A Rare Black Moon Will Rise In the Sky on Friday Night
    Country Living

    A Rare Black Moon Will Rise In the Sky on Friday Night

    When it comes to rare lunar events, September 2016 seems to be the month that keeps on giving: This Friday, September 30, a Black Moon will rise in the skies of the Western Hemisphere, a phenomenon we haven't seen since March 2014. The Black Moon, which will occur at 8:11 p.m. ET on Friday, will only be happening in the Western Hemisphere because, technically, the new moon will happen on October 1 for the Eastern Hemisphere (they'll be getting their Black Moon at the end of next month). The next time we'll see a second new moon in a single calendar month in the Americas will be July 2019.

  • As drought grips Iran, farmers lament loss of a way of life
    Los Angeles Times

    As drought grips Iran, farmers lament loss of a way of life

    Watermelons once sprung from this soil, the giant striped fruit dotting the arid landscape like mushrooms after a rain. “It was such a garden,” farmer Hossain Mirakhouri, 45, recalled of his childhood on this sun-scorched plateau east of Tehran. Now nothing remains of his family’s patch of watermelon, a water-hungry crop that Mirakhouri can no longer afford to grow in increasingly dry conditions. He and his brothers, who farm a 2-acre homestead by hand much as their ancestors did, have switched to growing barley and genetically modified cotton, which they say have lower water requirements.  “The amount of land that is cultivable shrinks year in, year out,” said Mirakhouri, sweat beading on his

  • Barrons

    Amgen: The Blame Game

    This morning, Amgen (AMGN) reported that its cancer drug Kyprolis failed to do what it hoped it would in a late-stage trial. RBC’s Michael Yee and Judy Liu wonder if the design of the trial was to blame: Amgen announced the Clarion study (head to head versus Velcade) did not meet stat sig for progression free survival although survival did show a solid trend (Hr=1.21). This is a surprise since the prior Endeavor second line study was a very big success and today’s result in first line may be due to lack of sufficient powering in our view, given strong trend in survival and deeper responses with Kyprolis should better especially earlier. Furthermore, all 3 key-opinion leaders Amgen hosted emphasized

  • Dead whales beached in Chile, climate change suspected
    AFP

    Dead whales beached in Chile, climate change suspected

    Several huge whales have washed up dead over recent months on beaches in northern Chile, where scientists suspect they are moving in increasing numbers due to climate change. After the beaching of hundreds of dead whales in the south last year, the trend has now shifted to areas where the phenomenon was previously rare. "We have detected a rise in recorded cases of beached whales on the coast, which is not normal," Sernapesca biologist Gerardo Cerda told AFP on Wednesday.

  • Ethics isn’t just for philosophers—designers need to take responsibility, too
    Quartz

    Ethics isn’t just for philosophers—designers need to take responsibility, too

    A few years ago, I was doing PhD research and interviewing designers around the world to identify the limiting factors in designers integrating sustainability into their work. Nearly everyone I interviewed had, at some point, learned about the systemic implications of rapid innovation and how to make better decisions. Yet most of them still passed off the responsibility of making the “right” decision to someone else: It was the boss’s, client’s, manufacturer’s, government’s, or consumer’s choice that would solve the problem that their production would participate in. When everyone within a system plays this hands-off, “that’s not my problem” game, the system is very quickly riddled with external

  • ZDNet

    MIT, Google have just dreamt up the drop-down meeting cubicle

    Once all the rage, the open-plan office appears to have fallen out of favor in recent times, with studies showing they contribute to a higher number of sick days and decreased productivity due to constant disruptions. According to a Bloomberg report last year, staff at some open-plan offices have resorted to using red and green cups to signal whether they can or cannot be disturbed. On the other hand, the open-office concept has been zealously embraced in Silicon Valley to support greater collaboration, which can boost productivity as long as the endless interruptions don't have the opposite effect. With this goal in mind, MIT's Self-Assembly Lab, in partnership with Google, has come up with

  • Let's fill a toilet with 240 pounds of mercury and then flush it
    CNET

    Let's fill a toilet with 240 pounds of mercury and then flush it

    Mercury, both beautiful and potentially dangerous, is a heavy metal that's liquid at normal ambient temperatures. It can be poisonous and should be treated with care. So what do you do with several large flasks of the shimmery stuff? You flush it down a toilet, of course. YouTube channel Cody's Lab filmed that exact experiment for us all to watch with wonder. Related stories Flush a functional solid-gold toilet at the Guggenheim Museum Iron Throne toilet lets you rule the bathroom The Cody's Lab video, posted on Tuesday, kicks off by discussing just how hard it is to flush a dense lead bullet down a toilet. You need a super-sucker of a loo to get the job done. The bullet test prompted Cody to

  • Elon Musk: Is his Mars Shot impossible or inspired?
    Mashable

    Elon Musk: Is his Mars Shot impossible or inspired?

