Science

  • Russia Emergency Teams Look for Debris of Crashed Spacecraft
    ABC News

    Russia Emergency Teams Look for Debris of Crashed Spacecraft

    Russian emergencies workers are combing the mountains near the border with Mongolia for the debris of a cargo spaceship that crashed minutes after its launch. The Emergencies Ministry's branch in the republic of Tuva said Friday it's using drones to search for fragments of the unmanned Progress MS-04 craft that crashed Thursday less than 7 minutes after its launch from Russia's space complex in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. There has been no indication of any damage in the sparsely populated area. The craft was carrying 2.5 metric tons of supplies to the International Space Station. Russian space officials haven't yet identified the reason for the crash, but believe it was caused by the failure of the

  • ABC News

    SpaceX Shooting for Mid-December Launch, 1st Since Blast

    SpaceX is shooting for a mid-December launch, its first since a dramatic rocket accident on the pad. Iridium Communications Inc. said Thursday that 10 of its satellites will be aboard the SpaceX Falcon rocket tentatively scheduled to take off from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Dec. 16. That would end a 3 ?-month launch hiatus by SpaceX. The Federal Aviation Administration must first sign off on the accident investigation. SpaceX says the investigation is nearly complete. A massive fireball engulfed a Falcon rocket on the pad at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on Sept. 1. The rocket's helium pressurization system was breached as fueling was underway for a test firing. Engineers have zeroed

  • Researchers Figure Out the Reason for Your Cat’s Weird Tongue with a Giant 3D Model
    People

    Researchers Figure Out the Reason for Your Cat’s Weird Tongue with a Giant 3D Model

    Your cat’s cute lil’ pink tongue has long been a source of terror for anyone who has looked too closely at it. For larger cats, it was assumed that they had rough tongues to help them scrape bloody meat from bone — because your cat is nothing if not a scaled-down lion or tiger, never forget that — but now, researchers at Georgia Tech have uncovered another purpose to the many tiny hooks adorning a kitty’s tongue.

  • Bernie Sanders burns the House Science Committee for promoting a misleading article on climate change
    Business Insider

    Bernie Sanders burns the House Science Committee for promoting a misleading article on climate change

    On Thursday, The House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology tweeted a misleading article published by Breitbart about the state of the global climate. Icy Silence from Climate Alarmists," the tweet read. The article starts by asserting that "Global land temperatures have plummeted by one degree Celsius since the middle of this year – the biggest and steepest fall on record," citing an article from The Daily Mail that fails to place the statistic in context (more on that below). Breitbart then states, without any evidence, that "the news has been greeted with an eerie silence by the world's alarmist community," a term used by climate science doubters to describe climate scientists and the reporters who cover their work.

  • Scientists Pinpoint How to Calm Oklahoma's Human-Made Quakes
    LiveScience.com

    Scientists Pinpoint How to Calm Oklahoma's Human-Made Quakes

    Human-induced earthquakes have rattled Oklahoma in recent years, a state known more for its wide-open plains than havoc-wreaking temblors. This water is pumped as part of the oil and gas production process in Oklahoma and other states in the central and eastern United States. Injecting wastewater from oil and gas extraction into underground wells has occurred for decades in Oklahoma without raising concern over induced seismicity, but in 2009, the rate and volume of injection massively increased, according to the study.

  • Chemists officially add new elements to the periodic table
    Engadget

    Chemists officially add new elements to the periodic table

    These four superheavy elements -- they break down into lighter elements quickly -- were synthesized between 2002 and 2010 by Japanese, Russian and American teams. The scientists sent in their name proposals in June but had to go through a five-month waiting period. Wondering how the teams came up with those names? The Japanese researchers who created element 113 based Nihonium from the word "Nihon," which means Japan in the country's language. Element 115's Russian creators named it Moscovium after Moscow, while their countrymen who made element 118 (with the help of American scientists) named theirs Oganesson after Yuri Oganessian. He's a Russian nuclear physicist who helped discover the heaviest

  • Human ancestor 'Lucy' adept at tree climbing as well as walking
    Reuters

    Human ancestor 'Lucy' adept at tree climbing as well as walking

    By Jon Herskovitz AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) - Scientists using sophisticated scanning technology on the fossil bones of the ancient human ancestor from Ethiopia dubbed "Lucy" have determined that she was adept at climbing trees as well as walking, an ability that in her case may have proven fatal. Researchers on Wednesday announced the results of an intensive analysis of the 3.18 million-year-old fossils of Lucy, a member of a species early in the human evolutionary lineage known as Australopithecus afarensis. The scans of Lucy's arm bones showed they were heavily built, like chimpanzees, indicating that members of this species spent significant time climbing in trees and used their arms to pull themselves up in the branches.

