Science

  • Associated Press

    Up there: Netherlands, Latvia lead world for people's height

    If you want to see a tall population of men, go to the Netherlands. National height averages are useful as an indicator of nutrition, health care, environment and general health that people have experienced from the womb through adolescence, said Majid Ezzati of Imperial College London, who led the research. The tallest men in the new analysis were Dutch, with an average height of about 6 feet (182.5 centimeters).

  • HPE: Accelerating Next

    HPE: Accelerating Next

    See What HPE Can Do for You. The #1 Company in Hybrid Infrastructure.

  • LiveScience.com

    Goodbye, Weasels! New Zealand to Wipe Out Its Invasive Predators

    The clock is ticking for the rats, possums and weasels that have invaded New Zealand over the past few hundred years. Before humans landed in New Zealand less than 800 years ago, precious few mammals lived on the islands — a vibrant archipelago that provided a home for flightless birds, such as the kiwi, takahe­ and kakapo parrot, as well as geckos and lizard-like tuataras. "While once the greatest threat to our native wildlife was poaching and deforestation, it is now introduced predators," Key said in a statement.

  • 'Brain training' cut dementia risk in healthy adults, study finds
    Fox News

    'Brain training' cut dementia risk in healthy adults, study finds

    A computerized brain training program cut the risk of dementia among healthy people by 48 percent, U.S. researchers said on Sunday in reporting an analysis of the results of a 10-year study. The preliminary findings, presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Toronto, are the first to show that any kind of intervention could delay the development of dementia in normal, healthy adults. To date, cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists have largely rejected evidence that computer-based cognitive-training software or "brain games" have any effect on cognitive function. The new findings would be quite promising if they hold up through peer review and publication in a scientific journal, said Dr. John King, an expert in social research at the National Institute of Aging.

  • Was this ancient organism the first life on Earth, or just the luckiest?
    Washington Post

    Was this ancient organism the first life on Earth, or just the luckiest?

    It was Charles Darwin who first guessed at the mysterious creature that gave rise to all life as we know it. "Probably all the organic beings which have ever lived on this Earth have descended from some primordial form, into which life was first breathed," he wrote in "On the Origin of Species" in 1859. But that primordial form lived and died 4 billion years ago. Its traits — where it lived, what it ate, how it survived the brutal conditions on early Earth — are obscured by time and a scant fossil record. So researchers have tried to learn about the Last Universal Common Ancestor, or LUCA, by looking at its legacy: every creature alive on Earth today. In a study published Monday in the journal

  • Massive wildfire near Los Angeles kills one person, forces thousands to flee
    Mashable

    Massive wildfire near Los Angeles kills one person, forces thousands to flee

    What began as a brush fire last Friday rapidly morphed into a raging blaze over the weekend, burning more than 33,000 acres and destroying at least 18 homes in Los Angeles County. Only about 10 percent of the wildfire was contained by Sunday night, the Los Angeles County Fire Department reported. “All the experience we’ve had with fires is out the window,” John Tripp, the county’s deputy fire chief, told the Associated Press.

  • Most Americans don't want superhumans to exist in real life
    Newsweek

    Most Americans don't want superhumans to exist in real life

    A recent Pew Research Center survey and accompanying focus group spells out how Americans feel about using biomedical innovation to alter the human body and its performance capacity. The center asked Americans about the use of gene editing, brain chips and synthetic blood enhancements and found that most have little interest in melding man with machine.  Let's take a brief look at three interesting findings from Pew's latest survey—and ask yourself where you fall in the mix. First, consider your religious commitment. Do you pray or attend religious services often, occasionally, or not at all? Survey participants who reported practicing a faith less often than others “are more inclined to see

  • Bloody Leaves from King Albert's Deadly Fall Are Authentic, DNA Shows
    LiveScience.com

    Bloody Leaves from King Albert's Deadly Fall Are Authentic, DNA Shows

    Using DNA tests, scientists have confirmed the authenticity of a morbid souvenir: bloodstained leaves that were taken from the death site of Belgium's King Albert I more than 80 years ago. Albert, who ruled from 1909 until his death, was celebrated for his role in World War I, as he refused to let German troops through Belgium to attack France. An avid mountaineer, he died on Feb. 17, 1934, when he was climbing alone near the village of Marche-les-Dames, southeast of Brussels.

  • Final Goodbye - 'She Was The Love of My Life'

    Final Goodbye - 'She Was The Love of My Life'

    Burt Opens Up Finally About Sally Relationship.

  • AFP

    African children to suffer as El Nino winds down: NGO

    Millions of children will suffer disproportionately from the failed harvests and devastated livelihoods left behind by the El Nino weather phenomenon, Save the Children warned Tuesday. El Nino affects rainfall patterns and causes both drought and flooding. As it recedes the Pacific cooling trend known as La Nina is set to begin.

