Science

  • ABC News

    Warmer Waters Might Prevent Baby Lobsters From Surviving

    Baby lobsters might not be able to survive in the ocean's waters if the ocean continues to warm at the expected rate. That is the key finding of a study performed by scientists in Maine, the state most closely associated with lobster in the U.S. The scientists found that lobster larvae struggled to survive when they were reared in water 5 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the current temperatures typical of the western Gulf of Maine. That's how much the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change expects the Gulf of Maine to warm by the year 2100. The paper appears this month in the scientific journal ICES (ICE-ees) Journal of Marine Science. Scientists at the University of Maine Darling

  • In appeal to millennials, pro-Clinton group hits Gary Johnson on climate
    Mashable

    In appeal to millennials, pro-Clinton group hits Gary Johnson on climate

    In a new digital ad released Friday, a group trying to marshall millennials' support for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton criticizes Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson for his views on global climate change.  The ad is noteworthy

  • TakePart.com

    Justice Department Says No Thanks to Forensic Science Report

    Common crime lab techniques made famous by shows like Law & Order have come under fire yet again—this time by President Obama’s top scientific advisers. A damning report released this week by the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology calls into question the scientific basis of the forensic analysis of bite marks, mixed DNA samples, hair samples, and footwear, among other techniques. In spite of the esteemed origin of the report, Attorney General Loretta Lynch said the Justice Department wouldn’t heed the findings.

  • Mark Zuckerberg Made Us All Friends—Now Can He Rid the World of Disease?
    Town & Country

    Mark Zuckerberg Made Us All Friends—Now Can He Rid the World of Disease?

    Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, want to rid the world of all disease by the end of this century-and they're pledging $3 billion of their fortune to the ambitious goal. Over the next 10 years, the Facebook CEO and his pediatrician wife will donate about six percent of their net worth of $55.2 billion toward advancing scientific research to "cure, prevent or manage all disease" in the next 80 years, the couple announced yesterday at an event in San Francisco for the Chan Zuckerberg initiative. At current rates of progress, Zuckerberg reckons, it will be possible to solve most of these problems "by the end of this century." Zuckerberg and Chan have spent the past two years speaking to scientists and other experts to plan the endeavor.

  • 'Man-goat' among winners of spoof Nobel prizes
    AFP

    'Man-goat' among winners of spoof Nobel prizes

    A man who lived as a goat in the Swiss Alps and a scientist who studied how pants affect the sex drive of rodents are among the winners of this year's spoof Nobel prizes. The 26th edition of the annual Ig Nobel Prizes, which celebrate the silly side of science, were handed out Thursday at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The top honor in the reproduction category went to the late Ahmed Shafik from Cairo University, who died in 2007, for his work that showed how the sex lives of rats are affected by the fabric of pants they are fitted with.

  • MH370 wreckage hunter won't give up until mystery solved
    Washington Post

    MH370 wreckage hunter won't give up until mystery solved

    CANBERRA, Australia — The fedora, the bomber jacket and the consuming quest invite comparisons to Indiana Jones. Blaine Gibson, though, hasn’t matched the film hero’s triumph in finding the legendary chest containing the stone tablets inscribed with the Ten Commandments. Not that he didn’t try. “The Ark of the Covenant, I did not find it. However, I do believe that it’s in Ethiopia somewhere,” Gibson told AP recently. The amateur sleuth has had far greater success finding clues from a modern mystery: the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. He is the first person searching for the plane who’s actually found any trace of it and says he won’t quit gathering clues until the mystery is

  • ABC News

    SpaceX: Accident Points to Breach in Rocket's Helium System

    SpaceX said Friday that evidence points to a large breach in the rocket's helium system during a routine prelaunch test that turned into a devastating fireball three weeks ago. The Falcon rocket and a satellite were destroyed in the Sept. 1 explosion, which occurred on the pad two days before the scheduled liftoff. Most of the wreckage has been recovered and is being analyzed. In an update Friday, SpaceX said it's still poring through video, audio and data from the moment the first sign of a problem occurs, until the actual fireball. That timeline covers less than one-tenth of one second. The data and debris indicate "a large breach" in the helium system of the second-stage liquid oxygen tank.

  • LiveScience.com

    Eggo Waffle Recall: How To Find Listeria

    Kellogg announced on Monday that it is recalling approximately 10,000 cases of Eggo Nutri-Grain Whole Wheat Waffles due to possible contamination with the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. There are several ways that bacteria such as Listeria can get into food products, said Benjamin Chapman, a food safety specialist and an associate professor at North Carolina State University. One way is if the bacteria make their way into the food-processing plant, Chapman said.

