Science

  • Elon Musk Expected to Detail SpaceX's Mars Ambitions
    ABC News

    Elon Musk Expected to Detail SpaceX's Mars Ambitions

    Speculation is rife that SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is about to detail plans to take humans to Mars within a decade. The space, car and tech mogul is scheduled to speak before the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico, today at 2:30 p.m. ET. Officially, Musk is slated to “discuss the long-term technical challenges that need to be solved to support the creation of a permanent, self-sustaining human presence on Mars,” in a keynote speech titled, “Making Humans a Multiplanetary Species.” “The technical presentation will focus on potential architectures for colonizing the Red Planet that industry, government and the scientific community can collaborate on in the years ahead,” a description

  • African elephants 'suffer worst decline in 25 years'
    AFP

    African elephants 'suffer worst decline in 25 years'

    The number of African elephants has dropped by around 111,000 in the past decade, a new report released Sunday at the Johannesburg conference on the wildlife trade said, blaming the plummeting figures on poaching. The revelation, the worst drop in 25 years, came amid disagreement on the second day of the global meet over the best way to improve the plight of Africa's elephants, targeted for their tusks. With Namibia and Zimbabwe, wanting to be allowed to sell ivory stockpiles accrued from natural deaths to fund community elephant conservation initiatives, Zimbabwe's Environment Minister Oppah Muchinguri rejected the "imperialistic policies" of opposing countries, branding them a "clear infringement on the sovereign rights of nations".

  • LiveScience.com

    In Shift, Most Americans Now Say President Should Release All Medical Records

    A majority of Americans now say that a U.S. president should release all of his or her medical information. The poll, which was conducted by Gallup last week, found that a slim majority of Americans, 51 percent, said that a president should release all medical information that might affect that person's ability to serve in office, whereas 46 percent said that a president should have the right to keep those medical records private. The new poll results are a change from the results in 2004, when just 38 percent of Americans said that a president should release all of his or her medical information, and 61 percent said that a president should be able to keep those records private, according to Gallup.

  • A baby with 3 biological parents was born using a new technique — here's what that means
    Business Insider

    A baby with 3 biological parents was born using a new technique — here's what that means

    A baby containing the DNA from three different people was born, New Scientist reports. Three-parent in-vitro fertilization (IVF) was approved in the UK back in 2015, but the team from the New Hope Fertility Center in New York performed the procedure in Mexico. The idea is to substitute that faulty mitochondrial DNA in a mother's egg with a third set of DNA from a donor's egg to avoid these inherited conditions.

  • Pillar of Obama climate plan has its day in court
    AFP

    Pillar of Obama climate plan has its day in court

    The cornerstone of President Barack Obama's drive to fight global warming underwent close scrutiny Tuesday in a high-stakes day in court. The so-called Clean Power Plan, approved last year, sets state-by-state emissions targets for existing power plants and aims to reduce America's output of CO2 by nearly a third by 2030 as compared to 2005 levels. The court's action raised doubts about America's contribution to a historic accord to fight global warming, reached in December in Paris, and infuriated environmentalists around the world.

  • NASA just saw Europa’s geysers erupting into space. Again.
    Washington Post

    NASA just saw Europa’s geysers erupting into space. Again.

    Look, we told you it wasn't going to be aliens. On Monday, after teasing about an announcement concerning "surprising activity" on Jupiter's moon Europa, NASA revealed new evidence for water geysers shooting from the ice-covered satellite. Surprising? Well, not really. This isn't the first time scientists have spotted what looks like geyser activity on the icy moon, which is thought to contain a subsurface ocean with more liquid water than all the seas on Earth combined. In 2012, the Hubble space telescope spotted water vapor above Europa's surface. Scientists determined the most likely culprit to be a plume of water vapor spurting out of Europa's south pole. The plume would have been big, shooting

  • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    WashU receives $23.6 million science grant to understand how single cells work

    ST. LOUIS • A joint effort between Washington University and the University of Pennsylvania received a $23.6 million federal grant to start a new Science and Technology Center. The partnership, fueled by the five-year grant, creates the Science and Technology Center for Engineering MechanoBiology. It's an effort to understand how single cells work, what they react to and how they can be used or developed to prevent diseases, boost crop practices and more. Single cell organisms are the root of all plants and animals. "Being named an STC is a prestigious distinction reserved for sweeping research projects that have the power to change lives. We're ready to get to work," Guy Genin, principal researcher

  • China’s Geely is new partner for Bloodhound land speed record team
    MotorAuthority

    China’s Geely is new partner for Bloodhound land speed record team

    The United Kingdom’s Bloodhound has secured vital funding from Chinese automaker Geely in order to complete its attempt on the world land speed record, scheduled to for South Africa in October 2017. Geely, which is the parent company to Volvo, has been named the prime sponsor of Bloodhound, as well as the team’s official automotive partner. The three-year deal will see Geely technology used in the construction of Bloodhound’s new SSC (supersonic car) as well as the company's logo on its flanks.

