Science

  • SpaceX Gets Taker for 1st Flight of Recycled Rocket
    ABC News

    SpaceX Gets Taker for 1st Flight of Recycled Rocket

    SpaceX has a taker for the first flight of one of its recycled rockets. The Luxembourg-based company SES — a longtime SpaceX launch customer — said Tuesday it will send its next communications satellite up on a previously flown Falcon rocket. It will be the first true reuse of a rocket previously used for an orbital mission. The launch will take place sometime this fall from Cape Canaveral. "Thanks for the longstanding faith in SpaceX," SpaceX chief Elon Musk said via Twitter. "We very much look forward to doing this milestone flight with you." The chief technology officer at SES, Martin Halliwell, said SpaceX's testing for the upcoming mission gives his company "full confidence." SES was the

  • Tasmanian Devils Evolving Genetic Resistance to Cancer Threatening Species
    Good Morning America

    Tasmanian Devils Evolving Genetic Resistance to Cancer Threatening Species

    Tasmanian devils are evolving genetic resistance to a contagious and deadly cancer that's been pushing the endangered species to the brink of extinction, an international team of scientists has found. Devil facial tumor disease (DFTD), a nearly 100 percent fatal cancer first detected 20 years ago, has wiped out an estimated 80 percent of the Australian marsupials, according to a news release from Washington State University. Because Tasmanian devils often display aggression by biting each other's faces, DFTD -- one of only three known transmissible cancers -- is easily spread among the animals, WSU said.

  • ABC News

    In Drought, Drones Help California Farmers Save Every Drop

    A drone whirred to life in a cloud of dust, then shot hundreds of feet skyward for a bird's-eye view of a vast tomato field in California's Central Valley, the nation's most productive farming region. Equipped with a state-of-the-art thermal camera, the drone crisscrossed the field, scanning it for cool, soggy patches where a gopher may have chewed through the buried drip irrigation line and caused a leak. In the drought-prone West, where every drop of water counts, California farmers are in a constant search for ways to efficiently use the increasingly scarce resource. Cannon Michael is putting drone technology to work on his fields at Bowles Farming Co. near Los Banos, 120 miles southeast of

  • Proof of alien life? Strong signal from outer space sends internet into a frenzy
    CNBC.com

    Proof of alien life? Strong signal from outer space sends internet into a frenzy

    A "strong signal' from outer space is catching the attention of scientists, particularly those at the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project. The signal was detected by a telescope in Russia, according to writer Paul Gilster, who runs the website Centauri Dreams.

  • Fall from a tree may have caused death of 'Lucy' the famed fossil
    Reuters

    Fall from a tree may have caused death of 'Lucy' the famed fossil

    By Jon Herskovitz AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) - Lucy, one of the best known ancestors of humans to ever roam the earth, may have died after a fall from a tree, University of Texas researchers said on Monday after studying her 3.18-million-year-old fossilized remains. A high resolution X-ray CT (computed tomography) study of Lucy, a female hominid, indicates she suffered fractures to her right humerus not typically seen in fossils. The injuries were consistent with those "caused by a fall from considerable height when the conscious victim stretched out an arm in an attempt to break the fall," according to the research from John Kappelman, a University of Texas anthropology and geological sciences professor, who consulted with Stephen Pearce, an orthopedic surgeon at Austin Bone and Joint Clinic.

  • Associated Press

    Obama to open conservation tour in Lake Tahoe and Hawaii

    President Barack Obama is opening a two-day environmental tour aimed at showcasing conservation efforts before traveling to Asia, where climate change is high on the agenda for his final trip to the region. In Nevada on Wednesday, Obama plans to visit Lake Tahoe and speak at a summit dedicated to the iconic lake's preservation. Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, who like Obama is in his final year in office, has hosted the summit for 20 years and asked Obama to attend.

  • LiveScience.com

    Anthony Weiner: Do Cheaters Always Do It Again?

    In the wake of the news that former New York Rep. Anthony Weiner was caught (once again) sexting with a woman who is not his wife, the country let out a collective sigh. But Weiner's case is unusual, because his behavior looks more like a sexual compulsion or addiction, said Pepper Schwartz, a sociologist at the University of Washington and co-author of "The Normal Bar: The Surprising Secrets of Happy Couples," (Harmony, 2013). "It's about this kind of thrill that he gets showing his body to some anonymous woman, and you call it an addiction or a compulsion when they can't stop it even in the face of catastrophic consequences," Schwartz told Live Science.

  • SETI’s alien signal? Don’t get too excited.
    Washington Post

    SETI’s alien signal? Don’t get too excited.

