Science

  • ABC News

    China Begins Operating World's Largest Radio Telescope

    The world's largest radio telescope began searching for signals from stars and galaxies and, perhaps, extraterrestrial life Sunday in a project demonstrating China's rising ambitions in space and its pursuit of international scientific prestige. Beijing has poured billions into such ambitious scientific projects as well as its military-backed space program, which saw the launch of China's second space station earlier this month. Measuring 500 meters in diameter, the radio telescope is nestled in a natural basin within a stunning landscape of lush green karst formations in southern Guizhou province. It took five years and $180 million to complete and surpasses that of the 300-meter Arecibo Observatory

  • Musk's SpaceX successfully tests rocket engine that could help us colonize Mars
    CNBC.com

    Musk's SpaceX successfully tests rocket engine that could help us colonize Mars

    The methane-fueled engine is expected to form part of the Dragon rocket, with Musk suggesting the engines are three times more powerful than the current Merlin engines that SpaceX uses on its Falcon 9 rocket. The engine was fired at the company's McGregor, Texas facility, according to a report by tech website Engadget and comes ahead of a long-awaited speech by Elon Musk. USA Today reported on Sunday that Musk would outline his ideas for how to establish a city on Mars within a decade. The speech is due to be held at the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico, and Musk is expected to detail a new system called the "Mars Colonial Transporter," that could deliver 100 people to the planet Mars.

  • ABC News

    Warmer Waters Might Prevent Baby Lobsters From Surviving

    Baby lobsters might not be able to survive in the ocean's waters if the ocean continues to warm at the expected rate. That is the key finding of a study performed by scientists in Maine, the state most closely associated with lobster in the U.S. The scientists found that lobster larvae struggled to survive when they were reared in water 5 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the current temperatures typical of the western Gulf of Maine. That's how much the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change expects the Gulf of Maine to warm by the year 2100. The paper appears this month in the scientific journal ICES (ICE-ees) Journal of Marine Science. Scientists at the University of Maine Darling

  • ABC News

    Mother Uncovers Lasting Impact of Son's Organ Donation

    An ultrasound showed one of Sarah Gray's unborn twins was missing part of his brain, a fatal birth defect. His brother was born healthy but Thomas lived just six days. Latching onto hope for something positive to come from heartache, Gray donated some of Thomas' tissue for scientific research — his eyes, his liver, his umbilical cord blood. Only no one could tell the Washington mother if that precious donation really made a difference. So Gray embarked on an unusual journey to find out, revealing a side of science that laymen seldom glimpse. "Infant eyes are like gold," a Harvard scientist told her. "I don't think people understand how valuable these donations are," said Gray, who hadn't grasped

  • TakePart.com

    Justice Department Says No Thanks to Forensic Science Report

    Common crime lab techniques made famous by shows like Law & Order have come under fire yet again—this time by President Obama’s top scientific advisers. A damning report released this week by the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology calls into question the scientific basis of the forensic analysis of bite marks, mixed DNA samples, hair samples, and footwear, among other techniques. In spite of the esteemed origin of the report, Attorney General Loretta Lynch said the Justice Department wouldn’t heed the findings.

  • India to ratify Paris Agreement climate pact on Oct. 2
    Mashable

    India to ratify Paris Agreement climate pact on Oct. 2

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi said India will ratify the Paris Agreement climate change pact on Oct 2. Modi’s announcement on Sunday is seen as a major boost to the implementation of measures at international level in an attempt to control global warming. Modi added that the country has chosen Oct. 2 to coincide with the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, who lived his entire live with minimum carbon footprint.

  • Paris bans cars along part of River Seine
    AFP

    Paris bans cars along part of River Seine

    The city of Paris on Monday voted to ban cars along a stretch of the River Seine as part of an anti-pollution drive. The project is a centrepiece of the Socialist mayor's battle against pollution, which has also included banning cars from the Champs-Elysees avenue on the first Sunday of every month. The decision affects a stretch along the river that has been pedestrianised for a month every summer since 2002, for the hugely popular Paris Plages riverside beach bonanza.

  • First debate is really Clinton Vs. Roger Ailes
    CNN

    First debate is really Clinton Vs. Roger Ailes

    Smerconish cites an early Trump campaign memo advising to remember how Roger Ailes helped Reagan win in 1984 by sticking to themes over policy details.