  • Police Remain Confident They Will Find Faith Hedgepeth's Killer: Part 6
    ABC News Videos

    Police Remain Confident They Will Find Faith Hedgepeth's Killer: Part 6

    Each year, Faith Hedgepeth's family holds a fundraiser and gives away two scholarships in her memory.

  • MH370 wreckage hunter won't give up until mystery solved
    Associated Press

    MH370 wreckage hunter won't give up until mystery solved

    Blaine Gibson, though, hasn't matched the film hero's triumph in finding the legendary chest containing the stone tablets inscribed with the Ten Commandments. The amateur sleuth has had far greater success finding clues from a modern mystery: the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. "Travel is what I do, but I always love travel with a purpose, and solving the mystery of Malaysia 370 is a purpose ... until I or someone else finds out what happened to the plane and those on board," he said while in the Australian capital of Canberra to visit the headquarters for the official plane search.

  • Correction: Tangled Whales-Crabbing story
    Associated Press

    Correction: Tangled Whales-Crabbing story

    In a story Sept. 23 about a bill to protect whales from fishing gear for Dungeness crab, The Associated Press erroneously reported the name of an environmental group that backed the legislation. The group is the Center for Biological Diversity, not the Center for Environmental Diversity.

  • Man becomes goat for 3 days, wins award
    Mashable

    Man becomes goat for 3 days, wins award

    LONDON — Remember that guy that decided being a human is overrated and created special prostheses that allowed him to live among mountain goats in the Alps for three days?  Absolute legend, right? Well, this hero is finally receiving the acclaim that

  • The Atlantic

    How a Garbage Fire Could Lead to New Antibiotics

    The fire under Centralia has been burning since 1962. That spring, a dump in the Pennsylvania mining town caught on fire. The dump was in a strip mine, which led to an underground mine, which led to a coal seam under the town. Fire met fuel, miles and

  • Germany sees 'turning point' in birth rate decline
    AFP

    Germany sees 'turning point' in birth rate decline

    Germany has halted a three-decade-long decline in its birth rate, with data showing that the trend has started to reverse, statisticians said Friday. Over the last 35 years Europe's biggest economy had recorded a steady fall in birth rate, which reached a low of 1.49 child for each woman born in the year 1968, said the Federal Institute for Population Research. "The decline in birth rate has stopped," said Martin Bujard, a researcher at the institute.

  • Dna Analysis Points To Humanity's Oldest Civilization
    Fox News

    Dna Analysis Points To Humanity's Oldest Civilization

    New research suggests that the title of world's oldest civilization goes to the indigenous populations of Australia and Papua New Guinea. Scientists say the DNA of these people can be traced back to an original wave of settlers from Africa more than 50,000 years ago, reports the Guardian. “They are probably the oldest group in the world that you can link to one particular place,” says the University of Copenhagen's Eske Willerslev, lead author of a new study in Nature. It finds that the ancestors of these indigenous populations arrived on Sahul—a supercontinent that once included New Guinea, Australia, and Tasmania, per the Telegraph—between 51,000 and 72,000 years ago. In fact, the study suggests

  • Bloomberg

    Elon Musk to Make Us a Multiplanetary Species (If He Can)

    When Elon Musk takes the stage of the 67th International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico on Sept. 27, it won’t be to rehash terrestrial concerns like a fatal Tesla autopilot crash or a poorly received merger proposal. Musk’s keynote address, entitled “Making Humans a Multiplanetary Species,” will tackle the technical challenges and “potential architectures for colonizing the Red Planet," according to organizers. No one has been anticipating the event more eagerly than Musk, who founded Space Exploration Technologies Corp., his rocket-launch company, 14 years ago with the express goal of putting humans on other planets to live and work.

  • LiveScience.com

    Associating Colors with Letters: Clues to Synesthesia

    People with an unusual condition called synesthesia, which makes them experience a "mixing" of their senses, may automatically form stronger mental links between the sound of a word and the image that word conjures up in their mind, according to a small new study. For example, a person with synesthesia might always perceive the letter "Y" as blue or yellow, even when that individual sees it in black print. "There's been a debate about synesthesia," study co-author Dr. Krish Sathian, a neurologist at Emory University, said in a statement.