    In the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), scientists can sometimes run into one particularly sticky problem. They can't describe anything as "interesting" without whipping the Internet into an alien-hunting frenzy. Case in point, the latest SETI news: A radio telescope has picked up a "signal" that Russian astronomers believe might be coming from HD 164595, a sun-size star less than 100 light years away from Earth that hosts a planet about the same mass as Neptune. The SETI Institute says it's "interesting." Cue the alien hopefuls. I want us to find intelligent life just as much as the next guy — probably more than most people, because that would be quite a story — but let's not

  • Mountain Dew versus Coca-Cola experiment shows which drink dissolves teeth quickest
    Mashable

    Mountain Dew versus Coca-Cola experiment shows which drink dissolves teeth quickest

    Ever wondered exactly what effect those sweet, sugary drinks might be having on your teeth? We know fizzy drinks like Mountain Dew and Coca-Cola aren't great for the old gnashers, but the video above — a guest episode of Tom Scott's "Things you might

  • Is a Blue Fire Tornado the Future of Oil Spill Cleanup?
    LiveScience.com

    Is a Blue Fire Tornado the Future of Oil Spill Cleanup?

    A blue fire tornado sounds like it could be an alarming natural disaster, but this phenomenon could actually offer a way to burn fuel with reduced carbon emissions, a new study finds. A fire tornado, or fire whirl, can occur during urban and wildland fires, threatening life, property and the surrounding environment. Traditional, yellow fire whirls gain their color from radiating soot particles, according to study co-author Elaine Oran, a professor of engineering at the University of Maryland.

  • First secret from ancient stone tablet revealed
    CBS News

    First secret from ancient stone tablet revealed

    An ancient tablet recently unearthed in Tuscany has revealed its first secret: the engraved name of a goddess linked to fertility. The 500-pound (227 kilograms) stone slab, or stele, was unearthed earlier this year at Poggio Colla, a sixth century B.C. site built by the Etruscans. The stele bears a long inscription in a language that has not been used for 2,500 years, project archaeologist Gregory Warden, a professor emeritus at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, told Live Science in April. Now, translation is underway and archaeologists have discovered that the tablet references the goddess Uni. [Photos: The Tomb of an Etruscan Prince] “We can at this point affirm that this discovery is

  • In drought, drones help California farmers save every drop
    Associated Press

    In drought, drones help California farmers save every drop

    Equipped with a state-of-the-art thermal camera, the drone crisscrossed the field, scanning it for cool, soggy patches where a gopher may have chewed through the buried drip irrigation line and caused a leak. In the drought-prone West, where every drop of water counts, California farmers are in a constant search for ways to efficiently use the increasingly scarce resource. Cannon Michael is putting drone technology to work on his fields at Bowles Farming Co. near Los Banos, 120 miles southeast of San Francisco.

  • Yes, your dog really can understand you
    CNBC.com

    Yes, your dog really can understand you

    Sit. Roll over. Fetch. Do dogs really know what people are saying? A study published this week in the journal "Science" suggests dogs can understand both the words that humans speak and the way they are intoned. That would mean the basic brain chemistry needed to process language may be much older than the human species, and is likely present in other animals. A team of researchers from Eotvos Lorand University in Hungary trained dogs to lie still in a functional MRI brain scanner. They then looked at the parts of the dogs' brains that lit up when they heard various words in different intonations. The dogs heard some words of praise, and words that were meaningless, in both praising and neutral

  • Six Scientists Lived in a Tiny Pod for a Year Pretending They Were on Mars
    Wired

    Six Scientists Lived in a Tiny Pod for a Year Pretending They Were on Mars

    It sounds nuts, and maybe you have to be, but Six scientists completed a yearlong NASA-funded Mars simulation in Hawaii, where they lived in a dome in near isolation.

  • Associated Press

    Africa's elephants rapidly declining as poaching thrives

    The number of savanna elephants in Africa is rapidly declining and the animals are in danger of being wiped out as international and domestic ivory trades drive poaching across the continent, according to a study released Wednesday. Africa's savanna elephant population plummeted by about 30 percent from 2007 to 2014 and is declining at about 8 percent a year, said a survey funded by Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Paul Allen. "If we can't save the African elephant, what is the hope of conserving the rest of Africa's wildlife?" elephant ecologist Mike Chase, the lead researcher, said in a statement.

  • LiveScience.com

    How Does Listeria Get into Veggies?

    About 30,000 cases of precut vegetables are being recalled in many Southeastern states because they could be contaminated with Listeria. This week, the food manufacturer Country Fresh announced a recall of several of its vegetable products — including precut onions, mushrooms and peppers — after one of its products being sold in a Georgia grocery store tested positive for Listeria bacteria. The recall affects products sold at a number of grocery stores — including Walmart, Harris Teeter and Winn-Dixie — in nine Southern states (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia).