  • New conservative ‘watch list’ targets professors for advancing ‘leftist propaganda’
    Washington Post

    New conservative ‘watch list’ targets professors for advancing ‘leftist propaganda’

    It’s called “Professor Watchlist,” which, according to the website, is a listing of professors at U.S. colleges and universities who allegedly “discriminate against conservative students and advance leftist propaganda in the classroom.” It’s not the first such list of academics who say/do one thing or another that some people find threatening, but it is the newest, having been started late last month. Critics have said it is an assault on academic freedom. The watch list is a project of the nonprofit organization Turning Point USA, which, according to its website, is a national movement that seeks to “educate students about the importance of fiscal responsibility, limited government, and free markets.” The nonprofit’s founder and executive director is 23-year-old Charlie Kirk, who, according to the Daily Herald, graduated from Wheeling High School in Illinois and then turned down an invitation to attend Baylor University and took some education classes at Harper College in Palatine, Ill., while he founded the nonprofit.

  • Bloomberg

    Russia Is Building Its Own Silicon Valley in Siberia

    Sixty years ago, the Soviet Union tried to turn the Siberian city of Akademgorodok into a scientific outpost. It tempted engineers and researchers to live in the middle of nowhere by offering them spacious apartments, delicious food, and the promise

  • ABC News

    Russia: Space Ship Malfunctions, Breaks up Over Siberia

    An unmanned Russian cargo spaceship heading to the International Space Station broke up in the atmosphere over Siberia on Thursday due to an unspecified malfunction, the Russian space agency said. The Progress MS-04 cargo craft broke up at an altitude of 190 kilometers (118 miles) over the remote Russian Tuva region in Siberia that borders Mongolia, Roscosmos said in a statement. It said most of spaceship's debris burnt up as it entered the atmosphere but some fell to Earth over what it called an uninhabited area. Local people reported seeing a flash of light and hearing a loud thud west of the regional capital of Kyzyl, more than 3,600 kilometers (2,200 miles) east of Moscow, the Tuva government

  • ABC News

    Nations OK European Space Agency's Mission to Mars in 2020

    Nations have approved an additional 440 million euros ($469 million) to fund the European Space Agency's next mission to Mars. As part of the ExoMars mission, the agency this year sent an orbiter and a test lander to the red planet. The Trace Gas Orbiter was successfully deployed but the Schiaparelli lander malfunctioned and a href='https://www.apnews.com/57477f19a45b4751a27ab57971e4d4b9/Hard-crash-landing-may-have-wrecked-Europe's-Mars-probe'crashed on the surface/a of Mars, raising fears about the next stage of the mission. Despite the crash, officials meeting in Lucerne, Switzerland, on Friday approved the budget that ESA said it requires to send a rover to Mars in 2020. In all, member states

  • France detects H5N8 bird flu on duck farm
    Fox News

    France detects H5N8 bird flu on duck farm

    PARIS –  France has detected a case of the highly contagious H5N8 strain of bird flu on a duck farm in the southwest, the agriculture ministry said on Friday. The outbreak, which killed 2,000 out of a flock of 5,000 ducks on the farm in the Tarn region, follows a case of H5N8 confirmed among wild birds in northern France this week and is the latest of a series of outbreaks in Europe.

  • World cities seek $375 bn to fight climate change
    AFP

    World cities seek $375 bn to fight climate change

    The world's big cities will need $375 billion of investment to curb climate change, a large gathering of mayors heard in Mexico on Thursday. Together we will seek that money," said the new president of the C40 network of big cities, Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo. If that amount is made available "humanity will have a chance of surviving," she told a gathering of C40 mayors in Mexico.

  • These 8 Winter Boots Are the Safest for Icy Conditions
    Travel+Leisure

    These 8 Winter Boots Are the Safest for Icy Conditions

    Leave it to Canadians to determine which footwear you should rely on for icy conditions this winter. Researchers at the Intelligent Design for Adaptation, Participation and Technology labsat the Torontos Rehabilitation Institute used simulatedicy winter conditions to test 98 pairs of winter boots for safety. The eight brands with the highest score achieved only one snowflake, though the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute says it has been working with footwear manufacturers to test prototypes that earned two and three snowflakes.

  • Remains of 5,000-Year-Old Egyptian City Unearthed
    LiveScience.com

    Remains of 5,000-Year-Old Egyptian City Unearthed

    The remains of a 5,000-year-old city, including a cemetery and several houses, have been unearthed at the site of Abydos in Egypt. The city, whose size is not clear, dates to the early dynastic period when the first pharaohs ruled a united Egypt, said Mahmoud Afifi, the head of Ancient Egyptian Antiquities at the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities, in an Arabic language statement.

  • “Fatal” security bugs discovered in defibrillators and medical implants
    Digital Trends

    “Fatal” security bugs discovered in defibrillators and medical implants

    A team of researchers found several potentially “fatal” security flaws in 10 different medical implants. Researchers at the University of Birmingham in the U.K. and the University of Leuven in Belgium discovered vulnerabilities in the software and signals that communicate with implant devices. The device manufacturer name has not been disclosed but researchers said the bugs have since been patched by the maker before the research paper was made public.