  • Apparently we have more than 5 senses — THREE more, according to science
    Hello Giggles

    Apparently we have more than 5 senses — THREE more, according to science

    Apparently we have more than 5 senses — THREE more, according to science Growing up, we all learned that our wonderfully complicated human selves are equipped with the ability to hear, smell, taste, feel and touch.

  • China Claims It Developed "Quantum" Radar To See Stealth Planes
    Popular Mechanics

    China Claims It Developed "Quantum" Radar To See Stealth Planes

    Beijing's state media has made the bold claim that a Chinese defense contractor successfully developed the world's first quantum radar system. Quantum radar is based on the theory of quantum entanglement and the idea that two different particles can share a relationship with one another to the point that, by studying one particle, you can learn things about the other particle-which could be miles away. In quantum radars, a photon is split by a crystal into two entangled photons, a process known as "parametric down-conversion." The radar splits multiple photons into entangled pairs-and A and a B, so to speak.

  • Laos failing to curb illegal wildlife trade: monitor
    AFP

    Laos failing to curb illegal wildlife trade: monitor

    The illegal trade in pangolins, helmeted hornbills and other wildlife products is thriving in Laos, a monitoring group said Friday, urging the Southeast Asian nation to crack down on a lucrative commerce largely fuelled by demand in neighbouring China. The authoritarian country has long been top transit hub for the smuggling of wildlife products, with widespread corruption and weak law enforcement allowing the criminal activity to flourish. Wildlife trade monitoring group TRAFFIC said Friday that endangered species such as pangolins and helmeted hornbills were being openly sold in Laos and that law enforcement against the illegal trade remained threadbare.

  • Connecticut becoming a hub for new bioscience companies
    Associated Press

    Connecticut becoming a hub for new bioscience companies

    Connecticut hasn't become the Silicon Valley of bioscience quite yet, but five years after lawmakers made a massive investment to support the development of that industry, there is a thriving hub in Farmington. The labs are being leased to the companies as part of the university's Technology Incubation Program, which is designed to help bioscience and tech companies start and grow in Connecticut.

  • Edward Lofgren, physicist who developed a particle accelerator, dies at 102
    Washington Post

    Edward Lofgren, physicist who developed a particle accelerator, dies at 102

    Edward Lofgren, a physicist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who helped build a key tool for studying the universe and played a role in the project that created the first atomic bomb, died Sept. 6 in Oakland, Calif. He was 102. Lab spokesman Glenn Roberts Jr. confirmed the death but did not provide the cause. Dr. Lofgren led the development, construction and operation of the Bevatron, an early particle accelerator at the lab. A giant machine that smashes atoms, it was used to find the antiproton, a discovery which led to a Nobel Prize. This research helped scientists study how today’s universe was created and grew. Before his retirement in 1979, he also served as associate laboratory

  • North Korea's New Rocket Engine Could Loft Satellites — Or Missiles
    SPACE.com

    North Korea's New Rocket Engine Could Loft Satellites — Or Missiles

    North Korea's new rocket engine might help the country launch satellites to higher orbits, as the rogue nation claims — but the technology could also help North Korea's (possibly nuclear-armed) missiles fly farther, researchers said. On Tuesday (Sept. 20), North Korea's state news agency reported a ground test "of a new type of high-power engine of a carrier rocket for the geostationary satellite." Geostationary satellites are located in circular orbits about 22,200 miles (35,8000 kilometers) above Earth's equator, and are often used for communications, weather and surveillance applications. However, many observers outside North Korea see its space program as a way to develop technologies for

  • Get your Sagan on with these 23 awe-inspiring photos of the final frontier
    Digital Trends

    Get your Sagan on with these 23 awe-inspiring photos of the final frontier

    From the early, grainy images of the Martian surface taken by Mariner 4 to humanity’s first up-close look at Charon, photographs of our celestial neighbors and those lightyears away have long-since filled us with a since of wonder. Related: Space Standoff

  • MarketWatch

    Life on Jupiter’s moon? NASA talks about it live on Monday

    NASA will hold a live teleconference Monday afternoon to unveil what agency officials call “surprising activity” on Jupiter’s icy moon Europa. The teleconference, announcing the discoveries by the agency’s Hubble Space Telescope, will be streamed live by NASA beginning at 2 p.m. Eastern time. The moon’s activity, even the possibility of some life form, could be tied to what many experts believe is Europa’s subsurface ocean, according to past NASA releases. NASA’s $1.1 billion Juno spacecraft successfully slipped into orbit around the planet in July on a 20-month mission to learn more about how the gas giant formed, and to probe the origins of the solar system. NASA announced last year that it