Science

  • Jupiter Moon May Have Water Plumes That Shoot up 125 Miles
    ABC News

    Jupiter Moon May Have Water Plumes That Shoot up 125 Miles

    The Hubble Space Telescope has spied what appear to be water plumes on one of Jupiter's icy moons shooting up as high as 125 miles. The geysers are apparently from an underground ocean that is thought to exist on Europa, considered one of the top places to search for signs of life in our solar system. The plumes at the south pole were detected by the workhorse telescope as the moon passed in front of Jupiter. Even so, the possible presence of plumes, which shoot up and rain back down on the surface, would "allow us to search for signs of life in the ocean of Europa without needing to drill through miles of ice," astronomer William Sparks of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore said Monday.

  • Pillar of Obama climate plan has its day in court
    AFP

    Pillar of Obama climate plan has its day in court

    The cornerstone of President Barack Obama's drive to fight global warming underwent close scrutiny Tuesday in a high-stakes day in court. The so-called Clean Power Plan, approved last year, sets state-by-state emissions targets for existing power plants and aims to reduce America's output of CO2 by nearly a third by 2030 as compared to 2005 levels. The court's action raised doubts about America's contribution to a historic accord to fight global warming, reached in December in Paris, and infuriated environmentalists around the world.

  • A baby with 3 biological parents was born using a new technique — here's what that means
    Business Insider

    A baby with 3 biological parents was born using a new technique — here's what that means

    A baby containing the DNA from three different people was born, New Scientist reports. Three-parent in-vitro fertilization (IVF) was approved in the UK back in 2015, but the team from the New Hope Fertility Center in New York performed the procedure in Mexico. The idea is to substitute that faulty mitochondrial DNA in a mother's egg with a third set of DNA from a donor's egg to avoid these inherited conditions.

  • Meet the nuclear cattle of Fukushima
    CNN

    Meet the nuclear cattle of Fukushima

    Nuclear Cattle On March 11 2011, a 15-meter tsunami triggered by a 8.9-magnitude earthquake, disabled the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima, causing a nuclear accident. Residents within a 20 km radius of the facility were forced to evacuate their homes and leave behind their livelihoods and possessions. Before leaving, some farmers released their cows so they could roam free and survive in the nuclear fallout-affected area. 1,400, however, died from starvation, while the government euthanized 1,500 more. Since 2011, Matsubara has documented both the relationship six farmers have with their surviving herds as well as an ongoing study examining the effects radiation has on large

  • Canada confirms Arctic discovery of 200-year-old ship
    AFP

    Canada confirms Arctic discovery of 200-year-old ship

    Canada's parks department on Monday confirmed the discovery of a British exploration ship that vanished during a storied Arctic expedition in 1846. The statement comes two weeks after scientists from the Arctic Research Foundation announced they had found the ship -- part of a two-vessel expedition during which both disappeared -- submerged but well-preserved beneath 24 meters of water in the Northwest Passage. "Parks Canada's underwater archaeology team is proud to confirm that the wreck located in Terror Bay on the south-west side of King William Island, Nunavut is that of HMS Terror," the government agency said.

  • Did your zodiac sign change? Don't worry, NASA says astrology is still fake
    The Christian Science Monitor

    Did your zodiac sign change? Don't worry, NASA says astrology is still fake

    All over the world, people check their horoscopes to see what's in store for them for the day.  For most, it is an entertaining, meaningless diversion, but a few genuinely believe in their predictions based on their astrological signs sign.  But NASA is causing waves in the astrological community for its recent suggestion that the astrological signs – constellations that are at a certain point in the sky for certain point in the year – have changed as the Earth's axis has shifted over the centuries. The uproar was such that NASA's tumblr felt compelled to release an explanation for the story, emphasizing that astrology is a pseudoscience. The root of the uproar was apparently an article in Cosmopolitan

  • World’s Largest Single-Dish Radio Telescope Begins Testing — NOVA Next
    NOVA Next

    World’s Largest Single-Dish Radio Telescope Begins Testing — NOVA Next

    Astronomers in China have started putting the world’s largest single-dish telescope through its paces, kicking off a new era in radio astronomy. The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, known as FAST, will peer into the corners of the universe to search for, among other things, pulsars. By making detailed measurements of these magnetized, rotating neutron stars, astrophysicists hope to reveal more about gravitational waves, which were first discovered earlier this year. The observatory’s first tests began yesterday. At 1,640 feet across, FAST’s dish is 640 feet larger than the previous record holder, the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. Both dishes are made of perforated aluminum

  • One of the original 'power posing' researchers now says its effects aren't real
    Business Insider

    One of the original 'power posing' researchers now says its effects aren't real

    Authored by Dana Carney and Andy Yap, then of Columbia University, as well as Amy Cuddy of Harvard, the study suggested that standing like Wonder Woman for two minutes could raise testosterone levels and reduce stress hormone levels temporarily. Cuddy gave a TED talk on power posing in 2012 that has been viewed 46 million times, and she's built a lucrative business based partly on the research that power posing works. Dana Carney, who today serves as a professor at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, recently published a report renouncing the effects of power posing.