  • Scientists say we’ll only get one year to prepare if a super-volcano erupts
    Business Insider

    Scientists say we’ll only get one year to prepare if a super-volcano erupts

    Super volcanic eruptions are so catastrophically powerful that they could devastate the entire planet. In a worst case scenario, these kinds of eruptions can eject 1000s of cubic kilometers of magma and ash in the matter of days or few months. That much ash in the atmosphere could block out the light and heat of the sun for years or decades. Unlike most volcanic eruptions, what makes super-eruptions different is that they are unable to erupt easily.

  • Israel to display ancient mummy with modern-day afflictions
    Associated Press

    Israel to display ancient mummy with modern-day afflictions

    Israel's national museum is set to display a 2,200-year-old Egyptian mummy of a man who was afflicted with some modern-day illnesses such as osteoporosis and tooth decay, the museum said on Tuesday. The mummy is the only such relic in Israel, named the "Protective Eye of Horus," after a pharaonic deity. It was kept for decades at a Jesuit institute in Jerusalem before it was loaned to the Israel Museum.

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  • Solar plane circles globe in first for clean energy
    Reuters

    Solar plane circles globe in first for clean energy

    By Stanley Carvalho ABU DHABI (Reuters) - A solar-powered aircraft successfully completed the first fuel-free flight around the world on Tuesday, returning to Abu Dhabi after an epic 16-month voyage that demonstrated the potential of renewable energy. The plane, Solar Impulse 2, touched down in the United Arab Emirates capital at 0005 GMT (0405 local time) on Tuesday. It first took off from Abu Dhabi on March 9, 2015, beginning a journey of about 40,000 km (24,500 miles) and nearly 500 hours of flying time.

  • Mexico finds water tunnels under Pakal tomb in Palenque
    Washington Post

    Mexico finds water tunnels under Pakal tomb in Palenque

    MEXICO CITY — Archaeologists at Mexico’s Mayan ruin site of Palenque have discovered an underground water tunnel built under the Temple of Inscriptions, which houses the tomb of Mayan ruler Pakal. Archaeologist Arnoldo Gonzalez says researchers believe the tomb and pyramid were purposely built atop the spring between 683 and 702 AD. The tunnels led water under the funeral chamber and give Pakal’s spirit a path to the underworld. Attention has focused on the heavily carved sarcophagus in which Pakal was placed, and which some erroneously believe depict the Maya ruler seated in a spaceship. But Gonzalez said Monday carvings on a pair of stone ear plugs found in the grave say a god “will guide the

  • Report: DNC hackers left evidence trail with ties to Moscow
    FOX News Videos

    Report: DNC hackers left evidence trail with ties to Moscow

    Catherine Herridge reports from Washington, D.C.

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  • 'Thrifty' gene mutation that boosts fast storage fuels Samoa obesity problem
    International Business Times UK

    'Thrifty' gene mutation that boosts fast storage fuels Samoa obesity problem

    A 'thrifty' gene mutation that boosts fat storage may be the reason Samoa is one of the fattest countries in the world. Researchers say that when the first people arrived in Samoa, natural selection favoured those who could store more fat because of food insecurity issue. However, our modern lifestyles and diets now means this gene has a detrimental effect, leading to soaring rates of obesity and the health problems that go with it. At present, Samoa is the sixth fattest nation on Earth. In 2010, 80% of men and 91% of women were overweight or obese. In a study published in the journal Nature Genetics, an international team of researchers analysed the genomes of over 3,000 Samoans to identify

  • Associated Press

    Hollywood stars hold climate rally ahead of DNC

    More than 1,000 people joined Hollywood stars including Shailene Woodley, Susan Sarandon and Danny Glover in Philadelphia last night on the eve of the Democratic National Convention and vowed to keep fighting for climate and environmental justice issues, even though their preferred presidential candidate would not be driving the party's agenda. Sarandon, who like the other stars in attendance campaigned on behalf of Sen. Bernie Sanders, said the rally's turnout was proof that theirs was a movement and not a cult of personality as some critics alleged.

  • That's Insane! Daring Skydiver 'Surfs' on Storm Clouds
    LiveScience.com

    That's Insane! Daring Skydiver 'Surfs' on Storm Clouds

    Earlier this month, MacCormac, a member of the Red Bull Air Force's collection of skydivers and pilots, strapped a board to his feet and "surfed" down the edge of a storm cloud over central Florida. "It's one of those things that's so wrong," MacCormac told Live Science. What may be even more unreasonable is that this wasn't MacCormac's first jump into a thunderstorm.

