Science

  • LiveScience.com

    Goodbye, Weasels! New Zealand to Wipe Out Its Invasive Predators

    The clock is ticking for the rats, possums and weasels that have invaded New Zealand over the past few hundred years. Before humans landed in New Zealand less than 800 years ago, precious few mammals lived on the islands — a vibrant archipelago that provided a home for flightless birds, such as the kiwi, takahe­ and kakapo parrot, as well as geckos and lizard-like tuataras. "While once the greatest threat to our native wildlife was poaching and deforestation, it is now introduced predators," Key said in a statement.

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  • 'Brain training' cut dementia risk in healthy adults, study finds
    Fox News

    'Brain training' cut dementia risk in healthy adults, study finds

    A computerized brain training program cut the risk of dementia among healthy people by 48 percent, U.S. researchers said on Sunday in reporting an analysis of the results of a 10-year study. The preliminary findings, presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Toronto, are the first to show that any kind of intervention could delay the development of dementia in normal, healthy adults. To date, cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists have largely rejected evidence that computer-based cognitive-training software or "brain games" have any effect on cognitive function. The new findings would be quite promising if they hold up through peer review and publication in a scientific journal, said Dr. John King, an expert in social research at the National Institute of Aging.

  • Associated Press

    Up there: Netherlands, Latvia lead world for people's height

    If you want to see a tall population of men, go to the Netherlands. National height averages are useful as an indicator of nutrition, health care, environment and general health that people have experienced from the womb through adolescence, said Majid Ezzati of Imperial College London, who led the research. The tallest men in the new analysis were Dutch, with an average height of about 6 feet (182.5 centimeters).

  • Archaeologists Discover Water Tunnel Under Ancient Mayan Site of Palenque in Mexico
    Time

    Archaeologists Discover Water Tunnel Under Ancient Mayan Site of Palenque in Mexico

    Archaeologist Arnoldo Gonzalez said researchers believe the tomb and pyramid were purposely built atop a spring between AD 683 and 702. Attention has focused on the heavily carved stone sarcophagus in which Pakal was buried, and which some erroneously believe depict the Maya ruler seated at the controls of a spaceship. The director of archaeology for the National Institute of Anthropology and History, Pedro Sanchez Nava, said the theory makes sense in light of other pre-Hispanic peoples, such as those who lived at Teotihuacan, near Mexico City, where another water tunnel was found.

  • Coming Soon: A Commuter’s Dream in Manassas, VA

    Coming Soon: A Commuter’s Dream in Manassas, VA

    Bradley Square will offer luxury garage townhomes from the mid $300s on wooded homesites less than 2 miles from the VRE, Route 234, shopping & dining.

  • Was this ancient organism the first life on Earth, or just the luckiest?
    Washington Post

    Was this ancient organism the first life on Earth, or just the luckiest?

    It was Charles Darwin who first guessed at the mysterious creature that gave rise to all life as we know it. "Probably all the organic beings which have ever lived on this Earth have descended from some primordial form, into which life was first breathed," he wrote in "On the Origin of Species" in 1859. But that primordial form lived and died 4 billion years ago. Its traits — where it lived, what it ate, how it survived the brutal conditions on early Earth — are obscured by time and a scant fossil record. So researchers have tried to learn about the Last Universal Common Ancestor, or LUCA, by looking at its legacy: every creature alive on Earth today. In a study published Monday in the journal

  • Bloody Leaves from King Albert's Deadly Fall Are Authentic, DNA Shows
    LiveScience.com

    Bloody Leaves from King Albert's Deadly Fall Are Authentic, DNA Shows

    Using DNA tests, scientists have confirmed the authenticity of a morbid souvenir: bloodstained leaves that were taken from the death site of Belgium's King Albert I more than 80 years ago. Albert, who ruled from 1909 until his death, was celebrated for his role in World War I, as he refused to let German troops through Belgium to attack France. An avid mountaineer, he died on Feb. 17, 1934, when he was climbing alone near the village of Marche-les-Dames, southeast of Brussels.

  • Massive wildfire near Los Angeles kills one person, forces thousands to flee
    Mashable

    Massive wildfire near Los Angeles kills one person, forces thousands to flee

    What began as a brush fire last Friday rapidly morphed into a raging blaze over the weekend, burning more than 33,000 acres and destroying at least 18 homes in Los Angeles County. Only about 10 percent of the wildfire was contained by Sunday night, the Los Angeles County Fire Department reported. “All the experience we’ve had with fires is out the window,” John Tripp, the county’s deputy fire chief, told the Associated Press.

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  • Americans worry about 'super-human' technologies: poll
    AFP Relax News

    Americans worry about 'super-human' technologies: poll

    Futuristic technologies that promise to improve people's strength and smarts by editing genes, implanting brain chips or super-charging blood have raised more concern than enthusiasm among Americans, a poll showed on Tuesday. The survey by the Pew Research Center included more than 4,700 US adults, and is considered a nationally representative sample. The prospect of brain implants that could increase intelligence and focus also raised concern for 69 percent of people, as did the potential of synthetic blood that could improve speed, strength and stamina (63 percent).