  • Fox News Latino

    Evolution of large dinosaurs linked to development of bony cranial ornaments

    London –  The evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs such as "Tyrannosaurus rex" was linked to the development of exaggerated cranial ornaments such as crests and horns, a study published Tuesday said. Researchers from the University of North Carolina concluded in a study published in "Nature Communications" magazine that non-avian theropod species possessing ornaments developed larger body sizes than unadorned lineages. Phyletic giantism _ an evolutionary trend toward large size _ can thus be linked to the possession of cranial ornamentation, the study said. The paper found a clear correlation between the evolution of large-sized bodies and the appearance of osseous ornaments, whose "origin and influence across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals," according to the study.

  • Bloomberg

    Russian Airline Owner Moves to Challenge Musk, Bezos in Space

    A Russian airline entrepreneur wants to join the space race, challenging Elon Musk’s Space Exploration Technologies Corp. and Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin LLC with a plan to launch commercial rockets. S7 Group, the owner of Russia’s S7 Airlines, agreed to buy the floating rocket platform Sea Launch from a group of investors and aims to restore its operations after a more than two-year hiatus, the family-owned company said. S7 Group co-founder Vladislav Filev described the deal as an “admission ticket” into the aerospace industry.

  • Asia's poor choking on filthy air
    AFP

    Asia's poor choking on filthy air

    Polluted air is a "public health emergency", the World Health Organization said Tuesday, adding nine out of 10 people globally breathe bad air that is blamed for more than six million deaths a year. Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific region -- including China -- are the hardest hit, the data showed. South Asia is also badly affected, with the WHO saying poor air quality is responsible for the deaths of more than 600,000 people in India and 37,000 people in Bangladesh every year.

  • It's a boy! First baby born with DNA from 3 parents
    CBS News

    It's a boy! First baby born with DNA from 3 parents

    In what experts are calling a “revolutionary” medical event, the first baby with DNA from three parents has been born. The little boy, now nearly six months old, was conceived using a controversial technique meant to help people who carry genes for fatal rare diseases. The procedure received widespread media attention when lawmakers in the U.K. became the first to approve its use last year. It is not approved in the U.S. As first reported in New Scientist, the baby was born on April 6, 2016 and doctors say he appears healthy. His parents were treated by U.S. fertility specialists in Mexico, where there are no laws prohibiting such methods. His mother carries a genetic mutation for Leigh syndrome,

  • Scientists Have Discovered A Way To Kill Superbugs Without Antibiotics
    UPROXX

    Scientists Have Discovered A Way To Kill Superbugs Without Antibiotics

    As antibiotics become more commonplace, whether we need them or not, superbugs are worrying doctors and turning up more and more often. Shu Lam, a graduate student at the University of Melbourne, has a simple solution: Impale the little buggers. Lam is being cautious, noting that she’s only tested it on six superbugs and only done one live trial with mice.

  • Ehud Barak backs startup Reporty, touts emergency tech
    FOX News Videos

    Ehud Barak backs startup Reporty, touts emergency tech

    Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak tells Foxnews.coms James Rogers that startup Reporty Homeland Security will transform emergency systems

  • SpaceX plans to send people to Mars using its Interplanetary Transport System
    TechSpot

    SpaceX plans to send people to Mars using its Interplanetary Transport System

    SpaceX on Tuesday shared with the world its ambitious plan to send humans to another planet for the first time in history. In the crudest explanation, SpaceX will utilize what it’s calling the Interplanetary Transport System (ITS) to get the job done. From the beginning, astronauts and cargo will take off from a traditional launch pad using a rocket system that produces more than 28 million pounds of thrust. Once in a parking orbit, the rocket booster will separate from the spacecraft and head back to Earth. As we’ve seen SpaceX demonstrate multiple times now, the booster will land in an upright position where it’ll immediately be fitted with a propellant tanker and shot back into space. From

  • Big Earthquakes May Be More Likely During New and Full Moons
    Scientific American

    Big Earthquakes May Be More Likely During New and Full Moons

    Every two weeks, on the full and new moons, the sun, moon and Earth fall along a nearly straight line. The combination of gravitational forces in this arrangement creates large swings in the tides. But the celestial alignment affects more than the oceans—it also tugs on Earth’s crust, adding to the stress on faults. This makes it more likely that major earthquakes will strike at these times, according to a new study. The idea isn’t new, but scientists have had a hard time testing the earthquake-tide relationship. For instance, three of the largest earthquakes in recent years happened when tidal stress was high. But those big ones are rare and the link seems to break down for smaller events. So

