Science

  • Remarkable 3,000-Year-Old Community Dubbed the 'British Pompeii'
    Good Morning America

    Remarkable 3,000-Year-Old Community Dubbed the 'British Pompeii'

    Archaeologists have uncovered a 3,000-year-old, remarkably well-preserved community near Peterborough, England. The excavation at Must Farms, by the Cambridge Archaeological Unit, has unearthed a trove of textiles, pottery and tools that reveal new insights into the lives of our ancestors. The sudden destruction, and then subsequent preservation in the river's non-porous silt, caused many of the artifacts to be preserved incredibly well, archaeologist wrote on their online diary, documenting the findings.

  • Enclave of Estates in Chantilly

    Enclave of Estates in Chantilly

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  • Associated Press

    Russian balloonist hopes to circumnavigate globe on Saturday

    A 65-year-old Russian adventurer was on the brink of setting a record for flying solo in a balloon around the world nonstop and was expected to land in Australia on Saturday, his son said on Friday. Fedor Konyukhov hopes to land in the wheat fields near Northam in Western Australia state, shaving two days off the current record of 13 days and eight hours set by American businessman Steve Fossett in 2002, Oscar Konyukhov said. Fedor Konyukhov lifted off from Northam at 7:30 a.m. local time on July 12 in a carbon box 2 meters (6 feet 7 inches) high, 2 meters (6 feet 7 inches) long and 1.8 meters (5 feet 11 inches) wide suspended from a 56-meter (184-foot) -tall helium and hot-air balloon.

  • Bangladesh: Hidden fault could trigger quake
    CNN

    Bangladesh: Hidden fault could trigger quake

    While the fault lines in this region have been known about for some time, most believed the subduction, and thus the major earthquake threat, had long since ended. Studying the motion of the plates and looking for evidence of seismic movements in Bangladesh is extremely difficult. Steckler, the lead author of the study, described the subduction zone as being "filled with sediments from the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta," causing the fault to be "blind, totally covered by sediments, so in places we only infer its existence." This study utilized more than 10 years' worth of data from highly precise GPS receivers placed around northeast India, Bangladesh and Myanmar. The results allowed the researchers

  • Cosmos Magazine

    New brain map unearths 97 new areas

    A new map of the brain based on scans of 420 people has defined 97 new functional parts of the cortex – the wrinkled grey outer shell – more than doubling previous tallies. The atlas and software, produced by researchers in the US and the Netherlands, combines different imaging and measurement techniques to assign each cortex area a "fingerprint" based on architecture, cell type and function. The work was published in Nature. Mapping the human brain is a centuries-old exercise. The problem is everyone's brain is unique. Until recently, the best scientists could do was assign brain regions by, for instance, cell type. They dissected brains were examined under a microscope and saw different areas

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  • Kerry urges phasing-out of toxic greenhouse gases
    AFP

    Kerry urges phasing-out of toxic greenhouse gases

    US Secretary of State John Kerry on Friday urged signatories of an international ozone pact to back the phasing-out of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) -- toxic greenhouse gases thousands of times more potent than carbon dioxide. "Climate change is happening – and it is happening quicker than most of us ever anticipated," Kerry said. "Week after week, month after month, year after year, we continue to see new evidence, tangible evidence, of the danger climate change poses to our planet.

  • Next week, a meteor shower created by a mysterious comet will reach its peak — here’s how to watch
    Business Insider

    Next week, a meteor shower created by a mysterious comet will reach its peak — here’s how to watch

    The Perseids, one of the most popular meteor showers of the year, is coming up in just under a month. Right now, we are in the middle of a meteor shower called the Delta Aquarids, which began around July 12. Around July 28 and 29, the Delta Aquarids will reach their peak.

  • Alcohol's cancer risks outweigh any health benefits, study shows
    Mashable

    Alcohol's cancer risks outweigh any health benefits, study shows

    “There is no argument, on current evidence, for a safe level of drinking with respect to cancer,” Jennie Connor, the author and a professor of epidemiology at Otago University in New Zealand, wrote in the analysis, published Thursday in the scientific journal Addiction. Connor’s report found there is strong evidence that alcohol causes cancer of the liver, colon, rectum, esophagus, larynx, pharynx and female breast. “Alcohol consumption is one of the most important known risk factors for human cancer and potentially one of the most avoidable factors, but it is increasing worldwide,” the authors of that study wrote.

  • "Shark Tank" Star Reveals #1 Mortgage Payoff Tip

    "Shark Tank" Star Reveals #1 Mortgage Payoff Tip

    If you're over 40 years old and you own a home, you need to read this. (It's not what you think!)