  • ABC News

    Ice Bucket Challenge funds contribute to discovery of gene linked to ALS

    The Ice Bucket Challenge is being credited with helping to raise significant funds that have allowed researchers to identify a gene found to be one of the most common in people with the deadly disease that affects neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The Challenge became a sensation two summers ago and involved participants, including many athletes and celebrities, pouring ice water over their heads to help raise awareness of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The effort raised more than $100 million in contributions for the ALS Association, which contributed $1 million to the Project MinE research project. "The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge enabled us to secure funding from new sources in new parts of the world," said Bernard Muller, an entrepreneur who suffers from the progressive disease and helped start the research project.

  • Solar plane nears end of historic round-the-world trip
    AFP

    Solar plane nears end of historic round-the-world trip

    Solar Impulse 2 on Monday neared the end of its epic journey to become the first sun-powered airplane to circle the globe without a drop of fuel to promote renewable energy. When the experimental aircraft touches down in Abu Dhabi it will cap a remarkable 42,000-kilometre (26,097 mile) journey across four continents, two oceans and three seas. Solar Impulse 2 was expected to enter UAE airspace at around 1:30 am local time on Tuesday (2130 GMT Monday), and land in Abu Dhabi at around 4:00 am (0000 GMT).

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  • Reuters

    Meter-wide dinosaur print, one of largest ever, found in Bolivia

    A footprint measuring over a meter wide that was made by a meat-eating predator some 80 million years ago has been discovered in Bolivia, one of the largest of its kind ever found. The print, which measures 1.2 meters (1.3 yards) across, probably belonged to the abelisaurus, a biped dinosaur that once roamed South America, said Argentine paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia, who is studying the find. The print was found some 64 kilometers (40 miles) outside the city of Sucre in central Bolivia by a tourist guide earlier this month.

  • Israel to display ancient mummy with modern-day afflictions
    Associated Press

    Israel to display ancient mummy with modern-day afflictions

    Israel's national museum is set to display a 2,200-year-old Egyptian mummy of a man who was afflicted with some modern-day illnesses such as osteoporosis and tooth decay, the museum said on Tuesday. The mummy is the only such relic in Israel, named the "Protective Eye of Horus," after a pharaonic deity. It was kept for decades at a Jesuit institute in Jerusalem before it was loaned to the Israel Museum.

  • Scientists say we’ll only get one year to prepare if a super-volcano erupts
    Business Insider

    Scientists say we’ll only get one year to prepare if a super-volcano erupts

    Super volcanic eruptions are so catastrophically powerful that they could devastate the entire planet. In a worst case scenario, these kinds of eruptions can eject 1000s of cubic kilometers of magma and ash in the matter of days or few months. That much ash in the atmosphere could block out the light and heat of the sun for years or decades. Unlike most volcanic eruptions, what makes super-eruptions different is that they are unable to erupt easily.

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  • Researchers just discovered the world’s deepest underwater sinkhole in the South China Sea
    Washington Post

    Researchers just discovered the world’s deepest underwater sinkhole in the South China Sea

    As local fishermen tell it, the deep blue “Dragon Hole” in the Xisha Islands, called the “eye” of the South China Sea, is where the Monkey King in Journey to the West acquired his famous golden cudgel. After nearly a year of exploration, Chinese researchers have determined that the underwater sinkhole is likely the world’s deepest, reaching about 987 feet below the surface and surpassing the previous record holder, Dean’s Blue Hole near the Bahamas, by more than 300 feet, Xinhua News Agency reported. Blue holes are named as such for their rich, dark blue coloring, a stark contrast to the otherwise aqua waters that surround them. Researchers with the Sansha Ship Course Research Institute for Coral Protection began exploring Dragon Hole, known as Longdong, in August 2015 and completed the project last month, Xinhua reported.

  • That's Insane! Daring Skydiver 'Surfs' on Storm Clouds
    LiveScience.com

    That's Insane! Daring Skydiver 'Surfs' on Storm Clouds

    Earlier this month, MacCormac, a member of the Red Bull Air Force's collection of skydivers and pilots, strapped a board to his feet and "surfed" down the edge of a storm cloud over central Florida. "It's one of those things that's so wrong," MacCormac told Live Science. What may be even more unreasonable is that this wasn't MacCormac's first jump into a thunderstorm.

  • Say farewell to the Philae comet lander using #GoodbyePhilae
    Mashable

    Say farewell to the Philae comet lander using #GoodbyePhilae

    On Wednesday, Europe's Philae lander will come to the official end of its long goodbye from the surface of its comet speeding toward the distant reaches of our solar system. The Rosetta orbiter — circling Comet 67P — will stop listening out for Philae on the comet's surface on Wednesday, when mission controllers turn off Rosetta's instrument designed to receive a signal if Philae attempts to phone home. "No signal has been received by Rosetta from Philae since last July and earlier this year the lander was considered to be in a state of eternal hibernation," the European Space Agency said in a blog post.