  • Barrons

    Amgen: The Blame Game

    This morning, Amgen (AMGN) reported that its cancer drug Kyprolis failed to do what it hoped it would in a late-stage trial. RBC’s Michael Yee and Judy Liu wonder if the design of the trial was to blame: Amgen announced the Clarion study (head to head versus Velcade) did not meet stat sig for progression free survival although survival did show a solid trend (Hr=1.21). This is a surprise since the prior Endeavor second line study was a very big success and today’s result in first line may be due to lack of sufficient powering in our view, given strong trend in survival and deeper responses with Kyprolis should better especially earlier. Furthermore, all 3 key-opinion leaders Amgen hosted emphasized

  • ZDNet

    MIT, Google have just dreamt up the drop-down meeting cubicle

    Once all the rage, the open-plan office appears to have fallen out of favor in recent times, with studies showing they contribute to a higher number of sick days and decreased productivity due to constant disruptions. According to a Bloomberg report last year, staff at some open-plan offices have resorted to using red and green cups to signal whether they can or cannot be disturbed. On the other hand, the open-office concept has been zealously embraced in Silicon Valley to support greater collaboration, which can boost productivity as long as the endless interruptions don't have the opposite effect. With this goal in mind, MIT's Self-Assembly Lab, in partnership with Google, has come up with

  • How warm is the Earth? Study suggests a 120,000-year record
    The Christian Science Monitor

    How warm is the Earth? Study suggests a 120,000-year record

    The Earth today is warmer than it’s been in 120,000 years, and could be poised to break a 2-million-year temperature record, thanks to current greenhouse gas levels that may have already committed Earth to an eventual total warming of 5 degrees Celsius over the next few millenniums, according to a new study. The study, published Monday in the journal Nature, constructs a 2-million-year-long temperature record to predict future rises in heat. Using 61 sea surface temperature proxies taken from ocean sediment cores from around the world, Carolyn Snyder, who conducted the research at Stanford University and now works as a climate policy official at the Environmental Protection Agency, looked at average temperatures over periods of 5,000 years, finding that changes in temperature coincided with carbon dioxide levels.

  • WSU research leads to algae treatment for blindness
    Detroit Free Press

    WSU research leads to algae treatment for blindness

    In a coup for Wayne State University’s reputation as a research center, a small eye-care company that uses green algae genes to treat a type of human blindness has sold for $60 million. The company, RetroSense Therapeutics, which is now based at the Ann Arbor SPARK business accelerator, was acquired this month by Allergan, a $4 billion-a-year maker of skin and eye care products. The company's treatment uses a virus to deliver a photoreceptor gene from the algae into a human patient's eye. The research, which aims to cure an inherited disease that causes people to slowly go blind, has shown promise. The Federal Drug Administration gave permission for a clinical trial. Sean Ainsworth, founder and

  • How your big data career is killing other jobs
    TechRepublic

    How your big data career is killing other jobs

    There's a lot of money to be made in data science, as a new O'Reilly report indicates. How much money? Over the last three years, "About half of [those surveyed] reported a 20% change [in salary], and the salary of 12% of the sample doubled." With a median salary of $106,000 for US data professionals, those are significant jumps. Yet, there's also a lot of unemployment. At least, for those people who data science helps to put out of a job. What Patrick McKenzie wrote of engineers is equally true of data scientists: "You're in the business of unemploying people." Data, done right, makes systems more efficient and, inevitably, "efficiency gains" generally translate into "somebody will lose their

  • NASA's Starshade Is Like a Giant Visor for the Stars
    Wired

    NASA's Starshade Is Like a Giant Visor for the Stars

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has come up with an ingenious solution to take better photographs of ultra-bright stars; a baseball diamond-sized folding shade that block out a star's powerful rays.

  • A Rare Black Moon Will Rise In the Sky on Friday Night
    Country Living

    A Rare Black Moon Will Rise In the Sky on Friday Night

    When it comes to rare lunar events, September 2016 seems to be the month that keeps on giving: This Friday, September 30, a Black Moon will rise in the skies of the Western Hemisphere, a phenomenon we haven't seen since March 2014. The Black Moon, which will occur at 8:11 p.m. ET on Friday, will only be happening in the Western Hemisphere because, technically, the new moon will happen on October 1 for the Eastern Hemisphere (they'll be getting their Black Moon at the end of next month). The next time we'll see a second new moon in a single calendar month in the Americas will be July 2019.

  • SpaceX successfully tests Raptor engine it plans to use on Mars flights
    CNN Money

    SpaceX successfully tests Raptor engine it plans to use on Mars flights

    The test was conducted Sunday at the company's testing facility in McGregor, Texas, according to a SpaceX spokesman. SpaceX isn't the only outfit testing rocket engines with an eye on Mars missions. In June, NASA test fired its Space Launch System booster rocket, which it expects to use on its own Mars missions. Musk started SpaceX with the ultimate goal of transporting humans to Mars, and has spoken about his own dreams of living on the planet and even dying there -- "just not on impact." He has said he expects SpaceX to make an unmanned mission to Mars by 2018, using existing technology. He plans to use the Raptor engine for a manned Mars mission by 2025. SpaceX has yet to carry humans into