  • The Republican Party Is on the Verge of Extinction
    Foreign Policy Magazine

    The Republican Party Is on the Verge of Extinction

    Seldom does the global public have an opportunity to observe an endangered species in its natural habitat, but this week, wildlife enthusiasts received a rare glimpse into the poignant final days of the American Republican elephant. Recently, however, some unknown constellation of events brought more than 2,000 surviving specimens of E. republicanus to a Cleveland watering hole known locally as the Quicken Loans Arena.

  • The Huffington Post

    Are gifted kids more sensitive to screen violence?

    07/22/2016 01:35 pm 13:35:18 | Updated 1 hour ago The past few weeks have been full of several unfortunate violent events: the massacre in Orlando, the killing of black men by police officers, the sniper attack in Dallas, the Bastille Day attack in France, the violent coup attempt in Turkey and the shooting in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. While many of us may not have been directly affected by these events, we watched the news as it unfolded on broadcast and social media. Witnessing such violence on media can take a severe toll on us even when our near and dear ones are not directly affected. Surprisingly, what research is beginning to uncover is that impact on young children - especially young gifted

  • Reuters

    China completes world's largest amphibious aircraft: Xinhua

    China has completed production of the world's largest amphibious aircraft after seven years of work, which it plans to use to perform marine rescue missions and fight forest fires, the Xinhua news agency reported. The AG600, which is about the size of a Boeing 737 and was developed by state aircraft maker Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AVIC), rolled off a production line in the southern city of Zhuhai on Saturday, Xinhua said quoting the firm. AVIC deputy general manager, Geng Rugang, said the plane was "the latest breakthrough in China's aviation industry." A plan for the development and production of the AG600 received government approval in 2009.

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  • New advance in 3D graphics may make the next Avengers movie look even more realistic
    Digital Trends

    New advance in 3D graphics may make the next Avengers movie look even more realistic

    In short, they’ve figured out how to improve the way graphics software can render light as it interacts with extremely small details on the surface of materials. As a brief explainer, the reflection of light emanating from a material’s small details is called “glints,” and until now, graphics software could only render glints in stills. Ramamoorthi and his colleagues plan to reveal their rendering method at SIGGRAPH 2016 in Anaheim, California, later this month.

  • Why a small agriculture tech company is big business
    The Christian Science Monitor

    Why a small agriculture tech company is big business

    Agriculture is in a tough spot. The population is expected to teeter over 9.6 billion in 2050, and feeding this global citizenry will require a staggering 70 percent more food than the world produces now, says the United Nations. For agriculture, this means increasing production while also contending with the effects of climate change, which have already caused drought around the world. This essential dilemma has spurred innovation and investment in the agricultural industry, including a record $100 million in second-round funds for Indigo, an agriculture technology start-up. The money, awarded Thursday, represents the largest single financing round in the history of the private ag-tech sector,

  • Son Tells Investigators How He Stole Millions With Dad: Part 5
    ABC News Videos

    Son Tells Investigators How He Stole Millions With Dad: Part 5

    Vincent Cabello told investigators where they hid the stolen money in a safe deposit box in Washington.

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  • Philippines reviewing 'crazy' climate pledges: Duterte
    AFP

    Philippines reviewing 'crazy' climate pledges: Duterte

    The Philippines is reviewing its "crazy" commitment to severely cut greenhouse-gas emissions in the Paris climate deal, new President Rodrigo Duterte has warned. The government of predecessor Benigno Aquino had pledged to the United Nations to cut the Asian country's emissions by 70 percent by 2030 from 2000 levels if it got support from developed nations to convert to clean technologies. "I have misgivings about this Paris (climate deal).... The problem is these industrialised countries have reached their destination," Duterte said in a series of speeches during a visit to the southern island of Mindanao on Friday.

  • There's a simple reason why one kind of trip gives you the worst jet lag — and you can use it to make your next trip a breeze
    Business Insider

    There's a simple reason why one kind of trip gives you the worst jet lag — and you can use it to make your next trip a breeze

    No matter how long it lasts, jet lag is never fun, and researchers still haven't found a "cure" for the bothersome side-effect. It turns out that our internal clocks are a bit laggy — they run a tad longer than 24 hours.

  • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    EU approves Monsanto, Bayer genetically modified soybeans

    CHICAGO • The European Commission on Friday approved imports of Monsanto’s Roundup Ready 2 Xtend genetically modified soybean variety, after months of delays that had derailed the company’s product launch this spring. U.S. grain trader and processor Archer Daniels Midland Co. told Reuters on Friday that its elevators and processing plants will now accept the Xtend soybean variety. Rivals Cargill Inc., Bunge Ltd. and CHS Inc., which had also refused to accept the variety without EU import approval, could not be immediately reached for comment. The EU is the second largest importer of soybeans and its approval is not expected to have a major impact on merger talks by German suitor Bayer AG, whose sweetened $64 billion buyout offer of Creve Coeur-based Monsanto was rejected last week, as had been widely anticipated, analysts said on Friday.