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  • 3D-printing project makes building lab equipment as easy as snapping Legos together
    Digital Trends

    3D-printing project makes building lab equipment as easy as snapping Legos together

    Legos are one of the most versatile toys around because you can, with enough bricks and imagination, build anything you want. “[Right now,] if you want to do a lot of different things in science, you need a lot of different instruments,” William Grover, assistant pofessor of boengineering, tells Digital Trends. Researchers could use these blocks to build virtually any instrument they might need.

  • Report: DNC hackers left evidence trail with ties to Moscow
    FOX News Videos

    Report: DNC hackers left evidence trail with ties to Moscow

    Catherine Herridge reports from Washington, D.C.

  • Spain calls in army as wildfire reaches nature reserve
    AFP

    Spain calls in army as wildfire reaches nature reserve

    Spanish troops intervened Tuesday as a wildfire near the eastern city of Valencia spread to a nature reserve after laying waste to some 1,400 hectares (3,500 acres) of land, regional authorities said.

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  • Who Invented Air Conditioning?
    Time

    Who Invented Air Conditioning?

    Carrier, who saw himself as the Thomas Edison of air conditioners, changed the world with his invention—but its original aims were much smaller than that. The air conditioner, built to both cool a room and reduce humidity, was originally created to keep moist air in a printing plant from wrinkling magazine pages. Research he produced for the company saved them $40,000 a year, and Carrier was put in charge of a new department of experimental engineering, where he designed his first air-conditioner for the printing plant.

  • Black-footed ferrets return to where they held out in wild
    Associated Press

    Black-footed ferrets return to where they held out in wild

    A nocturnal species of weasel with a robber-mask-like marking across its eyes has returned to the remote ranchlands of western Wyoming where the critter almost went extinct more than 30 years ago. Wildlife officials on Tuesday released 35 black-footed ferrets on two ranches near Meeteetse, a tiny cattle ranching community 50 miles east of Yellowstone National Park. Black-footed ferrets, generally solitary animals, were let loose individually over a wide area.

  • A Silicon Valley banker says this is the most surprising trend he's seen in healthcare
    Business Insider

    A Silicon Valley banker says this is the most surprising trend he's seen in healthcare

    The travails of Theranos — once a Silicon Valley favorite, now a poster child for what can go wrong with hot startups — have done nothing to slow investment in the healthcare sector. Early-stage funding for healthcare-focused startups is on pace to hit a record $2 billion in 2016, according to a recent report by Silicon Valley Bank. Solving big healthcare problems with technology is appealing to investors who already think of themselves as out to change the world.

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  • ‘We’ve primed the system': Why disgusting toxic blue-green algae blooms seem increasingly common
    Washington Post

    ‘We’ve primed the system': Why disgusting toxic blue-green algae blooms seem increasingly common

    It is the summer of algae. Across the United States, bodies of water teem with microscopic organisms, warmed by the sun and growing fat on stirred-up nutrients. Such microscopic explosions, called blooms, come at the expense of nearly everything else in the contaminated rivers and lakes. Their shores sport colors better suited to Gatorade factory rejects. What was once crystal or blue becomes scummy browns or dull reds — and, perhaps most significantly, a noxious snotty green. In places, the microbes are so numerous the water thickens to a soup. Nor is it a problem unique to the United States. An expanse of Australia’s longest river in the Murray-Darling Basin has gone green with increasing frequency.

  • Accesswire

    Thunder Energies Corporation Chief Scientist Honored at the University of La Rochelle, France

    TARPON SPRINGS, FL / ACCESSWIRE / July 25, 2016 / Thunder Energies Corporation (TNRG), announces that its Chief Scientist, Dr. R. M. Santilli, has been honored with a Technical Achievement Award by the University of La Rochelle, France, under co-sponsorship by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the International Federation of Non-Linear Analysis, the International Federation of Information Processing, the American Institute of Physics, and other institutions. Thunder Energies Corporation, a publicly traded company with OTC stock symbol TNRG, announces that its Chief Scientist, Dr. R. M. Santilli, has been honored with a Technical Achievement Award by the University of La Rochelle, France, under co-sponsorship by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the International Federation of Non-Linear Analysis, the International Federation of Information Processing, the American Institute of Physics, and other institutions.

  • New approaches to understanding Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease
    medicalxpress.com

    New approaches to understanding Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease

    In a study presented today at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2016, researchers at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute have explored how some people may develop the hallmarks of Alzheimer's or Parkinson's but never develop symptoms. Alzheimer's is typified by the build-up of amyloid protein in the brain, and Parkinson's disease by the loss of a key chemical messenger in the brain called dopamine. However, it's becoming clear that individuals can exhibit these changes but show no changes in their memory, thinking or day-to-day function. Using brain imaging data from large-scale studies into both diseases, the team identified regions of the brain associated with