  • Thomas Edison's lab door key, lightbulbs up for auction
    Associated Press

    Thomas Edison's lab door key, lightbulbs up for auction

    Thomas Edison's door key to the 19th century lab in New Jersey where he invented the phonograph goes up for auction this weekend, along with lightbulbs he perfected. Six keys in all from the famous inventor's Menlo Park home and work place will be auctioned Saturday in Dallas, along with five lightbulbs, including two that he created. The items were acquired by Charlie Knudsen, 69, of Pittsburgh and had belonged to his great-aunt.

  • Buzz Aldrin Arrives in New Zealand After Being Medically Evacuated From South Pole
    Good Morning America

    Buzz Aldrin Arrives in New Zealand After Being Medically Evacuated From South Pole

    Buzz Aldrin, the second man on the moon, has arrived in New Zealand after he was medically evacuated from the South Pole. Aldrin had fluid in his lungs when he landed but was responding well to antibiotics, according to White Desert Antarctica, the tour company Aldrin traveled with. Aldrin, 86, was visiting the South Pole as part of a tourist group when “his condition deteriorated” and it was decided that he should be evacuated as a “precaution,” according to White Desert.

  • Leaning San Francisco Tower Seen Sinking From Space
    Popular Mechanics

    Leaning San Francisco Tower Seen Sinking From Space

    Engineers in San Francisco have tunneled underground to try and understand the sinking of the 58-story Millennium Tower. The European Space Agency has released detailed data from satellite imagery that shows the skyscraper in San Francisco's financial district is continuing to sink at a steady rate-and perhaps faster than previously known. The luxury high-rise that opened its doors in 2009 has been dubbed the Leaning Tower of San Francisco.

  • Aberystwyth scientists hoping to find life on Mars
    BBC News

    Aberystwyth scientists hoping to find life on Mars

    A Welsh scientist working on sending a robot with a "selfie" stick into space, believes the probe will find life on the Mars. In the next two days Europe's research ministers will decide whether to push ahead with the mission to send the rover to the Martian surface in 2021. A team at Aberystwyth University has developed a special camera on top of the ExoMars rover. Dr Matthew Gun hopes it will finally capture life on the Red Planet. The UK-assembled vehicle would search by sampling soil drilled from under the surface. The team - previously overseen by Prof Dave Barnes, who died in 2014 - is developing calibration equipment for the panoramic camera on the rover. Similar to a chart of "stable"

  • Teen eco activist spurs hope at children's peace prize award
    AFP

    Teen eco activist spurs hope at children's peace prize award

    Award-winning teen environmental activist Kehkashan Basu said Friday ecologists should "not lose hope" in their battle to fight climate change, despite scepticism from world leaders including US President-elect Donald Trump. "These are uncertain times, but I want to tell people to continue their work and not bother about it," Basu, born in Dubai to Indian parents, told AFP in The Hague, where she was awarded the prestigious International Children's Peace Prize. World leaders, CEOs, negotiators and activists attending a UN conference earlier this month in Marrakesh voiced concern following the election of Trump, who has vowed to withdraw the US from a hard-won global agreement on climate change.

  • US lead on AI will shrink without more funding and education
    Engadget

    US lead on AI will shrink without more funding and education

    The hearing's only pleasant surprise was its bipartisan support. Senators from both sides of the aisle, along with Cruz, all took the expert panel's testimony seriously. Granted, AI still has the the new-car smell of a nascent field with great potential, which could boost US labor productivity by 40%, Cruz said in his introductory remarks. Golden bullet it might seem, but even the current experiments using AI to assist or solely could take a chunk out of the 35,000 annual vehicular deaths, 94% of which are caused by human error, committee member Senator Gary Peters noted. Artificial intelligence could save even more lives, said the hearing's first witness, Microsoft Research Lab's managing director

  • Ravenous 14-Foot Python Caught with 3 Deer in Its Gut
    LiveScience.com

    Ravenous 14-Foot Python Caught with 3 Deer in Its Gut

    A Burmese python in the Everglades with a penchant for venison gulped down three whole deer — one doe and two fawns — before wildlife officials captured and euthanized it, a new study reveals. The gustatory feat sets a record: It's the first invasive Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus) caught with three deer in its gut, said study co-lead author Scott Boback, an associate professor of biology at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania. The python probably attacked and ate the deer at different times over a 90-day period, Boback said.

  • 48 bodies unearthed at Black Plague burial site in England
    Fox News

    48 bodies unearthed at Black Plague burial site in England

    Archaeologists in England have discovered the remains of 48 victims of the Black Death in a mass grave, just the third such known site of its kind in the United Kingdom. Among the four dozen bodies found at the site, a medieval abbey in Lincolnshire, England, are the remains of 27 children. The pit was excavated over three summers, and now analysis of DNA found in the teeth of the skeletons has pointed a finger at Yersinia pestis, a bacterium and the culprit of the bubonic plague. Radiocarbon dating has placed the site historically in the 14th century. “To our complete surprise, we found a huge medieval mass grave,” Dr Hugh Willmott, a senior lecturer in the archaeology department at the University