  • MH370 wreckage hunter won't give up until mystery solved
    Associated Press

    MH370 wreckage hunter won't give up until mystery solved

    Blaine Gibson, though, hasn't matched the film hero's triumph in finding the legendary chest containing the stone tablets inscribed with the Ten Commandments. The amateur sleuth has had far greater success finding clues from a modern mystery: the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. "Travel is what I do, but I always love travel with a purpose, and solving the mystery of Malaysia 370 is a purpose ... until I or someone else finds out what happened to the plane and those on board," he said while in the Australian capital of Canberra to visit the headquarters for the official plane search.

  • Biologists Receive 2016 MacArthur 'Genius Grants'
    LiveScience.com

    Biologists Receive 2016 MacArthur 'Genius Grants'

    Two biologists have been honored with MacArthur "Genius Grants," the MacArthur Foundation announced today (Sept. 22). The MacArthur "Class of 2016" list of 23 fellows represents exceptional achievements in the sciences and arts, as well as in the advancement of human rights and advocacy for social change.

  • Singapore's manufacturing output inches up by 0.1% in August
    Singapore Business Review

    Singapore's manufacturing output inches up by 0.1% in August

    There has been an upturn in Singapore's manufacturing sector, as output emerges from the red in August. According to the latest figures by the Singapore Economic Development Board manufacturing output increased 0.1% in August 2016.

  • Accesswire

    American CryoStem to Participate in World Medical Tourism & Global Healthcare Congress

    EATONTOWN, NJ / ACCESSWIRE / September 26, 2016 / American CryoStem Corporation (CRYO), a leading developer, marketer and licensor of patented adipose tissue based cellular technologies for the regenerative and personalized medicine industries with laboratories

  • Almost 80% of Australians now believe in climate change
    Mashable

    Almost 80% of Australians now believe in climate change

    Australians overwhelmingly believe in climate change, according to a new poll, and they are more than ready for the government to do something about it. According to The Climate Institute's 2016 Climate of the Nation report, 77 percent of Australians believe climate change is happening. The report, released Monday, also indicates the majority of Australians trust the science that suggests human activity is to blame for climate change.

  • Flight makes emergency landing after Samsung tablet explodes
    FOX News Videos

    Flight makes emergency landing after Samsung tablet explodes

    Device not part of Galaxy Note 7 recall

  • U-2 Spy Plane Crash: Why 'Cold War' Aircraft Are Still Relevant Today
    LiveScience.com

    U-2 Spy Plane Crash: Why 'Cold War' Aircraft Are Still Relevant Today

    A U-2 spy plane that crashed in northern California earlier this week, killing one of the two pilots, focused attention on a normally clandestine aspect of the U.S. military. The U-2 plane has a long and storied history that stretches back to the late 1950s, but how is the reconnaissance aircraft used today? U-2 planes have been flown by the United States and other nations for more than 60 years, as both a spy plane and an instrument of science.

  • Bee Pharma Africa and a Flying Pharmacy
    The Daily Meal

    Bee Pharma Africa and a Flying Pharmacy

    Hugo Fearnley of Whitby, England is studying the potential of bee-produced medicines for the treatment of human diseases. Fearnley, CEO of BeeVital and Director of the Apiceutical Research Centre (ARC), recently earned a Churchill Travelling Fellowship to fund his research and coalition-building in four African countries. One potentially promising compound for Fearnley is propolis, sometimes called bee glue: a mixture of plant resins and wax used for structural purposes in hives.

  • African elephants 'suffer worst decline in 25 years'
    AFP

    African elephants 'suffer worst decline in 25 years'

    The number of African elephants has dropped by around 111,000 in the past decade, a new report released Sunday at the Johannesburg conference on the wildlife trade said, blaming the plummeting figures on poaching. The revelation, the worst drop in 25 years, came amid disagreement on the second day of the global meet over the best way to improve the plight of Africa's elephants, targeted for their tusks. With Namibia and Zimbabwe, wanting to be allowed to sell ivory stockpiles accrued from natural deaths to fund community elephant conservation initiatives, Zimbabwe's Environment Minister Oppah Muchinguri rejected the "imperialistic policies" of opposing countries, branding them a "clear infringement on the sovereign rights of nations".