  • India to ratify Paris Agreement climate pact on Oct. 2
    Mashable

    India to ratify Paris Agreement climate pact on Oct. 2

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi said India will ratify the Paris Agreement climate change pact on Oct 2. Modi’s announcement on Sunday is seen as a major boost to the implementation of measures at international level in an attempt to control global warming. Modi added that the country has chosen Oct. 2 to coincide with the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, who lived his entire live with minimum carbon footprint.

  • A Rare Black Moon Will Rise In the Sky on Friday Night
    Country Living

    A Rare Black Moon Will Rise In the Sky on Friday Night

    When it comes to rare lunar events, September 2016 seems to be the month that keeps on giving: This Friday, September 30, a Black Moon will rise in the skies of the Western Hemisphere, a phenomenon we haven't seen since March 2014. The Black Moon, which will occur at 8:11 p.m. ET on Friday, will only be happening in the Western Hemisphere because, technically, the new moon will happen on October 1 for the Eastern Hemisphere (they'll be getting their Black Moon at the end of next month). The next time we'll see a second new moon in a single calendar month in the Americas will be July 2019.

  • Vietnam fishermen sue Taiwan firm over mass fish deaths
    AFP

    Vietnam fishermen sue Taiwan firm over mass fish deaths

    Hundreds of fishermen in central Vietnam have filed lawsuits demanding more compensation from a Taiwanese firm accused of dumping toxic waste in the ocean that killed tonnes of fish, activists said Tuesday. The mass fish deaths in April ravaged livelihoods in communities along the central coast, where fishing is the main source of income. In a rare case of civic action against big business in authoritarian Vietnam, large crowds of fishermen have swamped a courthouse in Ha Tinh province since Monday to file 506 lawsuits against Taiwanese conglomerate Formosa.

  • ABC News

    Mother Uncovers Lasting Impact of Son's Organ Donation

    An ultrasound showed one of Sarah Gray's unborn twins was missing part of his brain, a fatal birth defect. His brother was born healthy but Thomas lived just six days. Latching onto hope for something positive to come from heartache, Gray donated some of Thomas' tissue for scientific research — his eyes, his liver, his umbilical cord blood. Only no one could tell the Washington mother if that precious donation really made a difference. So Gray embarked on an unusual journey to find out, revealing a side of science that laymen seldom glimpse. "Infant eyes are like gold," a Harvard scientist told her. "I don't think people understand how valuable these donations are," said Gray, who hadn't grasped

  • One of the original 'power posing' researchers now says its effects aren't real
    Business Insider

    One of the original 'power posing' researchers now says its effects aren't real

    Authored by Dana Carney and Andy Yap, then of Columbia University, as well as Amy Cuddy of Harvard, the study suggested that standing like Wonder Woman for two minutes could raise testosterone levels and reduce stress hormone levels temporarily. Cuddy gave a TED talk on power posing in 2012 that has been viewed 46 million times, and she's built a lucrative business based partly on the research that power posing works. Dana Carney, who today serves as a professor at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, recently published a report renouncing the effects of power posing.

  • U-2 Spy Plane Crash: Why 'Cold War' Aircraft Are Still Relevant Today
    LiveScience.com

    U-2 Spy Plane Crash: Why 'Cold War' Aircraft Are Still Relevant Today

    A U-2 spy plane that crashed in northern California earlier this week, killing one of the two pilots, focused attention on a normally clandestine aspect of the U.S. military. The U-2 plane has a long and storied history that stretches back to the late 1950s, but how is the reconnaissance aircraft used today? U-2 planes have been flown by the United States and other nations for more than 60 years, as both a spy plane and an instrument of science.

  • Engadget

    Researchers think chaos theory can get us past Moore's Law

    Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, believed that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit would double every year or two. And, to his credit, that rule pretty much held out between 1965 and 2015, when the laws of physics began to get in the way. Now, researchers at North Carolina State believe that we don't need to obsess over ever-smaller transistors to make chips even more powerful. Instead, they've turned to chaos theory in the hope that mixing things up will provide the performance boost that Intel can't. Lead researcher Behnam Kia explains that we are now "reaching the limits of physics in terms of transistor size." If you've ever listened to one of Intel's presentations, you'll

  • In China, The World's Biggest Radio Telescope Is Now Complete
    Fox News

    In China, The World's Biggest Radio Telescope Is Now Complete

    The largest radio telescope in the world is getting ready to start listening to the cosmos now that it’s finished, the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) announced on Sunday. The mammoth telescope, located in the mountains of Guizhou, China, has an aperture that’s over 1,600 feet long, and the entire size of the instrument is the same as 30 soccer fields, according to CAS. At a cost of $180 million, and made up of 4,450 panels, the telescope will help scientists conduct astronomical research and will even listen for signs of extraterrestrial life. It’s called FAST, for Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope. Now the telescope will undergo a testing phase, CAS said.  “Once completed, FAST