  • Mom Has Super Side Effect After Taking Rare Spice

    Mom Has Super Side Effect After Taking Rare Spice

    66 year old, Mary, started taking turmeric to help with her joint aches and pains from years of golf. What happened next completely shocked her.

  • Removing Wylfa nuclear plant's radioactive fuel 'priority'
    BBC News

    Removing Wylfa nuclear plant's radioactive fuel 'priority'

    The push to recover used radioactive fuel from the last nuclear power station of its kind is under way. Wylfa nuclear plant's last reactor was turned off after 44 years at an outage ceremony on Anglesey in December. Workers have spent the past six months putting decommissioning plans into action, including a new safety regime. Removing 800 tonnes of spent Magnox fuel will now be the "dominant" focus over the next three years, officials have said. "Once we are fuel free, over 99% of all the radioactivity on the site will have left," said Gordon Malcolm, deputy site director at Wylfa. "Then the whole site moves on to the next phase of work, preparations for care and maintenance... which will last

  • Ancient Silk Road hygiene sticks lead to a "fluke" discovery
    gizmag

    Ancient Silk Road hygiene sticks lead to a "fluke" discovery

    Thousands of years ago, travelers and traders carried goods across the vast distances between Europe, the Middle East and Asia along routes that collectively become known as the Silk Road. Named after the silks that were exported from China, the routes helped spread news, art and culture through a large part of the world. Now, a new study focused on a 2,000-year-old Silk Road latrine shows that the routes also helped spread something else – disease. A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge and China's Academy of Social Sciences and Gansu Institute for Cultural Relics and Archaeology investigated latrines at the Xuanquanzhi relay station, an archeological site in northwestern China

  • Midwest mugginess linked to crops working up a 'corn sweat'
    Associated Press

    Midwest mugginess linked to crops working up a 'corn sweat'

    The Midwest's first dangerous bout of heat and humidity this summer is partly to blame on the moisture piped out of the ground and into the atmosphere by the increasing acreage of corn crops reaching peak maturity, meteorologists and atmospheric researchers say. Basically, when corn crops mature in late July, they act like billions of straws drawing up soil moisture.

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  • CRISPR-Cas9: Chinese scientists to conduct live human gene-editing trial
    CNN

    CRISPR-Cas9: Chinese scientists to conduct live human gene-editing trial

    Chinese scientists will become the first in the world to inject people with cells modified using gene-editing technology in a groundbreaking clinical trial next month. A team led by Lu You, an oncologist at Sichuan University's West China Hospital in Chengdu, received ethical approval from the hospital's review board on July 6 to test gene-edited cells on lung cancer patients next month, according to scientific journal Nature. The cells will be modified using CRISPR-Cas9 -- a new method of genetic engineering that allows scientists to edit DNA with precision and relative ease. "This technique is of great promise in bringing benefits to patients, especially the cancer patients whom we treat every day," Lu told the journal.

  • LUX: World's most sensitive detector finds no dark matter. What's next?
    Los Angeles Times

    LUX: World's most sensitive detector finds no dark matter. What's next?

    The findings, presented at the Identification of Dark Matter conference in Sheffield, England, were not unexpected — though they do highlight the challenge of finding the elusive stuff known as dark matter. “I couldn’t say with a straight face that I was expecting to find dark matter with this particular data set,” said Simon Fiorucci, an experimental physicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and science coordination manager for LUX. Dark matter can’t be seen, heard or felt – but scientists know something must be there because they watch how its enormous mass turbocharges the spin of galaxies. Everything we can detect in the universe, from Earth to the stars, black holes and distant galaxies – all of it makes up less than 5% of the mass and energy in the universe.

  • Brazil scientists find Zika traces in Culex mosquitoes in wild
    Fox News

    Brazil scientists find Zika traces in Culex mosquitoes in wild

    Brazilian researchers on Thursday said they found signs of the Zika virus in a common mosquito that is a separate species from the insect known to be the primary means of transmission. They warned, however, that further tests are needed to determine whether the species, known as Culex quinquefasciatus, is in fact responsible for transmitting the virus to humans and, if so, to what extent. The scientists, from a leading Brazilian research institute known as the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, discovered the Zika traces in Culex mosquitoes captured in and around the northeastern Brazilian city of Recife, capital of the state that was hit hardest by the Zika outbreak since last year. In March, the same

  • US land capacity for feeding people could expand with dietary changes
    medicalxpress.com

    US land capacity for feeding people could expand with dietary changes

    A new "food-print" model that measures the per-person land requirements of different diets suggests that, with dietary changes, the U.S. could feed significantly more people from existing agricultural land. Using ten different scenarios ranging from the average American diet to a purely vegan one, a team led by scientists from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University estimated that agricultural land in the contiguous U.S. could have the capacity to feed up to 800 million people—twice what can be supported based on current average diets. The researchers found that a vegetarian diet that includes dairy products could feed the most people from the area of land available.