  • Connecticut becoming a hub for new bioscience companies
    Associated Press

    Connecticut becoming a hub for new bioscience companies

    Connecticut hasn't become the Silicon Valley of bioscience quite yet, but five years after lawmakers made a massive investment to support the development of that industry, there is a thriving hub in Farmington. The labs are being leased to the companies as part of the university's Technology Incubation Program, which is designed to help bioscience and tech companies start and grow in Connecticut.

  • Why India's commercial space programme is thriving
    BBC News

    Why India's commercial space programme is thriving

    On Monday, India sent a rocket into space which successfully launched eight satellites in one go. The main purpose of the launch which took place at the Sriharikota space centre off India's eastern coast, was to put into orbit SCATSAT-1, a satellite that will help weather forecasting. Five of the other satellites that were on board are foreign, from the US, Canada and Algeria. In June India launched 20 satellites in a single mission, the most in the history of the country's ambitious space programme. Seventeen of those were foreign. Monday's launch takes the number of foreign satellites launched by India to 79. This has earned the country more than $120m (£92m). And India's space agency has already

  • Why this biotech startup is going after rare neurological diseases
    Business Insider

    Why this biotech startup is going after rare neurological diseases

    Researchers had noticed that, right off the bat, tumors were growing instead of shrinking, Dr. Jeremy Levin, previously an SVP at competing company Bristol-Meyers Squibb, told Business Insider. Now, Levin is the CEO of Ovid Therapeutics, a pharma company focusing on rare neurological diseases.

  • Want a Real-Life, Full-Size Transformer? This Company Builds Them
    LiveScience.com

    Want a Real-Life, Full-Size Transformer? This Company Builds Them

    Ever wonder what the computer-generated Transformer robots in director Michael Bay's movies would look like in real life? A Turkish company has the answer, with a fully functional Transformer prototype. In a series of videos, the company Letvision unveiled a transforming robot built from a BMW 3 Series coupe.

  • New research center is dedicated to engineering cells into living machines
    Digital Trends

    New research center is dedicated to engineering cells into living machines

    The Golden State will soon house its own “blue-sky” bioengineering center thanks to a healthy grant from the National Science Foundation. Based at the University of California, San Francisco, the $24 million Center for Cellular Construction will be used to study and promote cellular engineering, a young discipline that aims create living machines by manipulating nature. To design these machines, researchers first have to comprehend the complexity of cells and uncover the mechanisms behind self-organization.

  • Supersoldier programs for cognitive enhancement and running speed
    nextbigfuture.com

    Supersoldier programs for cognitive enhancement and running speed

    Paul Scharre, a former Army Ranger and the director of the 20YY Future of Warfare Initiative at the Center for a New American Security, said performance-enhancers that are being explored could offer tremendous operational advantages for warfighters. DARPA has launched 4MM, a project to develop a device that could enable dismounted troops to run a four-minute mile, a benchmark normally reserved for the world’s most elite runners. “The underlying theory there is if you can provide some forward push to … the wearer, can you make it so they can run faster,” said Mike LaFiandra, chief of the dismounted warrior branch in the human research and engineering directorate at the Army Research Laboratory, where 4MM prototypes have been tested. With DARPA funding, researchers at Arizona State University developed a system called Air Legs.

  • Scientists are pushing for a fourth presidential debate for science-based issues to be discussed
    Newsweek

    Scientists are pushing for a fourth presidential debate for science-based issues to be discussed

    This week’s debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton is the first of three the candidates will engage in before the November election. As in years past, each debate will be broadly aimed at one of three single subject areas—domestic policy, the economy and foreign policy.   For the last several election cycles, a consortium of Nobel Prize winners and American scientific associations has been pushing for a fourth separate debate devoted entirely to science issues. (Newsweek covered this effort in-depth.) They argue that in our rapidly advancing, high-tech world, with the greatest global challenge being man-caused climate change, voters need to understand where candidates get their scientific

  • Melting Greenland ice threatens to expose Cold War waste
    AFP

    Melting Greenland ice threatens to expose Cold War waste

    A snow-covered former US army base in Greenland -- dubbed "a city under ice" -- could leak pollutants into the environment as the climate changes, raising difficult questions over who is responsible for a clean-up. In 1959, US army engineers began constructing a futuristic project in northwestern Greenland that might as well have been lifted from a Cold War spy movie. A network of tunnels under the snow contained everything from research facilities to a hospital, a cinema and a church -- all powered by a small, portable nuclear reactor.