  • High Interest Payday Loans are Ancient History

    High Interest Payday Loans are Ancient History

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  • Spain calls in army as wildfire reaches nature reserve
    AFP

    Spain calls in army as wildfire reaches nature reserve

    Spanish troops intervened Tuesday as a wildfire near the eastern city of Valencia spread to a nature reserve after laying waste to some 1,400 hectares (3,500 acres) of land, regional authorities said.

  • Researchers just discovered the world’s deepest underwater sinkhole in the South China Sea
    Washington Post

    Researchers just discovered the world’s deepest underwater sinkhole in the South China Sea

    As local fishermen tell it, the deep blue “Dragon Hole” in the Xisha Islands, called the “eye” of the South China Sea, is where the Monkey King in Journey to the West acquired his famous golden cudgel. After nearly a year of exploration, Chinese researchers have determined that the underwater sinkhole is likely the world’s deepest, reaching about 987 feet below the surface and surpassing the previous record holder, Dean’s Blue Hole near the Bahamas, by more than 300 feet, Xinhua News Agency reported. Blue holes are named as such for their rich, dark blue coloring, a stark contrast to the otherwise aqua waters that surround them. Researchers with the Sansha Ship Course Research Institute for Coral Protection began exploring Dragon Hole, known as Longdong, in August 2015 and completed the project last month, Xinhua reported.

  • Reuters

    Meter-wide dinosaur print, one of largest ever, found in Bolivia

    A footprint measuring over a meter wide that was made by a meat-eating predator some 80 million years ago has been discovered in Bolivia, one of the largest of its kind ever found. The print, which measures 1.2 meters (1.3 yards) across, probably belonged to the abelisaurus, a biped dinosaur that once roamed South America, said Argentine paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia, who is studying the find. The print was found some 64 kilometers (40 miles) outside the city of Sucre in central Bolivia by a tourist guide earlier this month.

  • Who Invented Air Conditioning?
    Time

    Who Invented Air Conditioning?

    Carrier, who saw himself as the Thomas Edison of air conditioners, changed the world with his invention—but its original aims were much smaller than that. The air conditioner, built to both cool a room and reduce humidity, was originally created to keep moist air in a printing plant from wrinkling magazine pages. Research he produced for the company saved them $40,000 a year, and Carrier was put in charge of a new department of experimental engineering, where he designed his first air-conditioner for the printing plant.

  • 3D-printing project makes building lab equipment as easy as snapping Legos together
    Digital Trends

    3D-printing project makes building lab equipment as easy as snapping Legos together

    Legos are one of the most versatile toys around because you can, with enough bricks and imagination, build anything you want. “[Right now,] if you want to do a lot of different things in science, you need a lot of different instruments,” William Grover, assistant pofessor of boengineering, tells Digital Trends. Researchers could use these blocks to build virtually any instrument they might need.

  • Accesswire

    Thunder Energies Corporation Chief Scientist Honored at the University of La Rochelle, France

    TARPON SPRINGS, FL / ACCESSWIRE / July 25, 2016 / Thunder Energies Corporation (TNRG), announces that its Chief Scientist, Dr. R. M. Santilli, has been honored with a Technical Achievement Award by the University of La Rochelle, France, under co-sponsorship by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the International Federation of Non-Linear Analysis, the International Federation of Information Processing, the American Institute of Physics, and other institutions. Thunder Energies Corporation, a publicly traded company with OTC stock symbol TNRG, announces that its Chief Scientist, Dr. R. M. Santilli, has been honored with a Technical Achievement Award by the University of La Rochelle, France, under co-sponsorship by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the International Federation of Non-Linear Analysis, the International Federation of Information Processing, the American Institute of Physics, and other institutions.

  • How Older Women Tighten Skin

    How Older Women Tighten Skin

    1 Brilliant Tip to Tighten Wrinkles Revealed.

  • This is what would happen if a comet smacked into Earth
    Business Insider

    This is what would happen if a comet smacked into Earth

    With the Delta Aquarid meteor shower going on right now, and the crowd-favorite Perseid meteor shower hot on its heels, the next few weeks are going to be the prime-time to watch some shooting stars light up the night sky. NASA is on the lookout for any cosmic objects on a crash course with our planet, and it's found that the chances of us colliding with a comet or asteroid anytime soon are pretty low. If a comet of this size struck Earth, then the energy of the impact would be about as much as 300 times that of the asteroid that scientists believed wiped out the dinosaurs, Donald Yeomans, a senior research scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, told LiveScience.

  • Flight 370: With search suspended, a cold-case file awaits
    Associated Press

    Flight 370: With search suspended, a cold-case file awaits

    "I am not surprised it's coming to an end without any answers," Tony Wong, a businessman in Kuala Lumpur, said Monday. The Boeing 777-200ER vanished on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8, 2014. Investigators believed it turned back west and then south before dropping into the Indian Ocean west of Australia, where the search has been concentrated. The Malaysian government has concluded that it was deliberately steered off course.