  • Climate change may be irreversible
    Business Insider

    Climate change may be irreversible

    Current greenhouse gas concentrations could warm the world 3-7℃ (and on average 5℃) over coming millennia. That’s the finding of a paper published in Nature today. The research, by Carolyn Snyder, reconstructed temperatures over the past 2 million years. By investigating the link between carbon dioxide and temperature in the past, Snyder made new projections for the future. The Paris climate agreement seeks to limit warming to a “safe” level of well below 2℃ and aim for 1.5℃ by 2100. The new research shows that even if we stop emissions now, we’ll likely surpass this threshold in the long term, with major consequences for the planet. What is climate sensitivity? How much the planet will warm

  • Ehud Barak backs startup Reporty, touts emergency tech
    FOX News Videos

    Ehud Barak backs startup Reporty, touts emergency tech

    Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak tells Foxnews.coms James Rogers that startup Reporty Homeland Security will transform emergency systems

  • Why India's commercial space programme is thriving
    BBC News

    Why India's commercial space programme is thriving

    On Monday, India sent a rocket into space which successfully launched eight satellites in one go. The main purpose of the launch which took place at the Sriharikota space centre off India's eastern coast, was to put into orbit SCATSAT-1, a satellite that will help weather forecasting. Five of the other satellites that were on board are foreign, from the US, Canada and Algeria. In June India launched 20 satellites in a single mission, the most in the history of the country's ambitious space programme. Seventeen of those were foreign. Monday's launch takes the number of foreign satellites launched by India to 79. This has earned the country more than $120m (£92m). And India's space agency has already

  • Paris bans cars along part of River Seine
    AFP

    Paris bans cars along part of River Seine

    Strollers and cyclists can breathe easy on the banks of the Seine after Paris on Monday approved a plan to ban cars on a long stretch of riverside road cutting across the city. A centrepiece of her battle against pollution, the plan has divided opinion in the French capital. "We need to slow down a bit, let go, stop and relax," said Violetta Kolodziejczak, a restaurant greeter.

  • Drug Overdose Cluster in Canada Tied to Opioid-Laced Cocaine
    LiveScience.com

    Drug Overdose Cluster in Canada Tied to Opioid-Laced Cocaine

    More than 40 people in a Canadian city were treated for an opioid overdose this summer after they smoked crack cocaine that had been contaminated with an opioid drug related to fentanyl, according to a new report. In mid-July, a hospital in the city of Surrey, British Columbia, experienced a large spike in patients needing treatment for an opioid overdose — about 11 patients per day needed treatment, up from the usual four patients per day. Most of the patients had become unconscious after smoking what they thought was crack cocaine, the report said.

  • amp.slate.com

    No, NASA Didn’t Change Your Astrological Sign

    Seriously? This again? Over the weekend I started seeing links to articles claiming that NASA has changed the signs of the zodiac. I knew immediately what this was about, even as I was scratching my head about a) how this is news, and 2) how short people’s memories are. I found a few articles about this NASA “news” here and there; there's one on Yahoo that has the headline, “Your Astrological Sign Just Changed, Thanks to NASA.” The first paragraph alone is burdened with quite a few scientific errors: We don’t want to be dramatic, but NASA just ruined our lives. For the first time in 3,000 years, they’ve decided to update the astrological signs. This means that the majority of us are about to

  • Melting Greenland ice threatens to expose Cold War waste
    AFP

    Melting Greenland ice threatens to expose Cold War waste

    A snow-covered former US army base in Greenland -- dubbed "a city under ice" -- could leak pollutants into the environment as the climate changes, raising difficult questions over who is responsible for a clean-up. In 1959, US army engineers began constructing a futuristic project in northwestern Greenland that might as well have been lifted from a Cold War spy movie. A network of tunnels under the snow contained everything from research facilities to a hospital, a cinema and a church -- all powered by a small, portable nuclear reactor.

  • Could holograms help bring the end of malaria? Experts build new tool
    Digital Trends

    Could holograms help bring the end of malaria? Experts build new tool

    Mosquitos are the world’s most deadly animal, according to the World Health Organization, making these insects more than mere pests for some 500 million people every year. Of all the illnesses mosquitos transmit, malaria is by far the most offensive, causing the deaths of as many as 2.7 million people annually. Detecting malaria is pretty straightforward in western medicine.

  • Cosmos Magazine

    Boeing and AIMS team up to protect Great Barrier Reef

    The Great Barrier Reef stretches 2,300 kilometres down Australia's east coast – that's a lot of area to monitor. Aerospace manufacturer Boeing and the Australian Institute of Marine Science have signed a five-year agreement to develop advanced monitoring capabilities to better understand the health of the Great Barrier Reef. Brisbane-based engineers from Boeing will team up with marine scientists to develop innovative sea-to-space technologies including unmanned aerial vehicles, satellites and autonomous underwater vehicles. “Working with Boeing will provide an ideal platform from which we can paint a detailed picture of what is happening on the reef,” AIMS chief John Gunn, a member of the Great Barrier Reef Foundation’s International Science Advisory Committee, said in a press release.