  • This is what it looks like when society collapses
    Business Insider

    This is what it looks like when society collapses

    Before society collapses, it slows down. A team of researchers examined the archaeological record that Neolithic European — that is, between 3,000 and 10,000 years — societies left in the years before several different collapses. Sean Downey, a University of Maryland anthropologist and a researcher on the study, said that to understand what it means for a society to slow down, you should imagine a rainforest.

  • The Daily Beast

    MH370 Search May Have Missed the Wreckage, Investigators Admit

    The undersea search for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 may have missed the wreckage, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, leading the search, admitted Tuesday to The Daily Beast. The Daily Beast can also reveal the Dutch company providing one of the search vessels, Fugro, admitted as far back as June that there were gaps in sonar coverage of the ocean floor that needed further investigation. As a result, a search that has so far cost $180 million and that was expected to end this summer could now be extended into next year. This will be encouraging news for the families of the passengers and crew on the flight who feared that the search was being prematurely curtailed. The ATSB says that a

  • 60% of key S.Asian water basin not usable: study
    AFP

    60% of key S.Asian water basin not usable: study

    Sixty percent of the groundwater in a river basin supporting more than 750 million people in Pakistan, India, Nepal and Bangladesh is not drinkable or usable for irrigation, researchers said Monday. The biggest threat to groundwater in the Indo-Gangetic Basin, named after the Indus and Ganges rivers, is not depletion but contamination, they reported in the journal Nature Geoscience. Up to a depth of 200 metres (650 feet), some 23 percent of the groundwater stored in the basin is too salty, and about 37 percent "is affected by arsenic at toxic concentrations," they said.

  • Think older investors are much less likely to take risks? Think again
    MarketWatch

    Think older investors are much less likely to take risks? Think again

    Don’t assume grandpa is always going to take the safe route in life or in markets. That’s the suggestion from a new study by German researchers. Test subjects in the study played a “stag hunt” game that is widely used by academics, and older participants took the riskier route more frequently. In the game, two people go hunting, and if they work together, they can bag a bigger animal — the stag. If they work alone, they end up on track to just get a rabbit. The key risk is that a player could decide in favor of teaming up to go for the stag, but the other player already may have opted to work alone and settle for the rabbit. That leaves the solo stag hunter with a high chance of being left empty-handed.

  • Meet the 85-year-old Woman Taking a Trip to Space
    Travel+Leisure

    Meet the 85-year-old Woman Taking a Trip to Space

    Dolores Seiler, who just turned 85 years old this June, is currently on the waiting list to take a journey to space. Seiler has signed up for her trip through World View Enterprises, a balloon-based space-tourism company that will start taking passengers to space in a capsule that is attached to a 40-million-cubic-foot helium balloon (approximately the size of an NFL football field). The company is still in the process of finalizing its system before it officially launches, which could be sometime in 2018, according to Andrew Antonio, director of marketing at World View.

  • Is there a right way and wrong way to begin an email?
    FOX News Videos

    Is there a right way and wrong way to begin an email?

    'Red Eye' weighs in on column's call to end one common phrase

  • 10 Unravelled Secrets Of The Mayan Civilization
    Listverse

    10 Unravelled Secrets Of The Mayan Civilization

    The Maya are perhaps one of the world’s most successful and brilliant civilizations. Thanks to the hard work of dedicated researchers and archaeologists, many secrets of this once-powerful civilization are now starting to unravel. 10 Recipe For Maya Blue The Maya considered a certain shade of blue to be a highly significant color. Known as Maya Blue, this color was used to cover pots, palace walls, and codices. In addition, it was also used to cover the bodies of human sacrifices. Though scientists knew the two main ingredients of Maya Blue were indigo and palygorskite, they were at loss as to what the mysterious third ingredient was. In 2008, US researchers published a study claiming that copal

  • Adorable American Pika Is Disappearing Due to Climate Change
    LiveScience.com

    Adorable American Pika Is Disappearing Due to Climate Change

    The American pika, a pint-size rabbit relative, is feeling the heat: Hotter summers induced by climate change are threatening these cute creatures' habitats throughout the western United States. A new study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) found that whole populations of the tiny mammal are disappearing due to climate change. After studying the cute critters from 2012 to 2015, the USGS found that the pikas' range was shrinking in southern Utah, northeastern California and the Great Basin, the latter of which covers most of Nevada as well as parts of Utah, Oregon, Idaho and California.

  • LiveScience.com

    Watch Out for Wasps: Insect Sting Causes Man's Stroke

    People's reactions to getting stung by a bee or wasp can range from a feeling bit of pain to a suffering a deadly allergy reaction — and now a recent report of one man's case highlights a particularly rare complication of a sting: having a stroke. A stroke occurs when a part of a person's brain is starved of blood, typically because of a blood clot or a leaky blood vessel. Dr. Michael DeGeorgia, who treated the man, told Live Science that he had never before seen a case where a stroke was caused by a wasp sting.