    As early as 2024, a group of Mars-bound interplanetary SpaceX astronauts will board a gigantic SpaceX spacecraft likely named “Heart of Gold” to rocket off to Mars, a place from which they may or may not ever return. At one point, Musk casually noted that to succeed, they have to figure out how to reduce the cost of each trip by 5 million percent. During the Q&A portion of the Mars announcement, one woman asked if she could come up on stage and kiss Musk.

  • Ehud Barak backs startup Reporty, touts emergency tech
    FOX News Videos

    Ehud Barak backs startup Reporty, touts emergency tech

    Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak tells Foxnews.coms James Rogers that startup Reporty Homeland Security will transform emergency systems

  • Everything You Need To Know About Friday's Rare Black Moon
    Refinery29

    Everything You Need To Know About Friday's Rare Black Moon

    For the second time this month, earthlings of the Western Hemisphere will experience a special event involving our moon. Earlier this month, we got our full moon — the Harvest Moon. And this Friday, on the final day of September, a Black Moon will appear in the sky for the first time since March 2014. Though the name sounds ominous, according to Space.com, the term Black Moon simply refers to the rare occurrence of two new moons in a single month. Basically, a Black Moon is the exact opposite of a Blue Moon, the term used when you get two full moons in one month. The new moon is the first phase in the lunar cycle and is nearly impossible to see. Space.com explains that the moon is hard to spot

  • 2017 Land Rover Discovery Release Date, Price and Specs
    CNET

    2017 Land Rover Discovery Release Date, Price and Specs

    "Discovery" is one of the auto industry's all-time great names, a moniker incredibly well-suited to an SUV with a history of providing legitimatelegendary off-road chops. So it was quite a surprise when Land Rover walked away from the appellation in the mid-2000s in favor of an alphanumeric soup -- LR3 and then LR4, model names that that sounded they belonged to a line of icemakers. Well, the rebranding experts have evidently been put out to pasture in Great Britain, because Land Rover has finally, mercifully restored the Discovery nameplate for this fifth-generation model. And it's not just the name that's new, the Green Oval has reworked the seven-seat SUV from stem to stern for its Paris Motor

  • Overpopulation in Dhaka 'will see groundwater contaminated with arsenic within next decade'
    International Business Times UK

    Overpopulation in Dhaka 'will see groundwater contaminated with arsenic within next decade'

    Deep groundwater near megacities may become contaminated within 10 years, scientists have warned. Using the example of Dhaka, in Bangladesh, they show that over-pumping water in cities affects regional ground resources in the region. Around 15 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the most populated cities in the world. Population density is also one of the highest in the world, with roughly 115,000 people per square mile. Accommodating the needs of such a vast number of inhabitants means there are often enormous strains on the environment. Water resources are a prime example of this. Like many of the world's megacities, Dhaka is reliant on groundwater from aquifers – permeable rocks

  • 14,000-year-old campsite in Argentina adds to an archaeological mystery
    Ars Technica

    14,000-year-old campsite in Argentina adds to an archaeological mystery

    For more than a decade, evidence has been piling up that humans colonized the Americas thousands of years before the Clovis people. The Clovis, who are the early ancestors of today's Native Americans, left abundant evidence of their lives behind in the form of tools and graves. But the mysterious pre-Clovis humans, who likely arrived 17,000 to 15,000 years ago, have left only a few dozen sources of evidence for their existence across the Americas, mostly at campsites where they processed animals during hunting trips. Now a fresh examination of one such campsite, a 14,000-year-old hunter's rest stop outside the city of Tres Arroyos in Argentina, has given us a new understanding of how the pre-Clovis

  • Taking the environmental bite out of salmon farming
    AFP

    Taking the environmental bite out of salmon farming

    In a peaceful bay off Norway's Hitra island, massive nets teem with salmon destined for dinner tables worldwide -- an export boon for the Nordic nation that comes with a long list of environmental side-effects.

  • Quartz has tested Google’s new AI-powered translator, and it needs to learn more Chinese
    Quartz

    Quartz has tested Google’s new AI-powered translator, and it needs to learn more Chinese

    Google has recently overhauled Google Translate. The new AI-powered translator, “Google Machine Neural Translation,” can cut down errors by 80% compared to its current algorithm, making it nearly identical to human translators, the company said this week. The new method is currently only available for English to Mandarin and vice-versa, but judging from the examples Google gave, it appears to be doing great at translating standard journalistic writing. Here at Quartz, where language is an obsession, we decided to take matters into our own hands. As we did with Skype’s instant translator, we put Google’s new translator through a realistic Chinese stress test. The highest score available is five